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Understanding the challenge of a widening access framework within mental health

Understanding the challenge of a widening access framework within mental health Purpose – This paper recognises that Government policy in the UK is increasingly moving toward greater inclusion of education in mental health (MH) recovery. This research will support this move by offering evidence of innovative practice involving service‐users, HE curriculum delivery and research experiences, within MH. Design/methodology/approach – This is the early stages of the first cycle of an action research model which uses participant led research, supported by HE, community and MH teams promoting positive MH and wellbeing. Findings – Early findings will demonstrate how BeWEHL (Bettering Wellbeing, Education, Health and Lifestyle) has been effective at raising confidence, reducing clinical dependency but above all, raising aspirations for learning among all those service‐users involved in this project. Research limitations/implications – While the outcomes of this research are very positive, and do show some significant, early potential for using HE as an intervention strategy for engaging service‐users in additional learning, these findings are premised on small numbers and as such a bigger sample will be needed. Practical implications – MH is poses significant challenges to retention and submissions. Equally, recruitment is, to a large extent, reliant on clinical teams posing dilemmas to ongoing student promotion. Originality/value – This paper will be of interest to those working within widening access, MH, other researchers, service‐users and others interested in or working within holistic care plans. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning Emerald Publishing

Understanding the challenge of a widening access framework within mental health

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-3896
DOI
10.1108/HESWBL-06-2012-0013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper recognises that Government policy in the UK is increasingly moving toward greater inclusion of education in mental health (MH) recovery. This research will support this move by offering evidence of innovative practice involving service‐users, HE curriculum delivery and research experiences, within MH. Design/methodology/approach – This is the early stages of the first cycle of an action research model which uses participant led research, supported by HE, community and MH teams promoting positive MH and wellbeing. Findings – Early findings will demonstrate how BeWEHL (Bettering Wellbeing, Education, Health and Lifestyle) has been effective at raising confidence, reducing clinical dependency but above all, raising aspirations for learning among all those service‐users involved in this project. Research limitations/implications – While the outcomes of this research are very positive, and do show some significant, early potential for using HE as an intervention strategy for engaging service‐users in additional learning, these findings are premised on small numbers and as such a bigger sample will be needed. Practical implications – MH is poses significant challenges to retention and submissions. Equally, recruitment is, to a large extent, reliant on clinical teams posing dilemmas to ongoing student promotion. Originality/value – This paper will be of interest to those working within widening access, MH, other researchers, service‐users and others interested in or working within holistic care plans.

Journal

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based LearningEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 27, 2013

Keywords: Mental health; Recovery model; Service‐user; Widening access; Skills progression; Learner choices; Meaningful employment; Guided reflection; Experiential learning; Learning activities

References