Using wikis and blogs to improve collaboration and knowledge sharing

Using wikis and blogs to improve collaboration and knowledge sharing Purpose – Leading business thinkers agree that knowing how to collaborate is the key to effective knowledge creation and sharing, and to future business success. But collaboration is voluntary, and difficult to manage for hierarchical organizations accustomed to top‐down control. This is reflected in the difficulties organizations typically encounter when trying to persuade people to use technology tools designed to support collaboration. Social software, such as wikis and blogs, appears to be different. Wikis and blogs have become established outside the business world in phenomena such as Wikipedia and are now moving into mainstream business practice. The purpose of this article is to explore the role of wikis and blogs in supporting collaboration. Design/methodology/approach – The article explores the use of social software in organizations through three case studies produced as part of a Henley Knowledge Management Forum research project. Findings – The findings suggest that social software has the potential to help organizations develop collaboration capability, but the bottom‐up features that make it attractive to users can also make it unattractive to groups of people with a stake in preserving existing organizational structures. Originality/value – The paper suggests that the impact of social software in an organization depends on the nature of the existing hierarchy and bureaucracy, and that social software can help organizations break down traditional hierarchies that impede collaboration and knowledge sharing. Preliminary work to develop a framework for understanding and managing these interactions is also presented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Strategic HR Review Emerald Publishing

Using wikis and blogs to improve collaboration and knowledge sharing

Strategic HR Review, Volume 7 (3): 8 – Apr 18, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/using-wikis-and-blogs-to-improve-collaboration-and-knowledge-sharing-HEzIKJf3Ej
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1475-4398
DOI
10.1108/14754390810865757
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Leading business thinkers agree that knowing how to collaborate is the key to effective knowledge creation and sharing, and to future business success. But collaboration is voluntary, and difficult to manage for hierarchical organizations accustomed to top‐down control. This is reflected in the difficulties organizations typically encounter when trying to persuade people to use technology tools designed to support collaboration. Social software, such as wikis and blogs, appears to be different. Wikis and blogs have become established outside the business world in phenomena such as Wikipedia and are now moving into mainstream business practice. The purpose of this article is to explore the role of wikis and blogs in supporting collaboration. Design/methodology/approach – The article explores the use of social software in organizations through three case studies produced as part of a Henley Knowledge Management Forum research project. Findings – The findings suggest that social software has the potential to help organizations develop collaboration capability, but the bottom‐up features that make it attractive to users can also make it unattractive to groups of people with a stake in preserving existing organizational structures. Originality/value – The paper suggests that the impact of social software in an organization depends on the nature of the existing hierarchy and bureaucracy, and that social software can help organizations break down traditional hierarchies that impede collaboration and knowledge sharing. Preliminary work to develop a framework for understanding and managing these interactions is also presented.

Journal

Strategic HR ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 18, 2008

Keywords: Team working; Knowledge management; Internet

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month