U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING 76 February, 1939 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,125,361 . Safety Device for Aeroplanes. opposite directions along said structure, and means Kar l Schwarzler, Warnemunde, Germany. Applica­ a t opposite ends of said structure for securing a tion November 15, 1935. Serial No. 50,016. In plan e in launching position at cither end of the Germany, November 17, 1934. 6 Claims. [Class structur e and adapted to not obstruct the lauching 244-87.] of the plane from the end of th e structure a t which 1. In an aeroplane, an elevator, a mechanism th e plane is not secured. tinder th e pilot's control for operating said elevator, and self-acting means for adjusting the righting effect of the elevator in response to excessive accelerations and retardations of the aeroplane, said adjusting means comprising an auxiliary surface associated with the elevator, and inertia controlled means for indirectly actuating said auxiliary surface. 2,126,408 . Engine Synchronism Indicator. thi s application September 17, 1925. Serial No. Adolf Urfer, New Rochelle, N.Y., assignor to 41,002. 2 Claims. [Claims 175-183.] Pioneer Instrument Company, Incorporated, 1. Means for determining the speed of rotation Brooklyn, N.Y., a corporation of New York. of a continuously rotating element, comprising a Application September 27, 1930. Serial No . 484,919. calibrated element continouusly vibrating at a Renewed December 23, 1936. 11 Claims. [Class 2,125,882 . Aircraft Construction. Henry A. know n frequency, means operated by said cali­ 177-311.] Berliner, Washington, D.C. Application March 16, brate d vibrating element for producing electrical 1. The combination with a plurality of internal 1937. Serial No. 131,313. 5 Claims. [Class 244-124.] impulses of the same frequency as that of the combustion engines, of means for indicating the 1. In airplane construction, an elongated sec­ vibratin g element, means operated by the rotating synchronism thereof including means operated by tional member comprising an outer skin, a corru­ element for also producing electrical impulses, the gate d sheet secured to said skin, and a flanged latte r impulses having a frequency corresponding connecting member having a portion lying in t o the speed of rotation of the rotating element, contac t with and secured to said skin and another stroboscopic means operated by the impulses pro­ portion shaped t o conform with and secured to said duced by both of said means for furnishing an corrugated sheet. indication of synchronism between said frequencies and , hence, between said rotating and vibrating element, means for adjusting said vibrating element unti l its frequency is indicated by said stroboscopic mean s to be the same as the frequency of the im­ pulses produced by th e rotating element, and means for indicating terms of the speed of said rotating element. 2,126,703 . Resilient Connection. Fritz Schmidt, Harburg-Wilhelmsburg, Germany, 2,125,752 . Removable Roof for the Cockpits assignor to Metalastik, Ltd., Leicester, England, of Aircraft. Raymond Saulnier, Paris, France. a British firm. Application September 13, 1937. Application December 28, 1936. Serial No. 117,946. Serial No. 163,634. In Germany October 25, 1935. I n France December 27, 1935. 7 Claims. [Class 4 Claims. [Class 287-85.] 244-121.] (Granted under the provisions of sec. 14, and at said engines for producing low tension Ac t of March 2, 1927: 357 O. G. 5). electrical impulses in synchronism with the rota­ 1. In combination with an aircraft having a tion of said engines, means a t said indicating means cockpit, a roof normally slidable above said cock­ and remote from said engines but having electrical pi t and capable of being operated when in flight, connections with said low tension producing means mean s operative from the inside of said cockpit for translating certain of said low tension impulses for displacing said roof, said roof being detachable into high tension alternating currents, whereby instantaneousl y from said airplane, and means, the connections between the low tension and high operative from the inside of said cockpit, for detach­ tension producing means ma y be effectively shielded ing said roof from said airplane. to prevent radio interference without weakening the high tension currents, means adjacent and electric­ ally connected to said high tension means an d perio­ dically illuminated by spark discharges produced therein by said high tension alternating currents in synchronism with certain of said engines, means responsive to the other of said low tension impulses and drivably connected to said illuminating means for rotating said illuminating means in synchronism with another of said engines whereby said illuminat­ 1. A suspension for aircraft engines or the like, ing means appear to be illuminated continuously comprising a bearing eye, a shaft projecting into and stationary when the engines are rotating in th e eye, concentrically apertured means encircling synchronism, and means for shielding the electrical th e shaft and disposed generally radial within the connections between th e engines and the indicating eye with alternating means carried by the shaft means. an d bearing respectively, rubber between said encircling means and vulcanized thereto, stiff 2,125,409 . Engine Synchroniser and Tacho­ spacing members between the radially inner edges 2,125,804 . Catapult. William M. Fellers, meter . Adolf Urfer, Yonkers, N.Y., assignor to of the encircling means on the shaft, and similar Washington, D.C., and Frederick B. Gross, Rosslyn, Pioneer Instrument Company, Inc., Brooklyn, N.Y., spacing members between the radially edges of the Va. Application May 31, 1928. Serial No. 281,846. a corporation of New York. Original application encircling means on the bearing, said spacing 32 Claims. [Class 244-63.] (Granted under the Act Januar y 18, 1930. Serial No. 421,855. Divided and member s being radially spaced from the adjacent of March 3, 1883, as amended April 30, 1928; 370 O. G. 757.) edges of the encircling means on the bearing and * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States shaft respectively and from the rubber and having 1. In a device for launching an airplane, a are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the grooves in their sides adjacent the rubber, and catapul t structure adapted to be secured upon a Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the rubbe r elements in such grooves with such elements relatively rigid base, a launching track, means for Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. disposed in radially spaced relation to the edges of rigidly securing said track upon said structure, Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied th e encircling means and the first mentioned rubber. mean s for launching an airplane in either one of by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 11 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1939

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030443
Publisher site
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Abstract

AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING 76 February, 1939 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,125,361 . Safety Device for Aeroplanes. opposite directions along said structure, and means Kar l Schwarzler, Warnemunde, Germany. Applica­ a t opposite ends of said structure for securing a tion November 15, 1935. Serial No. 50,016. In plan e in launching position at cither end of the Germany, November 17, 1934. 6 Claims. [Class structur e and adapted to not obstruct the lauching 244-87.] of the plane from the end of th e structure a t which 1. In an aeroplane, an elevator, a mechanism th e plane is not secured. tinder th e pilot's control for operating said elevator, and self-acting means for adjusting the righting effect of the elevator in response to excessive accelerations and retardations of the aeroplane, said adjusting means comprising an auxiliary surface associated with the elevator, and inertia controlled means for indirectly actuating said auxiliary surface. 2,126,408 . Engine Synchronism Indicator. thi s application September 17, 1925. Serial No. Adolf Urfer, New Rochelle, N.Y., assignor to 41,002. 2 Claims. [Claims 175-183.] Pioneer Instrument Company, Incorporated, 1. Means for determining the speed of rotation Brooklyn, N.Y., a corporation of New York. of a continuously rotating element, comprising a Application September 27, 1930. Serial No . 484,919. calibrated element continouusly vibrating at a Renewed December 23, 1936. 11 Claims. [Class 2,125,882 . Aircraft Construction. Henry A. know n frequency, means operated by said cali­ 177-311.] Berliner, Washington, D.C. Application March 16, brate d vibrating element for producing electrical 1. The combination with a plurality of internal 1937. Serial No. 131,313. 5 Claims. [Class 244-124.] impulses of the same frequency as that of the combustion engines, of means for indicating the 1. In airplane construction, an elongated sec­ vibratin g element, means operated by the rotating synchronism thereof including means operated by tional member comprising an outer skin, a corru­ element for also producing electrical impulses, the gate d sheet secured to said skin, and a flanged latte r impulses having a frequency corresponding connecting member having a portion lying in t o the speed of rotation of the rotating element, contac t with and secured to said skin and another stroboscopic means operated by the impulses pro­ portion shaped t o conform with and secured to said duced by both of said means for furnishing an corrugated sheet. indication of synchronism between said frequencies and , hence, between said rotating and vibrating element, means for adjusting said vibrating element unti l its frequency is indicated by said stroboscopic mean s to be the same as the frequency of the im­ pulses produced by th e rotating element, and means for indicating terms of the speed of said rotating element. 2,126,703 . Resilient Connection. Fritz Schmidt, Harburg-Wilhelmsburg, Germany, 2,125,752 . Removable Roof for the Cockpits assignor to Metalastik, Ltd., Leicester, England, of Aircraft. Raymond Saulnier, Paris, France. a British firm. Application September 13, 1937. Application December 28, 1936. Serial No. 117,946. Serial No. 163,634. In Germany October 25, 1935. I n France December 27, 1935. 7 Claims. [Class 4 Claims. [Class 287-85.] 244-121.] (Granted under the provisions of sec. 14, and at said engines for producing low tension Ac t of March 2, 1927: 357 O. G. 5). electrical impulses in synchronism with the rota­ 1. In combination with an aircraft having a tion of said engines, means a t said indicating means cockpit, a roof normally slidable above said cock­ and remote from said engines but having electrical pi t and capable of being operated when in flight, connections with said low tension producing means mean s operative from the inside of said cockpit for translating certain of said low tension impulses for displacing said roof, said roof being detachable into high tension alternating currents, whereby instantaneousl y from said airplane, and means, the connections between the low tension and high operative from the inside of said cockpit, for detach­ tension producing means ma y be effectively shielded ing said roof from said airplane. to prevent radio interference without weakening the high tension currents, means adjacent and electric­ ally connected to said high tension means an d perio­ dically illuminated by spark discharges produced therein by said high tension alternating currents in synchronism with certain of said engines, means responsive to the other of said low tension impulses and drivably connected to said illuminating means for rotating said illuminating means in synchronism with another of said engines whereby said illuminat­ 1. A suspension for aircraft engines or the like, ing means appear to be illuminated continuously comprising a bearing eye, a shaft projecting into and stationary when the engines are rotating in th e eye, concentrically apertured means encircling synchronism, and means for shielding the electrical th e shaft and disposed generally radial within the connections between th e engines and the indicating eye with alternating means carried by the shaft means. an d bearing respectively, rubber between said encircling means and vulcanized thereto, stiff 2,125,409 . Engine Synchroniser and Tacho­ spacing members between the radially inner edges 2,125,804 . Catapult. William M. Fellers, meter . Adolf Urfer, Yonkers, N.Y., assignor to of the encircling means on the shaft, and similar Washington, D.C., and Frederick B. Gross, Rosslyn, Pioneer Instrument Company, Inc., Brooklyn, N.Y., spacing members between the radially edges of the Va. Application May 31, 1928. Serial No. 281,846. a corporation of New York. Original application encircling means on the bearing, said spacing 32 Claims. [Class 244-63.] (Granted under the Act Januar y 18, 1930. Serial No. 421,855. Divided and member s being radially spaced from the adjacent of March 3, 1883, as amended April 30, 1928; 370 O. G. 757.) edges of the encircling means on the bearing and * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States shaft respectively and from the rubber and having 1. In a device for launching an airplane, a are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the grooves in their sides adjacent the rubber, and catapul t structure adapted to be secured upon a Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the rubbe r elements in such grooves with such elements relatively rigid base, a launching track, means for Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. disposed in radially spaced relation to the edges of rigidly securing said track upon said structure, Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied th e encircling means and the first mentioned rubber. mean s for launching an airplane in either one of by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1939

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