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UK industry guidelines on nutrition labelling to benefit the consumer

UK industry guidelines on nutrition labelling to benefit the consumer A three‐year consumer research programme, using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, was undertaken to assess whether additional voluntary nutrition information for calories and fat would aid consumers’ ability to use the nutrition information that is given on food packs. A variety of label formats was investigated. The research established that providing information for calories and fat per serving, either separately from the nutrition panel or highlighted within the nutrition panel, and providing Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs) for calories and fat helped to make the nutrition information more accessible to consumers. GDAs were felt by consumers to be new and useful information. The research findings were developed into voluntary industry guidelines by an IGD working group consisting of representatives of manufacturers, retailers, consumer organizations, nutrition scientists and government. The guidelines represent best practice for industry. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

UK industry guidelines on nutrition labelling to benefit the consumer

Nutrition & Food Science , Volume 99 (1): 5 – Feb 1, 1999

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References (4)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
none
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/00346659910247644
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A three‐year consumer research programme, using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, was undertaken to assess whether additional voluntary nutrition information for calories and fat would aid consumers’ ability to use the nutrition information that is given on food packs. A variety of label formats was investigated. The research established that providing information for calories and fat per serving, either separately from the nutrition panel or highlighted within the nutrition panel, and providing Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs) for calories and fat helped to make the nutrition information more accessible to consumers. GDAs were felt by consumers to be new and useful information. The research findings were developed into voluntary industry guidelines by an IGD working group consisting of representatives of manufacturers, retailers, consumer organizations, nutrition scientists and government. The guidelines represent best practice for industry.

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1999

Keywords: Consumer attitudes; Labelling; Market research; Nutrition

There are no references for this article.