Using question order for predictive service quality measures

Using question order for predictive service quality measures Purpose – Previous research shows that question order affects responses, but does not indicate which order is more accurate. This study aims to examine the effect of three question orders on measurements of SERVQUAL and global quality in an effort to determine which order produced the most predictive measures. Design/methodology/approach – Three forms of a survey were randomly distributed to users of different services; banking, dental services, and hair salons. Correlation with intention of future interaction was used to identify the order that resulted in the most predictive quality measure. Findings – The paper finds that correlations with intention of future interaction were highest for SERVQUAL in the global‐SERVQUAL order, but highest for the global quality measure in the random order. Research limitation/implications – This study indicates that practitioners and academicians should order questionnaire items differently depending on how the results will be used and which type of measure, specific or global service quality, is the focus of a questionnaire. Generalizations are limited to SERVQUAL and multiple item measures of service quality. Practical implications – The findings indicate which of several question orders can be used to generate the most predictive measures of SERVQUAL and global service quality. Originality/value – Previous research has examined measurement effects of specific‐general question orders, without indicating which order is most predictive. This study includes a random order and also suggests appropriate item order for predictive measures. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Services Marketing Emerald Publishing

Using question order for predictive service quality measures

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/using-question-order-for-predictive-service-quality-measures-X5gLnGgF1y
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0887-6045
DOI
10.1108/08876040810871200
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Previous research shows that question order affects responses, but does not indicate which order is more accurate. This study aims to examine the effect of three question orders on measurements of SERVQUAL and global quality in an effort to determine which order produced the most predictive measures. Design/methodology/approach – Three forms of a survey were randomly distributed to users of different services; banking, dental services, and hair salons. Correlation with intention of future interaction was used to identify the order that resulted in the most predictive quality measure. Findings – The paper finds that correlations with intention of future interaction were highest for SERVQUAL in the global‐SERVQUAL order, but highest for the global quality measure in the random order. Research limitation/implications – This study indicates that practitioners and academicians should order questionnaire items differently depending on how the results will be used and which type of measure, specific or global service quality, is the focus of a questionnaire. Generalizations are limited to SERVQUAL and multiple item measures of service quality. Practical implications – The findings indicate which of several question orders can be used to generate the most predictive measures of SERVQUAL and global service quality. Originality/value – Previous research has examined measurement effects of specific‐general question orders, without indicating which order is most predictive. This study includes a random order and also suggests appropriate item order for predictive measures.

Journal

Journal of Services MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: May 23, 2008

Keywords: Questionnaires; Customer services quality; SERVQUAL

References

  • Assimilation and contrast effects in general/specific questions
    Carlson, J.; Mason, R.; Saltiel, J.; Sangster, R.
  • Context effects in the measurement of attitudes: a comparison of the consistency and framing explanations
    Gaskell, G.D.; Wright, D.B.; O'Muircheartaigh, C.
  • Question order effects on subjective measures of quality of life
    Willets, F.K.; Saltiel, J.
  • An experimental investigation of halo effects in satisfaction measures of service attributes
    Wirtz, J.; Bateson, J.E.G.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off