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Users' preferred interactive e‐health tools on hospital web sites

Users' preferred interactive e‐health tools on hospital web sites Purpose – Healthcare is becoming an important part of people's online content consumption, with people searching for information on diseases or medical problems, treatments or procedures, particular doctors or hospitals, or about parking. This paper aims to investigate what users deem essential on patient‐oriented interactive e‐health tools on hospital web sites. Design/methodology/approach – The findings are based on 242 patients/users from diverse backgrounds in a purposive sample. A modified Delphi technique was used in two rounds of survey to collect and analyze data. Findings – The respondents highly desire core‐business tools, especially access to medical records and lab results, while discounting hospitals' efforts to connect to social media. Hospitals' e‐health implementation on their web sites has greatly lagged behind the users' needs for interacting with hospitals online. It is concluded that, while continuing to provide traditional functional tools, hospitals should expedite their development in providing core e‐business tools and emerging functional tools in order to accomplish multiple objectives, including service, education, and marketing. Research limitations/implications – Hospitals' e‐health development efforts have been behind the users' expectations at large. Future research should explore whether such lagging has resulted mainly from the lack of technical know‐how, lack of funding, and/or lack of vision on the administrative level. Practical implications – The paper provides solid empirical evidence for US hospitals to (re)consider how to prioritize their efforts in implementing e‐health online so as to build a user‐centric web site. Originality/value – Most US hospitals have implemented some form of e‐health online to serve their patients/users, but rarely have researchers studied such efforts. As a result, hospitals have had little evidence to gauge their implementation success. This is the first empirical study that investigates from the patient/user perspective the usefulness of various interactive e‐health tools online. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing Emerald Publishing

Users' preferred interactive e‐health tools on hospital web sites

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1750-6123
DOI
10.1108/17506121211259395
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Healthcare is becoming an important part of people's online content consumption, with people searching for information on diseases or medical problems, treatments or procedures, particular doctors or hospitals, or about parking. This paper aims to investigate what users deem essential on patient‐oriented interactive e‐health tools on hospital web sites. Design/methodology/approach – The findings are based on 242 patients/users from diverse backgrounds in a purposive sample. A modified Delphi technique was used in two rounds of survey to collect and analyze data. Findings – The respondents highly desire core‐business tools, especially access to medical records and lab results, while discounting hospitals' efforts to connect to social media. Hospitals' e‐health implementation on their web sites has greatly lagged behind the users' needs for interacting with hospitals online. It is concluded that, while continuing to provide traditional functional tools, hospitals should expedite their development in providing core e‐business tools and emerging functional tools in order to accomplish multiple objectives, including service, education, and marketing. Research limitations/implications – Hospitals' e‐health development efforts have been behind the users' expectations at large. Future research should explore whether such lagging has resulted mainly from the lack of technical know‐how, lack of funding, and/or lack of vision on the administrative level. Practical implications – The paper provides solid empirical evidence for US hospitals to (re)consider how to prioritize their efforts in implementing e‐health online so as to build a user‐centric web site. Originality/value – Most US hospitals have implemented some form of e‐health online to serve their patients/users, but rarely have researchers studied such efforts. As a result, hospitals have had little evidence to gauge their implementation success. This is the first empirical study that investigates from the patient/user perspective the usefulness of various interactive e‐health tools online.

Journal

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 31, 2012

Keywords: Healthcare new media; Healthcare information technology; E‐health; Hospital web sites; Interactivity

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