Voicing concerns for greater engagement

Voicing concerns for greater engagement PurposeScholars argue that supervisor’s job insecurity may affect subordinates’ work engagement. Moreover, this relationship may be mediated by subordinates’ pro-social voice and the relationship between the supervisor’s job insecurity and subordinates’ pro-social voice may be moderated by organizational culture. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is twofold. First, to examine the mediating role of the subordinate’s pro-social voice between supervisor’s job insecurity and subordinates’ work engagement. Second, to test the moderating role of organizational culture between supervisor’s job insecurity and the subordinates’ pro-social voice.Design/methodology/approachData were gathered from employees of a large hospital in India using face-to-face data cross-sectional survey method. To test the proposed hypotheses, ordinary least squares regression analysis was performed on the data obtained.FindingsThe results indicated support for the proposed model in two ways. First, the subordinate’s pro-social voice mediated the relationship between supervisor’s job insecurity and the subordinate’s work engagement. Second, organizational culture acted as a moderator between supervisor’s job insecurity and the subordinate’s pro-social voice.Research limitations/implicationsThe results augment social exchange theory by identifying the crucial role that voicing concerns plays in reducing the negative impact of supervisor’s job insecurity on the subordinates’ work engagement.Practical implicationsThe study findings encourage managers to create an organizational culture that allows the subordinates to challenge their supervisor’s decisions.Originality/valueTo the best of the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first study to test job insecurity of the supervisors instead of the same respondents as a predictor of pro-social voice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship Emerald Publishing

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/voicing-concerns-for-greater-engagement-k4iU71FK1Z
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2049-3983
DOI
10.1108/EBHRM-12-2016-0034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeScholars argue that supervisor’s job insecurity may affect subordinates’ work engagement. Moreover, this relationship may be mediated by subordinates’ pro-social voice and the relationship between the supervisor’s job insecurity and subordinates’ pro-social voice may be moderated by organizational culture. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is twofold. First, to examine the mediating role of the subordinate’s pro-social voice between supervisor’s job insecurity and subordinates’ work engagement. Second, to test the moderating role of organizational culture between supervisor’s job insecurity and the subordinates’ pro-social voice.Design/methodology/approachData were gathered from employees of a large hospital in India using face-to-face data cross-sectional survey method. To test the proposed hypotheses, ordinary least squares regression analysis was performed on the data obtained.FindingsThe results indicated support for the proposed model in two ways. First, the subordinate’s pro-social voice mediated the relationship between supervisor’s job insecurity and the subordinate’s work engagement. Second, organizational culture acted as a moderator between supervisor’s job insecurity and the subordinate’s pro-social voice.Research limitations/implicationsThe results augment social exchange theory by identifying the crucial role that voicing concerns plays in reducing the negative impact of supervisor’s job insecurity on the subordinates’ work engagement.Practical implicationsThe study findings encourage managers to create an organizational culture that allows the subordinates to challenge their supervisor’s decisions.Originality/valueTo the best of the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first study to test job insecurity of the supervisors instead of the same respondents as a predictor of pro-social voice.

Journal

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical ScholarshipEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 3, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off