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U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications 116 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING April, 1936 A NEW FEATURE Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Grante d in the U.S.A. 1. In an aircraft power plant including a hollow said fork being so shaped that the forward end 2,032,370 . Liquid Level Gauge. George R. propeller shaft the hollow of which forms a vent for thereof lies forwardly of the post axis, and a tail Larkin , Dayton, Ohio. Application Jan. 15, 1935, th e engine of the power plant and a controllable wheel axle in said fork having its axis forward of Serial No . 1,904. 8 claims. [Class 73-82.] (Granted pitc h propeller mounted on said shaft, means for tha t portion of the post axis nearest thereto. unde r th e act of Mar. 3, 1883, as amended April 30, operatin g the pitch controlling mechanism of said 1928 ; 370 O. G. 757.) propeller mounted ahead of and concentric with said propeller shaft, and a hollow shaft connecting said operating means with said propeller, embracing a portion of said propeller shaft, both said hollow shafts having radial openings therein for estab­ lishing communication between the atmosphere and th e shaft hollows. 2,032,711 . Crash pad. Howard R. Moles, Kenmore, N. Y., assignor to Curtiss Aeroplane & Motor Company, Inc., a corporation of New York. Application May 11, 1934. Serial No. 725,129. 2 claims. [Class 244-31.] 1. In combination with an aircraft instrument panel adapted to be normally viewed from a point opposite and above the face thereof, a relatively thick, soft, resilient pad attached to said panel, said pad having openings corresponding t o th e panel instruments , and the edges of the pad openings being slanted throughout in a line substantially parallel to the line of sight when viewing said in­ struments , whereby the edges of said pad adjacent 2,032,861 . Process for converting gasoline th e upper portions of said instruments slant away of lo w anti-knoc k rating into gasoline of high from a normal to the panel, and the pad edges anti-knoc k rating . Cornelius B. Watson, Chicago, adjacen t the lower portions of said instruments Ill., assignor t o The Pure Oil Company, Chicago, Ill. overla p normals t o the panel. a corporation of Ohio. Application Sept. 23, 1930. Serial No. 483,846. 3 claims. [Class 196-61.] 1. In a fuel tank, an upstanding tubular guide 3. A non-catalytic process of converting gasolines membe r extending through said tank but not com­ possessing a low anti-knock rating into motor fuels municatin g therewith, a movable member slidable of higher anti-knock rating, which comprises longitudinally within said guide member, a nor­ separatin g such gasoline into a heavy and a light mally inoperative pawl and ratchet device associated fraction, vaporising the heavy fraction and passing with said slidable member, and said guide member, i t through a heated conversion zone wherein the magneti c flotation means outside of and guided vapours attain a conversion temperature, imme­ vertically by said guide member adapted to move diately contacting the products discharged from the said pawl and ratchet device into positive relative conversion zone with a relatively cool oil boiling operative engagement when the pawl piece comes substantiall y within the gas oil range whereby to within the influence of the field of said magnetic abruptl y reduce the temperature of the cracked mean s and thereby limit the upward range of vapour s to a temperature below tha t a t which con­ movemen t of said slidable member and means for version takes place, fractionating the resulting indicating th e movement of said movable member. product s to separate the fraction boiling within 2,032,718 . Tailwheel. Donald C. Rowe, th e gasoline range from the higher boiling hydro­ Buffalo, N. Y., assignor to Curtiss Aeroplane & 2,032,682 . Crankcase vent. Werner J. carbons , effecting the separation of the initial Motor Company, Inc., a corporation of New York. Blanchard, Kenmore, N. Y., assignor to Curtiss gasoline into light and heavy fractions by indirect Application Jan. 3, 1933. Serial No. 649,799. Aeroplane & Motor Company, Inc., a corporation of hea t interchange with the vapours undergoing 1 claim. [Class 244-2.] New York. Application Nov. 21, 1934. Serial No. fractionation, condensing and collecting th e vapours In aircraft including a fuselage, a bearing in the 754,192. 9 claims. [Class 170-172.] released from the top of the fractionating zone, rearwar d portion of said fuselage having its axis passing high boiling liquid oil from the fractionating slanted downwardly and forwardly relative to the zone through a heating and vaporising section, and fuselage axis, a post mounted in said bearing for passing the vapours to the conversion zone. rotation , a tail wheel fork mounted on said post, * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 8 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1936

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

116 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING April, 1936 A NEW FEATURE Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Grante d in the U.S.A. 1. In an aircraft power plant including a hollow said fork being so shaped that the forward end 2,032,370 . Liquid Level Gauge. George R. propeller shaft the hollow of which forms a vent for thereof lies forwardly of the post axis, and a tail Larkin , Dayton, Ohio. Application Jan. 15, 1935, th e engine of the power plant and a controllable wheel axle in said fork having its axis forward of Serial No . 1,904. 8 claims. [Class 73-82.] (Granted pitc h propeller mounted on said shaft, means for tha t portion of the post axis nearest thereto. unde r th e act of Mar. 3, 1883, as amended April 30, operatin g the pitch controlling mechanism of said 1928 ; 370 O. G. 757.) propeller mounted ahead of and concentric with said propeller shaft, and a hollow shaft connecting said operating means with said propeller, embracing a portion of said propeller shaft, both said hollow shafts having radial openings therein for estab­ lishing communication between the atmosphere and th e shaft hollows. 2,032,711 . Crash pad. Howard R. Moles, Kenmore, N. Y., assignor to Curtiss Aeroplane & Motor Company, Inc., a corporation of New York. Application May 11, 1934. Serial No. 725,129. 2 claims. [Class 244-31.] 1. In combination with an aircraft instrument panel adapted to be normally viewed from a point opposite and above the face thereof, a relatively thick, soft, resilient pad attached to said panel, said pad having openings corresponding t o th e panel instruments , and the edges of the pad openings being slanted throughout in a line substantially parallel to the line of sight when viewing said in­ struments , whereby the edges of said pad adjacent 2,032,861 . Process for converting gasoline th e upper portions of said instruments slant away of lo w anti-knoc k rating into gasoline of high from a normal to the panel, and the pad edges anti-knoc k rating . Cornelius B. Watson, Chicago, adjacen t the lower portions of said instruments Ill., assignor t o The Pure Oil Company, Chicago, Ill. overla p normals t o the panel. a corporation of Ohio. Application Sept. 23, 1930. Serial No. 483,846. 3 claims. [Class 196-61.] 1. In a fuel tank, an upstanding tubular guide 3. A non-catalytic process of converting gasolines membe r extending through said tank but not com­ possessing a low anti-knock rating into motor fuels municatin g therewith, a movable member slidable of higher anti-knock rating, which comprises longitudinally within said guide member, a nor­ separatin g such gasoline into a heavy and a light mally inoperative pawl and ratchet device associated fraction, vaporising the heavy fraction and passing with said slidable member, and said guide member, i t through a heated conversion zone wherein the magneti c flotation means outside of and guided vapours attain a conversion temperature, imme­ vertically by said guide member adapted to move diately contacting the products discharged from the said pawl and ratchet device into positive relative conversion zone with a relatively cool oil boiling operative engagement when the pawl piece comes substantiall y within the gas oil range whereby to within the influence of the field of said magnetic abruptl y reduce the temperature of the cracked mean s and thereby limit the upward range of vapour s to a temperature below tha t a t which con­ movemen t of said slidable member and means for version takes place, fractionating the resulting indicating th e movement of said movable member. product s to separate the fraction boiling within 2,032,718 . Tailwheel. Donald C. Rowe, th e gasoline range from the higher boiling hydro­ Buffalo, N. Y., assignor to Curtiss Aeroplane & 2,032,682 . Crankcase vent. Werner J. carbons , effecting the separation of the initial Motor Company, Inc., a corporation of New York. Blanchard, Kenmore, N. Y., assignor to Curtiss gasoline into light and heavy fractions by indirect Application Jan. 3, 1933. Serial No. 649,799. Aeroplane & Motor Company, Inc., a corporation of hea t interchange with the vapours undergoing 1 claim. [Class 244-2.] New York. Application Nov. 21, 1934. Serial No. fractionation, condensing and collecting th e vapours In aircraft including a fuselage, a bearing in the 754,192. 9 claims. [Class 170-172.] released from the top of the fractionating zone, rearwar d portion of said fuselage having its axis passing high boiling liquid oil from the fractionating slanted downwardly and forwardly relative to the zone through a heating and vaporising section, and fuselage axis, a post mounted in said bearing for passing the vapours to the conversion zone. rotation , a tail wheel fork mounted on said post, * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1936

There are no references for this article.