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What initiatives do healthcare leaders agree are needed for healthcare system improvement? Results of a modified-Delphi study

What initiatives do healthcare leaders agree are needed for healthcare system improvement?... The purpose of this paper is to identify five quality improvement initiatives for healthcare system leaders, produced by such leaders themselves, and to provide some guidance on how these could be implemented.Design/methodology/approachA multi-stage modified-Delphi process was used, blending the Delphi approach of iterative information collection, analysis and feedback, with the option for participants to revise their judgments.FindingsThe process reached consensus on five initiatives: change information privacy laws; overhaul professional training and work in the workplace; use co-design methods; contract for value and outcomes across health and social care; and use data from across the public and private sectors to improve equity for vulnerable populations and the sickest people.Research limitations/implicationsInformation could not be gathered from all participants at each stage of the modified-Delphi process, and the participants did not include patients and families, potentially limiting the scope and nature of input.Practical implicationsThe practical implications are a set of findings based on what leaders would bring to a decision-making table in an ideal world if given broad scope and capacity to make policy and organisational changes to improve healthcare systems.Originality/valueThis study adds to the literature a suite of recommendations for healthcare quality improvement, produced by a group of experienced healthcare system leaders from a range of contexts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Health Organisation and Management Emerald Publishing

What initiatives do healthcare leaders agree are needed for healthcare system improvement? Results of a modified-Delphi study

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References (38)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1477-7266
DOI
10.1108/jhom-08-2017-0216
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to identify five quality improvement initiatives for healthcare system leaders, produced by such leaders themselves, and to provide some guidance on how these could be implemented.Design/methodology/approachA multi-stage modified-Delphi process was used, blending the Delphi approach of iterative information collection, analysis and feedback, with the option for participants to revise their judgments.FindingsThe process reached consensus on five initiatives: change information privacy laws; overhaul professional training and work in the workplace; use co-design methods; contract for value and outcomes across health and social care; and use data from across the public and private sectors to improve equity for vulnerable populations and the sickest people.Research limitations/implicationsInformation could not be gathered from all participants at each stage of the modified-Delphi process, and the participants did not include patients and families, potentially limiting the scope and nature of input.Practical implicationsThe practical implications are a set of findings based on what leaders would bring to a decision-making table in an ideal world if given broad scope and capacity to make policy and organisational changes to improve healthcare systems.Originality/valueThis study adds to the literature a suite of recommendations for healthcare quality improvement, produced by a group of experienced healthcare system leaders from a range of contexts.

Journal

Journal of Health Organisation and ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 23, 2018

Keywords: Quality improvement; Consensus; Leadership; Organizational innovation; Healthcare delivery

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