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USEFUL LINES FOR STRUCTURAL RESEARCH

USEFUL LINES FOR STRUCTURAL RESEARCH July, 1943 A I R C R.A F T E N G I N E E R I N G future. It would seem to behove research workers to make them­ selves at home with the ideas of statistical theory, to acquire a detailed knowledge of existing structural statistics, and to interest themselves in the collection of further data." Verbum sapientibus satis est. We like to think, and there is at least some evidence for it intrinsic in this paper, that this may have helped to inspire Mr. SHANLEY and those who are working on similar lines. A Quotable Author Mr. SHANLEY is himself essentially quotable and there are num­ erous passages in this paper which bear the emphasis of repetition ; of which we can select only one or two. " After the external loads USEFUL LINES FOR STRUCTURAL acting on the aeroplane have been determined," he writes, " it is RESEARCH necessary to find out how these loads are distributed through the OR the fourth time we are enabled, through his courtesy, to structure. The mass distribution of the aeroplane determines bring to the notice of our readers a paper read in America by where the loads go, but it is the stress analyst's job to find out how Mr. F. R. SHANLEY of the LOCKHEED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION. they get there." " Cutouts in shell structures represent one of the On this occasion it is to the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL meanest of problems facing the aeroplane designer." ENGINEERS that we are also indebted for permission to reproduce it He has a happy knack of bursting a bubble by turning a cold in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. Owing to the incidence of the occasion stream of logic on it (if the analogy be correct) ; as, for instance, in on which it was presented, the present paper was written for the his pointing out that the study of methods of solving beam columns information of those engaged in general mechanical engineering on has been somewhat overdone in view of the fact that the modern the problems peculiar to aeroplane structures, but it is equally aeroplane has a relatively small amount of structure coming within interesting and valuable to the aeronautical engineer, who will un­ this definition—a remark the truth of which is only obvious after it doubtedly find much food for reflection in it. We have previously has been made. called attention to the essentially practical qualities which the We have not room to quote more than one other apothegm—this author brings to bear on the research matters that engage his atten­ time in relation to choice of materials. " The facts are that there is tion and to his generosity, and that of his firm, in making these really not a great deal between various competitive materials on a available to other workers. This is in accordance with an admirable purely strength/weight basis." Though calculated to bring out the American tradition. Would that it were equally prevalent in Eng­ conscientious publicity manager in a cold perspiration, how true land ; but unfortunately a less open-hearted view of such publica­ tha t is. The same could indeed be said, we might, in some trepida­ tion has always been taken in this country than across the Atlantic tion, add, of different methods of construction. and we have as yet noticed no signs of a changes of attitude. Before closing, we should like to call special attention to the section on what are called " structural indexes " as an alternative Speaking for Ourselves to the notoriously difficult scale-models in the study of the principle of dimensional similarity. A most interesting example, in connexion We may perhaps be excused for claiming credit for the fact that with the design of a shear beam or truss, is given. Here, definitely, the first reference in the bibliography attached to the paper is to a is a paper to be read, studied—and enjoyed. " classic " article by Dr. PUGSLEY which appeared as an original contribution in these columns, and that three more of the papers Production Statistics quoted, though read in the United States, were at the time of their presentation selected by us for reproduction in AIRCRAFT ENGINEER­ As a pendant to what has been written above, we might point out ING. We can, therefore, legitimately boast that we have done our that everything, of course, depends on the statistical data being share in keeping our readers abreast of American thought. We reliable. This has, actually, been brought home to us with renewed have always done our best to avoid insularity in the contents of this force by a statement made by the British Broadcasting Corporation journal, and are gratified to be able to point to these examples of on the day on which these lines are being penned. The United our success. States and Canada, it was stated, are turning out between them an The Ground Covered aeroplane every five minutes "all round the clock." This is, accord­ ing to our calculations, in round figures, 8,700 a month. The latest Mr. SHANLEY starts by enumerating the objects of aircraft struc­ figure of U.S. production issued is 6,200 a month—leaving 2,500 for tural research and then proceeds to classify the problems to be Canada. So far, it may be thought, so good. But a recent Ameri­ investigated under the three heads : external, internal and allow­ can Statement claimed the the U.S. alone was producing more aero­ able (failing) loads. Each of these is thereafter examined in such planes than the whole of the rest of the World put together. De­ detail as is possible within the limits of time and space allowable. ducting Canada's apparent 2,500, this leaves a monthly output of In dealing with these he refers to two useful " tools " (the V-g 3,700 for Great Britain, Australia, Germany, the whole of Occupied recorder and the electrical strain gauge), descriptions of which have Europe and Japan, etc. combined. Could nonsense go further? in the past appeared in these columns in reproductions of the papers to which he refers. Not very much has been heard lately of the collection of statistical data on the occurrence and strength of gusts, but we hope this does not mean that this important matter THE ASH BARK-BEETLE has been shelved in the enforced reduction of. transport flying We have received from the Director, Forest Products Research, a caused by the war. So far as the electrical strain gauge is con­ brief note on the effect of the working of this beetle, which has been cerned we are very much impressed with the utility of this develop­ issued in response to a number of inquiries received every year. ment which we should like to see adopted very much more widely Unfortunately it has arrived too late for inclusion this month, though than, so far as we know, has been the case at present. we propose to publish it, with two illustrations, in August. Mean­ while, it is important for timber inspectors to appreciate that there A Sound Suggestion is no justification, on this ground alone, for discarding timber attacked by this insect or for classifying it as unsuitable for use in From Dr. PUGSLEY'S 1939 article to which we have already re­ aircraft construction, as the damage caused is confined to the bark ferred, a quotation is taken which, such is its importance, we think and a superficial layer of the sapwood from which all traces of the it well to reproduce here: " A second factor for comment is the insect can easily be eliminated by trimming the edges. part which statistical methods and viewpoints may play in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

USEFUL LINES FOR STRUCTURAL RESEARCH

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 15 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1943

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

July, 1943 A I R C R.A F T E N G I N E E R I N G future. It would seem to behove research workers to make them­ selves at home with the ideas of statistical theory, to acquire a detailed knowledge of existing structural statistics, and to interest themselves in the collection of further data." Verbum sapientibus satis est. We like to think, and there is at least some evidence for it intrinsic in this paper, that this may have helped to inspire Mr. SHANLEY and those who are working on similar lines. A Quotable Author Mr. SHANLEY is himself essentially quotable and there are num­ erous passages in this paper which bear the emphasis of repetition ; of which we can select only one or two. " After the external loads USEFUL LINES FOR STRUCTURAL acting on the aeroplane have been determined," he writes, " it is RESEARCH necessary to find out how these loads are distributed through the OR the fourth time we are enabled, through his courtesy, to structure. The mass distribution of the aeroplane determines bring to the notice of our readers a paper read in America by where the loads go, but it is the stress analyst's job to find out how Mr. F. R. SHANLEY of the LOCKHEED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION. they get there." " Cutouts in shell structures represent one of the On this occasion it is to the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL meanest of problems facing the aeroplane designer." ENGINEERS that we are also indebted for permission to reproduce it He has a happy knack of bursting a bubble by turning a cold in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. Owing to the incidence of the occasion stream of logic on it (if the analogy be correct) ; as, for instance, in on which it was presented, the present paper was written for the his pointing out that the study of methods of solving beam columns information of those engaged in general mechanical engineering on has been somewhat overdone in view of the fact that the modern the problems peculiar to aeroplane structures, but it is equally aeroplane has a relatively small amount of structure coming within interesting and valuable to the aeronautical engineer, who will un­ this definition—a remark the truth of which is only obvious after it doubtedly find much food for reflection in it. We have previously has been made. called attention to the essentially practical qualities which the We have not room to quote more than one other apothegm—this author brings to bear on the research matters that engage his atten­ time in relation to choice of materials. " The facts are that there is tion and to his generosity, and that of his firm, in making these really not a great deal between various competitive materials on a available to other workers. This is in accordance with an admirable purely strength/weight basis." Though calculated to bring out the American tradition. Would that it were equally prevalent in Eng­ conscientious publicity manager in a cold perspiration, how true land ; but unfortunately a less open-hearted view of such publica­ tha t is. The same could indeed be said, we might, in some trepida­ tion has always been taken in this country than across the Atlantic tion, add, of different methods of construction. and we have as yet noticed no signs of a changes of attitude. Before closing, we should like to call special attention to the section on what are called " structural indexes " as an alternative Speaking for Ourselves to the notoriously difficult scale-models in the study of the principle of dimensional similarity. A most interesting example, in connexion We may perhaps be excused for claiming credit for the fact that with the design of a shear beam or truss, is given. Here, definitely, the first reference in the bibliography attached to the paper is to a is a paper to be read, studied—and enjoyed. " classic " article by Dr. PUGSLEY which appeared as an original contribution in these columns, and that three more of the papers Production Statistics quoted, though read in the United States, were at the time of their presentation selected by us for reproduction in AIRCRAFT ENGINEER­ As a pendant to what has been written above, we might point out ING. We can, therefore, legitimately boast that we have done our that everything, of course, depends on the statistical data being share in keeping our readers abreast of American thought. We reliable. This has, actually, been brought home to us with renewed have always done our best to avoid insularity in the contents of this force by a statement made by the British Broadcasting Corporation journal, and are gratified to be able to point to these examples of on the day on which these lines are being penned. The United our success. States and Canada, it was stated, are turning out between them an The Ground Covered aeroplane every five minutes "all round the clock." This is, accord­ ing to our calculations, in round figures, 8,700 a month. The latest Mr. SHANLEY starts by enumerating the objects of aircraft struc­ figure of U.S. production issued is 6,200 a month—leaving 2,500 for tural research and then proceeds to classify the problems to be Canada. So far, it may be thought, so good. But a recent Ameri­ investigated under the three heads : external, internal and allow­ can Statement claimed the the U.S. alone was producing more aero­ able (failing) loads. Each of these is thereafter examined in such planes than the whole of the rest of the World put together. De­ detail as is possible within the limits of time and space allowable. ducting Canada's apparent 2,500, this leaves a monthly output of In dealing with these he refers to two useful " tools " (the V-g 3,700 for Great Britain, Australia, Germany, the whole of Occupied recorder and the electrical strain gauge), descriptions of which have Europe and Japan, etc. combined. Could nonsense go further? in the past appeared in these columns in reproductions of the papers to which he refers. Not very much has been heard lately of the collection of statistical data on the occurrence and strength of gusts, but we hope this does not mean that this important matter THE ASH BARK-BEETLE has been shelved in the enforced reduction of. transport flying We have received from the Director, Forest Products Research, a caused by the war. So far as the electrical strain gauge is con­ brief note on the effect of the working of this beetle, which has been cerned we are very much impressed with the utility of this develop­ issued in response to a number of inquiries received every year. ment which we should like to see adopted very much more widely Unfortunately it has arrived too late for inclusion this month, though than, so far as we know, has been the case at present. we propose to publish it, with two illustrations, in August. Mean­ while, it is important for timber inspectors to appreciate that there A Sound Suggestion is no justification, on this ground alone, for discarding timber attacked by this insect or for classifying it as unsuitable for use in From Dr. PUGSLEY'S 1939 article to which we have already re­ aircraft construction, as the damage caused is confined to the bark ferred, a quotation is taken which, such is its importance, we think and a superficial layer of the sapwood from which all traces of the it well to reproduce here: " A second factor for comment is the insect can easily be eliminated by trimming the edges. part which statistical methods and viewpoints may play in the

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1943

There are no references for this article.