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U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING 252 September, 1937 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,082,598 . Airplane Landing Gear. metal , an external screw- 1. In an aeroplane construction having a fuselage, Raymon d Saulnier, Puteaux, France. Application threa d formed on said root- a main wing extending on opposite sides of the March 19, 1936. Serial No. 69,627. In Germany portion , a sleeve of harder fuselage, a plurality of motor nacelles mounted on March 22, 1935. 18 claims. [Class 244-102.] meta l to surround and rein­ said main wing at spaced positions thereon, pro­ 1. A retractable landing gear for an aeroplane force said root-portion, a pellers operatively positioned forwardly of said which comprises, in combination, at least two screw-thread formed on the nacelles for driving the aeroplane, at least one strut s pivotally connected together and each interna l surface of said sleeve auxiliary wing plane mounted above said main pivotally connected to said aeroplane, a wheel an d engaging, by a shrink- plane and spaced therefrom, said auxiliary plane carried by one of said struts, one of said struts fit over its entire length, havin g a chord width of substantially a quarter with the screw-thread on the of the chord width of said main plane such tha t a said root-portion. substantiall y normal airstream hump will form on a n upper surface of said main wing plane, the spacing between said auxiliary and main pianos 2,084,122 . Apparatus for Controlling Air­ being such that the auxiliary plane will have a plan e Elevators. Robert W. Ayer, Wayne, heigh t such that its top surface will be below a Mich., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Stinson horizontal plane taken along the upper limit of Aircraft Corporation, Wayne, Mich., a corporation trave l of the tips of said propellers, the arrangement of Michigan. Application April 13, 1935. Serial being such that said main wing plane will handle No . 16,130. 3 claims. [Class 244-80.] th e airstreams in the usual manner of a monoplane. 1. The combination with an aeroplane having a pilot' s compartmen t and an elevator, of a n auxiliary 2,084,790 . Cabin and Window Structure. ta b connected to the elevator so that it is movable Fran k R. Canney, Seattle, Wash., assignor to into different angular positions relatively thereto, means for setting the position of the ta b with respect to the elevator so as to control the latter for aero­ plane trimming purposes, comprising tab raising an d lowering cables connected at one end thereof to the tab and a cable actuating element disposed in the pilot's compartment and connected to the cables at the other end thereof, and a vertically extendin g arm positioned adjacent the mid-portion of the cables and having the upper end thereof pivoted so tha t it is free to swing lengthwise of the being of jointed structure and including two aeroplane, said arm being weighted at its lower elements articulated with respect to each other, an operatin g device, wholly supported by said jointed stru t and mechanically independent of the aero­ plane proper, including two parts movable with respect to each other, one of said parts being mechanically connected to said strut elements, mechanical means for interconnecting the other par t of said device with each of these two strut elements in such manner that relative displace­ Boeing Aircraft Company, Seattle, Wash., a corpora­ ment s of these two parts of the device produce tion of Washington. Application December 16, angula r displacements of the strut elements, and 1936. Serial No. 116,158. 5 claims. [Class 244- means , operative from the aeroplane proper, for 119.] producing displacements of said two parts of the end so that it maintains its vertical position in 1. In an aircraft structure having a generally operatin g device with respect to each other. response to the action of gravity, and having a rounded cross section and elongated shape with a plurality of sheaves at its upper end, said sheaves generally rounded end, structural members dis­ being so arranged and the mid-portions of the 2,083,226 . Girder for Struts or the Like. posed to resist expansive stresses developed by cables being so wrapped around the sheaves that Claude Dornier, Friedrichshafen-on-the-Bodenseo, interna l pressure, and a skin carried by said struc­ when the aeroplane during flight tilts from its Germany , assignor of one-half to Dornier-Metall- tura l members, said structural members being normal flying position and the arm as a result baute n G.m.b.H., Friedrichshafen-on-the-Boden- interrupte d over an appreciable area to afford an swings relatively to the aeroplane the portions of opening, and tension members extending across the cables between the arm and the tab are moved such opening and connecting structural members independently of the portions between the arm a t opposite sides thereof, and disposed substan­ and the actuating element and shift the tab into a tially along geodesic lines, to transmit such stresses position wherein the elevator is controlled so that most directly and substantially entirely in tension. it tends to return the aeroplane to its normal flying 2,086,085 . Aircraft control gear. Gustav position. see, Germany. Application October 18, 1932. Victor Lachmann, George Rudolph Volkert, and Serial No. 638,348. In Germany October 28, 1931. 10 claims. [Class 189-37.] 2,084,502 . Airplane Construction. Thomas 6. A girder comprising a pair of chords tapered W. Rieder, Pittsburgh, Pa. Application April 24, in width towards one end and provided with a 1936. Serial No. 76,161. 2claims. [Class244-45.] pluralit y of spaced substantially parallel longi­ tudinall y extending flanges, a plurality of longi­ tudinally extending webs secured to said flanges an d uniting said chords, said webs being short and overlapped and their spacing being reduced towards said tapered end. 2,083,439 . Airscrew. Alfred Hubert Roy Fedde n and Frank Morgan Owner, Bristol, England, assignors to The Bristol Aeroplane Company, Walte r James Dare, Cricklewood, England, as­ Limited, Bristol, England, a British company. signors to Handley Page, Ltd., London, England. Application July 31, 1935. Serial No. 34,084. In Application October 3, 1935, Serial No. 43,463. Grea t Britain September 21, 1934. 4 claims. I n Great Britain May 14, 1935. 11 claims. [Class [Class 170-173.] 244-42.] 1. A reinforced airscrew blade comprising a 4 . In an aeroplane having a wing and a flap, cylindrical root-portion of comparatively soft means associating the flap with the wing com­ prising a radius link within the wing pivoted at * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United State one end to the wing, two links pivoted at spaced are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the point s on the radius link and at spaced points Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the on the flap, means for limiting the extent and Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. direction of the thrust of said links and means Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied for rotating the radius link. by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 9 (9): 1 – Sep 1, 1937

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030228
Publisher site
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Abstract

AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING 252 September, 1937 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,082,598 . Airplane Landing Gear. metal , an external screw- 1. In an aeroplane construction having a fuselage, Raymon d Saulnier, Puteaux, France. Application threa d formed on said root- a main wing extending on opposite sides of the March 19, 1936. Serial No. 69,627. In Germany portion , a sleeve of harder fuselage, a plurality of motor nacelles mounted on March 22, 1935. 18 claims. [Class 244-102.] meta l to surround and rein­ said main wing at spaced positions thereon, pro­ 1. A retractable landing gear for an aeroplane force said root-portion, a pellers operatively positioned forwardly of said which comprises, in combination, at least two screw-thread formed on the nacelles for driving the aeroplane, at least one strut s pivotally connected together and each interna l surface of said sleeve auxiliary wing plane mounted above said main pivotally connected to said aeroplane, a wheel an d engaging, by a shrink- plane and spaced therefrom, said auxiliary plane carried by one of said struts, one of said struts fit over its entire length, havin g a chord width of substantially a quarter with the screw-thread on the of the chord width of said main plane such tha t a said root-portion. substantiall y normal airstream hump will form on a n upper surface of said main wing plane, the spacing between said auxiliary and main pianos 2,084,122 . Apparatus for Controlling Air­ being such that the auxiliary plane will have a plan e Elevators. Robert W. Ayer, Wayne, heigh t such that its top surface will be below a Mich., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Stinson horizontal plane taken along the upper limit of Aircraft Corporation, Wayne, Mich., a corporation trave l of the tips of said propellers, the arrangement of Michigan. Application April 13, 1935. Serial being such that said main wing plane will handle No . 16,130. 3 claims. [Class 244-80.] th e airstreams in the usual manner of a monoplane. 1. The combination with an aeroplane having a pilot' s compartmen t and an elevator, of a n auxiliary 2,084,790 . Cabin and Window Structure. ta b connected to the elevator so that it is movable Fran k R. Canney, Seattle, Wash., assignor to into different angular positions relatively thereto, means for setting the position of the ta b with respect to the elevator so as to control the latter for aero­ plane trimming purposes, comprising tab raising an d lowering cables connected at one end thereof to the tab and a cable actuating element disposed in the pilot's compartment and connected to the cables at the other end thereof, and a vertically extendin g arm positioned adjacent the mid-portion of the cables and having the upper end thereof pivoted so tha t it is free to swing lengthwise of the being of jointed structure and including two aeroplane, said arm being weighted at its lower elements articulated with respect to each other, an operatin g device, wholly supported by said jointed stru t and mechanically independent of the aero­ plane proper, including two parts movable with respect to each other, one of said parts being mechanically connected to said strut elements, mechanical means for interconnecting the other par t of said device with each of these two strut elements in such manner that relative displace­ Boeing Aircraft Company, Seattle, Wash., a corpora­ ment s of these two parts of the device produce tion of Washington. Application December 16, angula r displacements of the strut elements, and 1936. Serial No. 116,158. 5 claims. [Class 244- means , operative from the aeroplane proper, for 119.] producing displacements of said two parts of the end so that it maintains its vertical position in 1. In an aircraft structure having a generally operatin g device with respect to each other. response to the action of gravity, and having a rounded cross section and elongated shape with a plurality of sheaves at its upper end, said sheaves generally rounded end, structural members dis­ being so arranged and the mid-portions of the 2,083,226 . Girder for Struts or the Like. posed to resist expansive stresses developed by cables being so wrapped around the sheaves that Claude Dornier, Friedrichshafen-on-the-Bodenseo, interna l pressure, and a skin carried by said struc­ when the aeroplane during flight tilts from its Germany , assignor of one-half to Dornier-Metall- tura l members, said structural members being normal flying position and the arm as a result baute n G.m.b.H., Friedrichshafen-on-the-Boden- interrupte d over an appreciable area to afford an swings relatively to the aeroplane the portions of opening, and tension members extending across the cables between the arm and the tab are moved such opening and connecting structural members independently of the portions between the arm a t opposite sides thereof, and disposed substan­ and the actuating element and shift the tab into a tially along geodesic lines, to transmit such stresses position wherein the elevator is controlled so that most directly and substantially entirely in tension. it tends to return the aeroplane to its normal flying 2,086,085 . Aircraft control gear. Gustav position. see, Germany. Application October 18, 1932. Victor Lachmann, George Rudolph Volkert, and Serial No. 638,348. In Germany October 28, 1931. 10 claims. [Class 189-37.] 2,084,502 . Airplane Construction. Thomas 6. A girder comprising a pair of chords tapered W. Rieder, Pittsburgh, Pa. Application April 24, in width towards one end and provided with a 1936. Serial No. 76,161. 2claims. [Class244-45.] pluralit y of spaced substantially parallel longi­ tudinall y extending flanges, a plurality of longi­ tudinally extending webs secured to said flanges an d uniting said chords, said webs being short and overlapped and their spacing being reduced towards said tapered end. 2,083,439 . Airscrew. Alfred Hubert Roy Fedde n and Frank Morgan Owner, Bristol, England, assignors to The Bristol Aeroplane Company, Walte r James Dare, Cricklewood, England, as­ Limited, Bristol, England, a British company. signors to Handley Page, Ltd., London, England. Application July 31, 1935. Serial No. 34,084. In Application October 3, 1935, Serial No. 43,463. Grea t Britain September 21, 1934. 4 claims. I n Great Britain May 14, 1935. 11 claims. [Class [Class 170-173.] 244-42.] 1. A reinforced airscrew blade comprising a 4 . In an aeroplane having a wing and a flap, cylindrical root-portion of comparatively soft means associating the flap with the wing com­ prising a radius link within the wing pivoted at * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United State one end to the wing, two links pivoted at spaced are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the point s on the radius link and at spaced points Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the on the flap, means for limiting the extent and Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. direction of the thrust of said links and means Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied for rotating the radius link. by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1937

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