Valuing the land component of improved investment property

Valuing the land component of improved investment property Purpose – Many taxing authorities use unimproved land (site) values as a tax base. In highly developed urban areas this may require the use of indirect valuation methods, such as an extraction technique to arrive at the land value. The purpose of this paper is to propose that the land extraction (residual) valuation calculation of an investment property should incorporate productivity variables, rather than cost based figures, in order to simulate market value principles. Design/methodology/approach – This paper examines the assessment of the land component of investment property as an ad valorem tax base. It justifies a valuation methodology using the market comparison approach before developing a model to meet specified criteria. The model incorporates productivity based benchmarks and differentials appropriate for shopping centre properties. The model is then tested on an Australian shopping centre. Findings – This paper found that the land value component of a major shopping centre in Australia could be derived from comparable vacant and improved sales using the variables of moving annual turnover (MAT) and gross lettable area (GLA) as key value determinants. Research limitations/implications – This exploratory research identified a model that is appropriate for major shopping centres in Queensland, Australia. The model could form the framework for other types of investment property but the key productivity determinants would require re‐examination. Practical implications – This study provides a practical solution to an ongoing valuation problem arising from the rating legislation in Australia, which requires the determination of site value for all property types. Originality/value – This paper uses productivity variables to assess the site value of investment property. This innovative methodology can provide a more accurate appraisal of site values. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Property Investment & Finance Emerald Publishing

Valuing the land component of improved investment property

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1463-578X
DOI
10.1108/14635781211241752
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Many taxing authorities use unimproved land (site) values as a tax base. In highly developed urban areas this may require the use of indirect valuation methods, such as an extraction technique to arrive at the land value. The purpose of this paper is to propose that the land extraction (residual) valuation calculation of an investment property should incorporate productivity variables, rather than cost based figures, in order to simulate market value principles. Design/methodology/approach – This paper examines the assessment of the land component of investment property as an ad valorem tax base. It justifies a valuation methodology using the market comparison approach before developing a model to meet specified criteria. The model incorporates productivity based benchmarks and differentials appropriate for shopping centre properties. The model is then tested on an Australian shopping centre. Findings – This paper found that the land value component of a major shopping centre in Australia could be derived from comparable vacant and improved sales using the variables of moving annual turnover (MAT) and gross lettable area (GLA) as key value determinants. Research limitations/implications – This exploratory research identified a model that is appropriate for major shopping centres in Queensland, Australia. The model could form the framework for other types of investment property but the key productivity determinants would require re‐examination. Practical implications – This study provides a practical solution to an ongoing valuation problem arising from the rating legislation in Australia, which requires the determination of site value for all property types. Originality/value – This paper uses productivity variables to assess the site value of investment property. This innovative methodology can provide a more accurate appraisal of site values.

Journal

Journal of Property Investment & FinanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 6, 2012

Keywords: Depreciated replacement cost; Productivity; Mass appraisal; Residual method; Value benchmarks; Australia; Property; Market value

References

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