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Warehouse management technologies

Warehouse management technologies Purpose – Aims to discover the different technologies used in warehouse stock control. Design/methodology/approach – The paper begins with a review of optical and radio‐frequency product‐labelling technologies, and then examines various devices and systems for reading these labels and integrating stock control into back‐office databases. It then looks at techniques for finding the goods within the warehouse, from simple address labels to radar positioning and inertial navigation, considering both operator‐based and guided vehicle handling systems. Findings – Labelling technologies facilitate automatic product identification. Rugged handheld computers with wireless communications give real‐time capability and integrate stock control into wider software systems for efficient resource management. Speech synthesis provides one man‐machine interface enabling workers to order‐pick under database control. Automated readers record products entering and leaving the warehouse, theoretically removing the need for stock taking. Automatic guided vehicles are now available to stack and retrieve goods in the warehouse. Originality/value – Provides engineers with an overview of the diversity of solutions employed in warehouse stock handling. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sensor Review Emerald Publishing

Warehouse management technologies

Sensor Review , Volume 28 (2): 7 – Mar 28, 2008

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0260-2288
DOI
10.1108/02602280810856660
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Aims to discover the different technologies used in warehouse stock control. Design/methodology/approach – The paper begins with a review of optical and radio‐frequency product‐labelling technologies, and then examines various devices and systems for reading these labels and integrating stock control into back‐office databases. It then looks at techniques for finding the goods within the warehouse, from simple address labels to radar positioning and inertial navigation, considering both operator‐based and guided vehicle handling systems. Findings – Labelling technologies facilitate automatic product identification. Rugged handheld computers with wireless communications give real‐time capability and integrate stock control into wider software systems for efficient resource management. Speech synthesis provides one man‐machine interface enabling workers to order‐pick under database control. Automated readers record products entering and leaving the warehouse, theoretically removing the need for stock taking. Automatic guided vehicles are now available to stack and retrieve goods in the warehouse. Originality/value – Provides engineers with an overview of the diversity of solutions employed in warehouse stock handling.

Journal

Sensor ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 28, 2008

Keywords: Warehousing; Stock control; Mark scanning equipment; Order picking

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