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Variations in Canadian women's ready‐to‐wear standard sizes

Variations in Canadian women's ready‐to‐wear standard sizes Purpose – To demonstrate that the current weaknesses in women's ready‐to‐wear size standardization charts originate not only in the obsolescence of the base data but also in the non‐adherence of order initiators to the suggested standard sizes. Design/methodology/approach – Trouser manufacturers were selected in such a way as to cover the full price‐range spectrum. They provided their waist standard measurements and confirmed that they use the same measurements for all product lines. In‐store measurements were done. Garments were chosen at random from the selection offered in store and measured systematically. The specifications provided by the order initiators, the standard measurements prescribed, and the garment measures were all measured. Findings – Results clearly indicate that order initiators do not adhere to the standard sizes charts and garment manufacturers are incapable or unwilling to produce garments that meet the order initiators’ specifications. Research limitations/implications – Product selection and limited sample do not allow generalization yet clearly confirm this hypothesis. Practical implications – Questions the pertinence of investing heavily in the modernization of standard sizes charts if the industry and the governments are not ready to impose adherence by order initiators. Originality/value – Fills an important void in the existing literature as, although a number of authors have stated that garment manufacturers do not respect the standard sizes proposed by different national organizations or governmental agencies, the authors could not identify one research demonstrating this fact. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management Emerald Publishing

Variations in Canadian women's ready‐to‐wear standard sizes

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1361-2026
DOI
10.1108/13612020610651132
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – To demonstrate that the current weaknesses in women's ready‐to‐wear size standardization charts originate not only in the obsolescence of the base data but also in the non‐adherence of order initiators to the suggested standard sizes. Design/methodology/approach – Trouser manufacturers were selected in such a way as to cover the full price‐range spectrum. They provided their waist standard measurements and confirmed that they use the same measurements for all product lines. In‐store measurements were done. Garments were chosen at random from the selection offered in store and measured systematically. The specifications provided by the order initiators, the standard measurements prescribed, and the garment measures were all measured. Findings – Results clearly indicate that order initiators do not adhere to the standard sizes charts and garment manufacturers are incapable or unwilling to produce garments that meet the order initiators’ specifications. Research limitations/implications – Product selection and limited sample do not allow generalization yet clearly confirm this hypothesis. Practical implications – Questions the pertinence of investing heavily in the modernization of standard sizes charts if the industry and the governments are not ready to impose adherence by order initiators. Originality/value – Fills an important void in the existing literature as, although a number of authors have stated that garment manufacturers do not respect the standard sizes proposed by different national organizations or governmental agencies, the authors could not identify one research demonstrating this fact.

Journal

Journal of Fashion Marketing and ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: Garment industry; Clothing; Fashion; Preferred sizes; Standardization; Labelling; Women; Canada

References