U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications 334 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G October, 1938 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 1. A wing lift increasing device comprising, a 2,116,953 . Airplane Structure. Adolf Sam- 2,118,705 . Airplane. Randolph F. Hall, manuall y actuatable tiltable flap constituting a Rochester, N.Y. Original application October 23, braus , Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany Applica­ hingedly mounted part of the rear portion of the 1933. Serial No. 694,866. Divided and this tion September 7, 1934. Serial No. 743,126. 3 wing spaced from the fixed wing portion to pro­ application, September 19, 1935. Serial No. 41,313. Claims. [Class 244-131.] vide a re-energizing wing slot between the fixed 26 claims. [Class 244-42.] wing portion and the flap, and a curved deflector plat e projecting at its forward edge into said slot a t all operative positions of said flap to direct th e re-energizing slot discharge along the upper surface of said flap. 2,118,455 . Shock Absorber for Airplanes. Joh n F. Wallace, Cleveland, Ohio, assignor to The Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Company, Cleveland, 1. In a variable lift wing, a vertically swing- Ohio, a corporation of Ohio. Application July 2, able under trailing flap extending for the major 1936. Serial No. 88,621. 7 Claims. [Cl. 267-64.] portion of the wing span, ailerons on the wing forming trailing portions of the wing upper sur­ face above said under flap a t opposite outer portions of the flap sp n, a vertically swingable vppcr flap inboard of said ailerons above the under 3. A joint structure for a curved surface in flap, and operative connexions between the under aircraft construction comprising intersecting and flap and said upper flap for swinging the upper overlapping strips of sheet metal covering said flap by vertical swinging of the under flap, said curved surface and joined by a soft solder only, connexions arranged to impart less angular move­ and exposed principally to shear, said metal strips men t to the upper flap than the angular movement being of foil-like thickness and being composed of the lower flap. of a high tensile strength heat treated steel, and— said solder having a fusing temperature inter 2,118,929 : Slip-way Beacon. Ernst Kramar, mediate the fusing temperatures of lead-tin and Berlin-Tempelhof, Germany, assignor to C. Lorenz brazing solders for steel. Aktienge ellschaft, Berlin-Tempelhof, Germany, a German company. Application March 7, 1935. 2,117,062 . Variable Pitch Propeller. Bruno Serial No. 9,808. In Germany, March 1, 1934 Jablonsky, London, England. Application October 1. In a shock absorber subjected to torsional 3 claims. [Class 250-11.] 3 , 1935. Serial No. 43,419. In Great Britain, strains , a pair of telescoping cylinders adapted Februar y 6, 1935. 5 Claims. [Class 170-164.] to be attached to the elements whose relative 1. Variable pitch propeller, com­ movement s are to be cushioned, upper and lower prising a plurality of blades, a root torqu e legs connected together at their outer membe r upon each of said blades, extremities by a flexible joint, and hinge connec­ each of said root members being in tions between the inner ends of the legs and the th e form of a disc having a plane two cylinders respectively, said legs being wide surface disposed obliquely to the a t their inner ends and narrow at their outer longitudinal axis of the respective ends, and the hinge connexions at their inner blade, a commo n bearing disc between ends being longer than the width of the joint at said root members and having plane th e outer ends. surfaces respectively adjacent said plane surfaces of said roots, a collar 2,118,550 . Mounting of Radial Cylinder embracing all said root members Engines . Paul Charles Albert Marie d'Aubarede, 1. In a slip-way beacon wherein the point at and said disc and holding the plane Saint-Genis-Laval, France. Application May 15, which the descent for landing should be com­ surfaces of said root members 1937. Serial No. 142,900. In Germany and Italy, menced along a gliding path is indicated to th in abutting engagement with the May 18, 1935. 10-Glaims. [Class 180-64.] aircraft by an additional signal transmitted respective plane surfaces of said 1. In combination a frame` wireless, the method of aiding the landing of air disc, mutually inclined slots in said a n engine assembly com­ craft which comprises transmitting verticall root discs, parallel grooves in said prising an engine proper polarized radiations for the gliding path am collar, a slot spacing disc parallel with cylinders radially dis­ transmittin g horizontally polarized radiations fo with said grooves, a transverse pin posed about a motor shaft, th e additional signal in a plane normal to th extendin g through said slots and said engine producin g periodic direction of landing of said aircraft. engaging at its ends in said collar torque s tending to oscillate grooves, and means for moving said pin in the said engine assembly about 2,118,998 . Interior Trim for Aircraft pat h defined by the grooves in said collar, to a varying natural oscillation Marvin Alnutt, Seattle, Wash, assignor to Boein impar t turning forces to said root members. axi s passing through the Aircraft Company, Seattle, Wash., a corporation c centr e of gravity thereof and Washington . Application August 10, 1937. Seria 2,117,607 . Slotted Deflector Flap. Roger W. parallel in average direction No . 158,316. 10 claims. [Class 72-115.] Griswold, II, Old Lyme, Conn., assignor to United to said motor shaft, and 9. Means to support Aircraft Corporation, East Hartford, Conn., a said engine also producing aircraft wall panels of corporation of Delaware. Application August 4, periodic forces tending to oscillate said engine stretchabl e fabric or 1936, Serial No. 94,189. 24 claims. [Cl. 244-42.] assembly conically about a varying natural th e like, comprising oscillation centre substantially disposed on the supportin g strips average position of said varying natural oscilla­ fixed to the aircraft tion axis; driving shafts through which a driving structur e at locations torqu e is derived from said engine assembly, said corresponding to the driving shafts being supported by said engine edges of such panels, assembly transversely of said motor shaft; spring an d resilient studs mean s adapted to maintain said engine assembly spaced at intervals on said frame while permitting the conical oscilla­ along the supporting tions thereof and resisting the average driving strips , and projecting torqu e exerted by said driving shafts; and a flex­ generally at right an­ ible connexion for yieldably retaining said engine gles to the plane of assembly with respect to said frame, said con­ th e panels, bu t inclined nexion being arranged to permit conical oscilla­ slight y away from the tions of said engine assembly, and said concen- centr e of the panels, * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States tion being disposed substantially on the average th e resilience of the are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the Official Gazelle of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of position of said varying natural oscillation axis, stud s operating to the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the a t a position intermediate between the centre of stretc h the fabric be­ Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. gravit y of said engine assembly and the average tween studs at its Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied position of said varying natural oscillation centre. opposite edges. by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 10 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1938

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/u-s-patent-specifications-wqpWQ0M1R6
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030389
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

334 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G October, 1938 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 1. A wing lift increasing device comprising, a 2,116,953 . Airplane Structure. Adolf Sam- 2,118,705 . Airplane. Randolph F. Hall, manuall y actuatable tiltable flap constituting a Rochester, N.Y. Original application October 23, braus , Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany Applica­ hingedly mounted part of the rear portion of the 1933. Serial No. 694,866. Divided and this tion September 7, 1934. Serial No. 743,126. 3 wing spaced from the fixed wing portion to pro­ application, September 19, 1935. Serial No. 41,313. Claims. [Class 244-131.] vide a re-energizing wing slot between the fixed 26 claims. [Class 244-42.] wing portion and the flap, and a curved deflector plat e projecting at its forward edge into said slot a t all operative positions of said flap to direct th e re-energizing slot discharge along the upper surface of said flap. 2,118,455 . Shock Absorber for Airplanes. Joh n F. Wallace, Cleveland, Ohio, assignor to The Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Company, Cleveland, 1. In a variable lift wing, a vertically swing- Ohio, a corporation of Ohio. Application July 2, able under trailing flap extending for the major 1936. Serial No. 88,621. 7 Claims. [Cl. 267-64.] portion of the wing span, ailerons on the wing forming trailing portions of the wing upper sur­ face above said under flap a t opposite outer portions of the flap sp n, a vertically swingable vppcr flap inboard of said ailerons above the under 3. A joint structure for a curved surface in flap, and operative connexions between the under aircraft construction comprising intersecting and flap and said upper flap for swinging the upper overlapping strips of sheet metal covering said flap by vertical swinging of the under flap, said curved surface and joined by a soft solder only, connexions arranged to impart less angular move­ and exposed principally to shear, said metal strips men t to the upper flap than the angular movement being of foil-like thickness and being composed of the lower flap. of a high tensile strength heat treated steel, and— said solder having a fusing temperature inter 2,118,929 : Slip-way Beacon. Ernst Kramar, mediate the fusing temperatures of lead-tin and Berlin-Tempelhof, Germany, assignor to C. Lorenz brazing solders for steel. Aktienge ellschaft, Berlin-Tempelhof, Germany, a German company. Application March 7, 1935. 2,117,062 . Variable Pitch Propeller. Bruno Serial No. 9,808. In Germany, March 1, 1934 Jablonsky, London, England. Application October 1. In a shock absorber subjected to torsional 3 claims. [Class 250-11.] 3 , 1935. Serial No. 43,419. In Great Britain, strains , a pair of telescoping cylinders adapted Februar y 6, 1935. 5 Claims. [Class 170-164.] to be attached to the elements whose relative 1. Variable pitch propeller, com­ movement s are to be cushioned, upper and lower prising a plurality of blades, a root torqu e legs connected together at their outer membe r upon each of said blades, extremities by a flexible joint, and hinge connec­ each of said root members being in tions between the inner ends of the legs and the th e form of a disc having a plane two cylinders respectively, said legs being wide surface disposed obliquely to the a t their inner ends and narrow at their outer longitudinal axis of the respective ends, and the hinge connexions at their inner blade, a commo n bearing disc between ends being longer than the width of the joint at said root members and having plane th e outer ends. surfaces respectively adjacent said plane surfaces of said roots, a collar 2,118,550 . Mounting of Radial Cylinder embracing all said root members Engines . Paul Charles Albert Marie d'Aubarede, 1. In a slip-way beacon wherein the point at and said disc and holding the plane Saint-Genis-Laval, France. Application May 15, which the descent for landing should be com­ surfaces of said root members 1937. Serial No. 142,900. In Germany and Italy, menced along a gliding path is indicated to th in abutting engagement with the May 18, 1935. 10-Glaims. [Class 180-64.] aircraft by an additional signal transmitted respective plane surfaces of said 1. In combination a frame` wireless, the method of aiding the landing of air disc, mutually inclined slots in said a n engine assembly com­ craft which comprises transmitting verticall root discs, parallel grooves in said prising an engine proper polarized radiations for the gliding path am collar, a slot spacing disc parallel with cylinders radially dis­ transmittin g horizontally polarized radiations fo with said grooves, a transverse pin posed about a motor shaft, th e additional signal in a plane normal to th extendin g through said slots and said engine producin g periodic direction of landing of said aircraft. engaging at its ends in said collar torque s tending to oscillate grooves, and means for moving said pin in the said engine assembly about 2,118,998 . Interior Trim for Aircraft pat h defined by the grooves in said collar, to a varying natural oscillation Marvin Alnutt, Seattle, Wash, assignor to Boein impar t turning forces to said root members. axi s passing through the Aircraft Company, Seattle, Wash., a corporation c centr e of gravity thereof and Washington . Application August 10, 1937. Seria 2,117,607 . Slotted Deflector Flap. Roger W. parallel in average direction No . 158,316. 10 claims. [Class 72-115.] Griswold, II, Old Lyme, Conn., assignor to United to said motor shaft, and 9. Means to support Aircraft Corporation, East Hartford, Conn., a said engine also producing aircraft wall panels of corporation of Delaware. Application August 4, periodic forces tending to oscillate said engine stretchabl e fabric or 1936, Serial No. 94,189. 24 claims. [Cl. 244-42.] assembly conically about a varying natural th e like, comprising oscillation centre substantially disposed on the supportin g strips average position of said varying natural oscilla­ fixed to the aircraft tion axis; driving shafts through which a driving structur e at locations torqu e is derived from said engine assembly, said corresponding to the driving shafts being supported by said engine edges of such panels, assembly transversely of said motor shaft; spring an d resilient studs mean s adapted to maintain said engine assembly spaced at intervals on said frame while permitting the conical oscilla­ along the supporting tions thereof and resisting the average driving strips , and projecting torqu e exerted by said driving shafts; and a flex­ generally at right an­ ible connexion for yieldably retaining said engine gles to the plane of assembly with respect to said frame, said con­ th e panels, bu t inclined nexion being arranged to permit conical oscilla­ slight y away from the tions of said engine assembly, and said concen- centr e of the panels, * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States tion being disposed substantially on the average th e resilience of the are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the Official Gazelle of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of position of said varying natural oscillation axis, stud s operating to the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the a t a position intermediate between the centre of stretc h the fabric be­ Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. gravit y of said engine assembly and the average tween studs at its Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied position of said varying natural oscillation centre. opposite edges. by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1938

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off