What Should Time Be?

What Should Time Be? The current paradigm of time in the marketing literature is one where time is linear, quantifiable and predominantly chronological in nature. This is merely one construct of one aspect of time and a construct that is largely specific to a western, industrialized society. The associated theory of time allocation assumes individuals seek to compress time‐consuming activities. Time compression and the speeding‐up of activities are a current feature of both consumer and industrial marketing. Discusses other constructs of time, drawn from the fields of sociology, psychology and anthropology. Time is two concepts, duration and succession. Time can be cyclical rather than linear and is seen as such within concepts such as the product life cycle. It can also be episodic, as in the celebration of events. Questions whether time is ever truly linear, as our perception of duration varies with the content of the activities that fill that duration. This suggests an alternative to time compression, to fill empty time so as to make duration appear faster. Discusses the limitations of current theory and concepts. Suggests a relativistic approach of describing or scoping time‐consuming activities as an alternative towards developing a more universal understanding of time allocation. Argues that progress is needed in the area to meet the needs of a society where time in general and leisure time in particular are ever more significant. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Marketing Emerald Publishing

What Should Time Be?

European Journal of Marketing, Volume 28 (8/9): 14 – Aug 1, 1994

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/what-should-time-be-0L3Z2HGDZ4
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0309-0566
DOI
10.1108/03090569410067604
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The current paradigm of time in the marketing literature is one where time is linear, quantifiable and predominantly chronological in nature. This is merely one construct of one aspect of time and a construct that is largely specific to a western, industrialized society. The associated theory of time allocation assumes individuals seek to compress time‐consuming activities. Time compression and the speeding‐up of activities are a current feature of both consumer and industrial marketing. Discusses other constructs of time, drawn from the fields of sociology, psychology and anthropology. Time is two concepts, duration and succession. Time can be cyclical rather than linear and is seen as such within concepts such as the product life cycle. It can also be episodic, as in the celebration of events. Questions whether time is ever truly linear, as our perception of duration varies with the content of the activities that fill that duration. This suggests an alternative to time compression, to fill empty time so as to make duration appear faster. Discusses the limitations of current theory and concepts. Suggests a relativistic approach of describing or scoping time‐consuming activities as an alternative towards developing a more universal understanding of time allocation. Argues that progress is needed in the area to meet the needs of a society where time in general and leisure time in particular are ever more significant.

Journal

European Journal of MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1994

Keywords: Marketing; Sociology; Time

References

  • The Time Squeeze,
    Robinson, J.P.
  • Shopping Model of the Time‐sensitive Consumer
    Umesh, U.N.; Pettit, K.L.; Bozman, C.S.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off