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Use and awareness of electronic information services by academic staff at Glasgow Caledonian University

Use and awareness of electronic information services by academic staff at Glasgow Caledonian... The present study reports on the use of electronic information services by staff at GCU. It is part of a wider study which reports on usage by both staff and students. It builds on previous work at Leeds Metropolitan University, and as the user population at GCU is well understood the outcomes contain useful baseline data for comparison. It reports on the views of 97 respondents out of an academic staff of about 700. The freely available Internet was the most widely used source, which some respondents viewed as a more appropriate source of vocationally orientated information than passworded databases. Less than a third used the catalogue to find EIS, which raises questions about the future of the catalogue as a free‐standing comprehensive resource. Non‐use of EIS was rarely due to difficulty of access or use. Staff were pessimistic about their student's skill levels in using EIS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library Review Emerald Publishing

Use and awareness of electronic information services by academic staff at Glasgow Caledonian University

Library Review , Volume 53 (8): 7 – Oct 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0024-2535
DOI
10.1108/00242530410556238
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study reports on the use of electronic information services by staff at GCU. It is part of a wider study which reports on usage by both staff and students. It builds on previous work at Leeds Metropolitan University, and as the user population at GCU is well understood the outcomes contain useful baseline data for comparison. It reports on the views of 97 respondents out of an academic staff of about 700. The freely available Internet was the most widely used source, which some respondents viewed as a more appropriate source of vocationally orientated information than passworded databases. Less than a third used the catalogue to find EIS, which raises questions about the future of the catalogue as a free‐standing comprehensive resource. Non‐use of EIS was rarely due to difficulty of access or use. Staff were pessimistic about their student's skill levels in using EIS.

Journal

Library ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 2004

Keywords: Information services; Academic libraries; Electronic media

References