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U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications an accessory drive compressed air supply conduit, a bleed from said main compressor on the air outflow U.S. Patent Specifications side of an air compressing portion thereof, first duct means connecting said bleed and the intake of said air motor for air to be compressed thereby and operable These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the to supply air from said bleed to said air motor, an air discharge aperture connected to said air motor for Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies discharge of air supplied to said air motor for driving of the full specifications can be obtained, price 25 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 2,691,497. Combined Aircraft Hull and Water and pivotally engaged at their outer extremities to Rudder. Maurice G. Scheider and Irvin E. Kass, said wheel-carrying element, one of said springs coiled Baltimore County, Md., assignors to The Glenn L. in the clockwise direction from its centre outward, the other said spring coiled in the counter-clockwise direc­ Martin Company, Middle River, Md. Application tion from its centre outward for providing resilient April 10, 1951. it, valve means operable to close said air discharge aperture, and second duct means connecting the dis­ A steering device for watercraft having a hull charge of said air motor for air compressed thereby bottom with sides sloping inwardly and downwardly and said accessory drive compressed air supply con­ from the chine to the keel comprising a rudder form­ duit for flow to said accessory drive compressed air ing in retracted position a portion of said bottom supply conduit from said air motor of air compressed between said chine and keel adjacent one end thereof, thereby while said air motor is being driven by said means connecting the forward end of said rudder to engine. said bottom for swinging movement about a hinge axis, said hinge axis sloping forwardly from said chine to said keel in a plane substantially parallel with the absorption and snubbing of wheel shocks in both 2,692,478. Turbine Burner incorporating Remov­ plane of said bottom, said rudder being swingablc directions, and a flat synthetic rubber element having able Burner Liner. Henry C. Hill, Seattle, Wash., outwardly and downwardly about said axis into an high hysteresis characteristics disposed within the assignor to Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, Wash. extended operative position wherein it lies substantial­ coils of said flat coil springs and having their flat faces Application February 24, 1951. ly in a vertical plane whereby planing effects causing in contact therewith, the surfaces of said synthetic adverse pitching moments about the craft's centre of A gas turbine burner comprising a unitary tubular rubber element having recesses filled with a lubricant gravity are minimized, means for deflecting said rudder burner liner including a side wall portion and an in­ for preventing excessive heating due to friction as said tegral end wall portion substantially closing one of the coil springs slidingly compress said synthetic rubber element as said coil springs are subjected to external loads. 2,692,475. Rocket Steering Means. Edwin H. Hull, Scotia, N.Y., assignor, by mesne assignments, to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army. Application October 11, 1950. A rocket provided with auxiliary automatically actuated steering vanes to control and stabilize the rocket during the initial stages of flight, said vanes being mounted outside the combustion nozzle and ex­ tending into the blast zone, said vanes being formed of a thin consumable heat conductive material, each vane being provided with an entry conduit and an exit conduit, and being further provided with a means for circulating a coolant fluid within the body of said vane, a source of coolant fluid connected with said entry to produce a turning moment, and locking means for ends of such side wall portion and the side wall por­ conduit, valve means positioned in one of said con­ holding said rudder in closed position to complete the tion being open at its other end, an air supply duct duits, said valve controlling the circulation of said contour of said hull bottom. encircling the closed end of said burner liner, a gas discharge conduit spaced lengthwise from said air 2,692,096. Apparatus for Transporting Personnel supply duct toward the open end of said burner liner, and Equipment. Edwin B. Pierce, New Castle, Del., a fuel supply nozzle projecting inwardly from said air assignor, by mesne assignments, to All American supply duct and having its tip directed toward said Engineering Company, Wilmington, Del. Applica­ gas discharge conduit and engageable with said burner tion August 6, 1951. liner for locating and anchoring the closed end of said burner liner transversely of its length relative to said An aircraft having a fuselage and spaced apart air supply duct, a spark plug projecting inwardly from landing struts having planing surface members, a said air supply duct and engageable with the periphery track extending longitudinally along the fore and aft of said burner liner for locating and anchoring said axis of the fuselage between the struts, a detachable burner liner against movement lengthwise of said air landing barge pod having bow and stern rollers en- supply duct, a removable burner conduit interposed gageable with the track with the bottom thereof above between said air supply duct and said gas discharge the plane of said planing surface members, and winch conduit of a length less than the distance between said and cable means supported in the aircraft connected to spark plug and said gas discharge conduit, discon- the said pod for lowering the pod to the water between nectible joint means securing together said air supply duct and the adjacent end of said burner conduit and securing together said gas discharge conduit and the adjacent end of said burner conduit to enable said burner conduit to be removed from between said air fluid through said conduits and within the body of supply duct and said gas discharge conduit, and said vanes, said valve means being operative to close spacer means interengaged between but not securing off the circulation of said coolant fluid when the together said burner liner side wall portion and one of rocket has attained a predetermined velocity thereby said conduits and holding the open end of said burner permitting said vanes to be consumed. liner against appreciable movement transversely of such conduit. 2,692,476. Gas Turbine Engine Air Starting Motor constituting Air Supply Mechanism. Ellsworth A. Schaal and John A. Lawler, Seattle, Wash., assignors the planing surface members to release the same from to Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, Wash. Applica­ the fuselage while the aircraft is planing forward over tion November 13, 1950. the water surface. In combination, a main compressor and gas turbine 2,692,098. Shock-absorbing Landing Gear. Edgar engine installation having an air operated starting Schmued and Duane C. Olmore, Los Angeles, Calif., motor capable of being driven to compress air, drive assignors to North American Aviation, Inc. Applica­ mechanism interconnecting said air motor and said tion June 19, 1950. gas turbine engine, operable to effect driving of said engine by said air motor for starting said engine, and In aircraft, the combination with a wheel-carrying said drive mechanism being operable when said en­ element pivotally mounted upon the aircraft, of re- gine is running under its own power to effect driving silient means including a pair of oppositely wound flat of said air motor by said engine for compressing air, coil springs anchored at their centres to the aircraft 66 Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 27 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032530
Publisher site
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Abstract

an accessory drive compressed air supply conduit, a bleed from said main compressor on the air outflow U.S. Patent Specifications side of an air compressing portion thereof, first duct means connecting said bleed and the intake of said air motor for air to be compressed thereby and operable These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the to supply air from said bleed to said air motor, an air discharge aperture connected to said air motor for Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies discharge of air supplied to said air motor for driving of the full specifications can be obtained, price 25 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 2,691,497. Combined Aircraft Hull and Water and pivotally engaged at their outer extremities to Rudder. Maurice G. Scheider and Irvin E. Kass, said wheel-carrying element, one of said springs coiled Baltimore County, Md., assignors to The Glenn L. in the clockwise direction from its centre outward, the other said spring coiled in the counter-clockwise direc­ Martin Company, Middle River, Md. Application tion from its centre outward for providing resilient April 10, 1951. it, valve means operable to close said air discharge aperture, and second duct means connecting the dis­ A steering device for watercraft having a hull charge of said air motor for air compressed thereby bottom with sides sloping inwardly and downwardly and said accessory drive compressed air supply con­ from the chine to the keel comprising a rudder form­ duit for flow to said accessory drive compressed air ing in retracted position a portion of said bottom supply conduit from said air motor of air compressed between said chine and keel adjacent one end thereof, thereby while said air motor is being driven by said means connecting the forward end of said rudder to engine. said bottom for swinging movement about a hinge axis, said hinge axis sloping forwardly from said chine to said keel in a plane substantially parallel with the absorption and snubbing of wheel shocks in both 2,692,478. Turbine Burner incorporating Remov­ plane of said bottom, said rudder being swingablc directions, and a flat synthetic rubber element having able Burner Liner. Henry C. Hill, Seattle, Wash., outwardly and downwardly about said axis into an high hysteresis characteristics disposed within the assignor to Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, Wash. extended operative position wherein it lies substantial­ coils of said flat coil springs and having their flat faces Application February 24, 1951. ly in a vertical plane whereby planing effects causing in contact therewith, the surfaces of said synthetic adverse pitching moments about the craft's centre of A gas turbine burner comprising a unitary tubular rubber element having recesses filled with a lubricant gravity are minimized, means for deflecting said rudder burner liner including a side wall portion and an in­ for preventing excessive heating due to friction as said tegral end wall portion substantially closing one of the coil springs slidingly compress said synthetic rubber element as said coil springs are subjected to external loads. 2,692,475. Rocket Steering Means. Edwin H. Hull, Scotia, N.Y., assignor, by mesne assignments, to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army. Application October 11, 1950. A rocket provided with auxiliary automatically actuated steering vanes to control and stabilize the rocket during the initial stages of flight, said vanes being mounted outside the combustion nozzle and ex­ tending into the blast zone, said vanes being formed of a thin consumable heat conductive material, each vane being provided with an entry conduit and an exit conduit, and being further provided with a means for circulating a coolant fluid within the body of said vane, a source of coolant fluid connected with said entry to produce a turning moment, and locking means for ends of such side wall portion and the side wall por­ conduit, valve means positioned in one of said con­ holding said rudder in closed position to complete the tion being open at its other end, an air supply duct duits, said valve controlling the circulation of said contour of said hull bottom. encircling the closed end of said burner liner, a gas discharge conduit spaced lengthwise from said air 2,692,096. Apparatus for Transporting Personnel supply duct toward the open end of said burner liner, and Equipment. Edwin B. Pierce, New Castle, Del., a fuel supply nozzle projecting inwardly from said air assignor, by mesne assignments, to All American supply duct and having its tip directed toward said Engineering Company, Wilmington, Del. Applica­ gas discharge conduit and engageable with said burner tion August 6, 1951. liner for locating and anchoring the closed end of said burner liner transversely of its length relative to said An aircraft having a fuselage and spaced apart air supply duct, a spark plug projecting inwardly from landing struts having planing surface members, a said air supply duct and engageable with the periphery track extending longitudinally along the fore and aft of said burner liner for locating and anchoring said axis of the fuselage between the struts, a detachable burner liner against movement lengthwise of said air landing barge pod having bow and stern rollers en- supply duct, a removable burner conduit interposed gageable with the track with the bottom thereof above between said air supply duct and said gas discharge the plane of said planing surface members, and winch conduit of a length less than the distance between said and cable means supported in the aircraft connected to spark plug and said gas discharge conduit, discon- the said pod for lowering the pod to the water between nectible joint means securing together said air supply duct and the adjacent end of said burner conduit and securing together said gas discharge conduit and the adjacent end of said burner conduit to enable said burner conduit to be removed from between said air fluid through said conduits and within the body of supply duct and said gas discharge conduit, and said vanes, said valve means being operative to close spacer means interengaged between but not securing off the circulation of said coolant fluid when the together said burner liner side wall portion and one of rocket has attained a predetermined velocity thereby said conduits and holding the open end of said burner permitting said vanes to be consumed. liner against appreciable movement transversely of such conduit. 2,692,476. Gas Turbine Engine Air Starting Motor constituting Air Supply Mechanism. Ellsworth A. Schaal and John A. Lawler, Seattle, Wash., assignors the planing surface members to release the same from to Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, Wash. Applica­ the fuselage while the aircraft is planing forward over tion November 13, 1950. the water surface. In combination, a main compressor and gas turbine 2,692,098. Shock-absorbing Landing Gear. Edgar engine installation having an air operated starting Schmued and Duane C. Olmore, Los Angeles, Calif., motor capable of being driven to compress air, drive assignors to North American Aviation, Inc. Applica­ mechanism interconnecting said air motor and said tion June 19, 1950. gas turbine engine, operable to effect driving of said engine by said air motor for starting said engine, and In aircraft, the combination with a wheel-carrying said drive mechanism being operable when said en­ element pivotally mounted upon the aircraft, of re- gine is running under its own power to effect driving silient means including a pair of oppositely wound flat of said air motor by said engine for compressing air, coil springs anchored at their centres to the aircraft 66 Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1955

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