U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications 90 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING March, 1938 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,100,354 . Treatment with Hydrogenating tion of New York. Application July 26, 1933. Gase s of Distillable Carbonaceous Materials. Serial No. 682,181. 3 claims. [Class 123-188.] Mathia s Pier, Heidelberg, and Walter Simon and 1. In combination with an aluminium or Georg Grassl, Ludwigshafcn-on-the-Rhine, Ger­ aluminium base alloy engine element having at many , assignors to Standard-I. G. Company, least one valve port therein, said element having a Linden, N.J., a corporation of Delaware. Applica­ relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, a tion March 9, 1935. Serial No. 10,336. In Ger­ valve seat secured within said port, said valve seat many , March 10, 1934. 1 Claim. [Class 190-53.] comprising a metal ring secured to the inner peri­ A process for th e treatmen t of distillable carbon­ pher y of said port, a surface metal layer on said aceous materials with added hydrogen or an added metal ring of a wear and oxidation resistant metal gas containin g free hydrogen a t an elevated tempera­ having a relatively low coefficient of thermal expan­ tur e between 200 deg. and 700 deg. C. an d a pressure sion said metal ring being of a metal having a in excess of 20 atmospheres , having a t least 100 cubic 2,100,620 . Valve Insert. Gottfried Wirrer metres of hydrogen present per ton of carbonaceous and William E Day, Jr., Plainfield, N.J., assignors t o Mack Manufacturing Corporation, Long Island City, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware. Application March 25, 1937. Serial No. 132,898. 4 claims. [Class 75-124.] 1. An alloy particularly adapted for valve insert coefficient of thermal expansion intermediate be­ materia l comprising approximately 39·0-41·0 per tween , and substantially different from, tha t of said cen t nickel, 1·5-2·0 per cent carbon, 0·3-0·6 per cent aluminiu m or aluminium base alloy and that of manganese, 0·5-1·0 per cent silicon, 0·75-1·25 per cen t aluminium, and the remainder iron. said wear and oxidation resistant surface metal. 2,101,145 . Adjustable Gunner's Seat. John 2,102,590 . Aircraft Construction. Reid B. Gray, Dundalk, and Edwin L. Zivi, Baltimore, Md., G. Lee, Avon, Conn., assignor, by mesne assign­ assignors to The Glenn L. Martin Company, Balti­ ments , to United Aircraft Corporation, a corpora­ more , Md. Application December 2, 1936. Serial tion of Delaware. Application November 10, 1933, No . 113,773. 9 claims. [Class 244-135.] Serial No. 697,423. 19 claims. [Class 89-37·5.] material treated, which comprises effecting said 1. A combined gun support and gunner's seat, treatmen t in the presence as a catalyst of a line comprising a swivel support, a seat, means to pivot- granula r free metal selected from the group consist­ ally suspend said seat from said support, a gun ing of aluminium, magnalium and aluminium standard , means to pivotally mount said standard bronze, finely distributed in the carbonaceous material treated, and between 0·01 and 1 per cent with reference to the amount of the said carbon­ aceous material of a non-metallic substance com­ prising free halogen or hydrogen halide, th e halogen portion of said non-metallic substance being selected 1. A petroleum containing means including a from the group consisting of chlorine and bromine. rigid supporting enclosure and a collapsible en­ closure positioned within said supporting enclosure, 2,100,411 . Method of Increasing the Cor­ th e oute r dimensions of th e said collapsible enclosure rosio n Resistance of Aluminium Alloys and being greater than the inner dimensions of the said Product s Resulting Therefrom. Otto Reuleaux, supportin g enclosure. Hanover, Germany, assignor to Vereinigte Leicht- metall-Werke Gesellschaft mit beschrankter Haf- 2,102,817 . Fuselage Construction. Fred­ tung , Hanover, Germany, a corporation of Germany. erick R. Weymouth, Buffalo, N.Y., assignor, by No Drawing. Application October 15, 1935. Serial mesn e assignments, to Curtiss-Wright Corporation, No. 45, 120. In Germany, October 16, 1934. a corporation of New York. Application April 4, 4 claims. [Class 148-32.] 1935. Serial No. 14,550. 5 claims. [Class 244- 1. The process for producing a high strength 119.] on said seat, and means carried by said scat for integral corrosion resistant aluminium article con­ limiting the movements of said gun standard to a 2 . In monocoque fuselage construction, a joint taining an appreciable amount of copper and having predetermine d path with respect to the seat. adapte d for the connection of two unit fuselage a surface hardness greater than and a corrosion panels, one of the said panels comprising a skin resistance substantially equal to that of pure section braced circumferentially and adapted to 2,101,542 . Method of Compressing Wood. aluminium which comprises welding a very thin assume principally shear loads, the other of said laye r of pure aluminium to a core of aluminium- Rober t N. Hartzell, Piqua, Ohio, assignor to Hart- panel s comprising a skin section braced longitudin­ zell Industries, Inc., Piqua, Ohio, a corporation of copper alloy of the age-hardening type to form a ally by continuous stringers and transversely by Delaware. Application August 2, 1935. Serial composite article having (1) a high strength, corrod- formers provided with apertures at one end and No . 34,377. 1 claim. [Class 144-309.] ible core, (2) a low strength, corrosion resistant forming with a similarly provided adjacent edge of coating, and (3) a bond containing copper and Th e method of making a laminated propeller th e said skin section a half of the said joint, the uniting said core and said coating and having a comprising forming strips of wood of tapering thick­ second said panel adapted principally to assume thinness approximating that of a conventional ness, heating and compressing the strips to produce compressive and tensile loads, the first said panel bond ; heat treating said composite article at an graduate d degrees of compression with the greatest provided with a longeron attached to the said skin annealing temperature beyond the usual annealing degree a t the thicker portions of th e strips, th e heat­ section and circumferential bracing, having an time for a period u p to 30 minutes to cause accentu­ ing and compression to which the strips are sub­ attache d bracket fitting and adapted to form there­ ate d diffusion of said copper throughout said coat­ jected being carried out at a temperature of about with a second half of the said joint, apertures in the ing ; stopping said heating just prior to th e occur­ 300 deg. F. , a t a time of about a minute and a half said bracket fitting adapted to align with those of rence of the copper in th e surface skin of said coat­ an d a maximum pressure of abou t 700 lb. pe r sq. in., one of the said formers, apertures in the edges of ing whereby the bond and coating substantially so as to permanently compress the fibres progress- bot h said skin sections and the said longeron, and disappear and an integral article is formed having ively to various degrees a t various points along the fastening means adapted to engage the said aper­ high strength and having copper diffused substanti­ ture s in assembled relationship of the two panels. ally throughout the same except in the surface skin which is practically devoid of copper and which ha s a hardness greater tha n tha t of pure aluminium an d a corrosion resistance practically that of pure aluminium. lengt h of each strip while maintaining the strength of the fibres, and gluing the strips together to form a propeller blade with the denser portions of the * The above abstracts or patents granted in the United States blade being used for the hub portion. are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the 2,101,970 . Valve Seat. William A. Wissler, Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. Flushing, N.Y., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation, a corpora­ by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 10 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1938

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030294
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Abstract

90 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING March, 1938 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,100,354 . Treatment with Hydrogenating tion of New York. Application July 26, 1933. Gase s of Distillable Carbonaceous Materials. Serial No. 682,181. 3 claims. [Class 123-188.] Mathia s Pier, Heidelberg, and Walter Simon and 1. In combination with an aluminium or Georg Grassl, Ludwigshafcn-on-the-Rhine, Ger­ aluminium base alloy engine element having at many , assignors to Standard-I. G. Company, least one valve port therein, said element having a Linden, N.J., a corporation of Delaware. Applica­ relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, a tion March 9, 1935. Serial No. 10,336. In Ger­ valve seat secured within said port, said valve seat many , March 10, 1934. 1 Claim. [Class 190-53.] comprising a metal ring secured to the inner peri­ A process for th e treatmen t of distillable carbon­ pher y of said port, a surface metal layer on said aceous materials with added hydrogen or an added metal ring of a wear and oxidation resistant metal gas containin g free hydrogen a t an elevated tempera­ having a relatively low coefficient of thermal expan­ tur e between 200 deg. and 700 deg. C. an d a pressure sion said metal ring being of a metal having a in excess of 20 atmospheres , having a t least 100 cubic 2,100,620 . Valve Insert. Gottfried Wirrer metres of hydrogen present per ton of carbonaceous and William E Day, Jr., Plainfield, N.J., assignors t o Mack Manufacturing Corporation, Long Island City, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware. Application March 25, 1937. Serial No. 132,898. 4 claims. [Class 75-124.] 1. An alloy particularly adapted for valve insert coefficient of thermal expansion intermediate be­ materia l comprising approximately 39·0-41·0 per tween , and substantially different from, tha t of said cen t nickel, 1·5-2·0 per cent carbon, 0·3-0·6 per cent aluminiu m or aluminium base alloy and that of manganese, 0·5-1·0 per cent silicon, 0·75-1·25 per cen t aluminium, and the remainder iron. said wear and oxidation resistant surface metal. 2,101,145 . Adjustable Gunner's Seat. John 2,102,590 . Aircraft Construction. Reid B. Gray, Dundalk, and Edwin L. Zivi, Baltimore, Md., G. Lee, Avon, Conn., assignor, by mesne assign­ assignors to The Glenn L. Martin Company, Balti­ ments , to United Aircraft Corporation, a corpora­ more , Md. Application December 2, 1936. Serial tion of Delaware. Application November 10, 1933, No . 113,773. 9 claims. [Class 244-135.] Serial No. 697,423. 19 claims. [Class 89-37·5.] material treated, which comprises effecting said 1. A combined gun support and gunner's seat, treatmen t in the presence as a catalyst of a line comprising a swivel support, a seat, means to pivot- granula r free metal selected from the group consist­ ally suspend said seat from said support, a gun ing of aluminium, magnalium and aluminium standard , means to pivotally mount said standard bronze, finely distributed in the carbonaceous material treated, and between 0·01 and 1 per cent with reference to the amount of the said carbon­ aceous material of a non-metallic substance com­ prising free halogen or hydrogen halide, th e halogen portion of said non-metallic substance being selected 1. A petroleum containing means including a from the group consisting of chlorine and bromine. rigid supporting enclosure and a collapsible en­ closure positioned within said supporting enclosure, 2,100,411 . Method of Increasing the Cor­ th e oute r dimensions of th e said collapsible enclosure rosio n Resistance of Aluminium Alloys and being greater than the inner dimensions of the said Product s Resulting Therefrom. Otto Reuleaux, supportin g enclosure. Hanover, Germany, assignor to Vereinigte Leicht- metall-Werke Gesellschaft mit beschrankter Haf- 2,102,817 . Fuselage Construction. Fred­ tung , Hanover, Germany, a corporation of Germany. erick R. Weymouth, Buffalo, N.Y., assignor, by No Drawing. Application October 15, 1935. Serial mesn e assignments, to Curtiss-Wright Corporation, No. 45, 120. In Germany, October 16, 1934. a corporation of New York. Application April 4, 4 claims. [Class 148-32.] 1935. Serial No. 14,550. 5 claims. [Class 244- 1. The process for producing a high strength 119.] on said seat, and means carried by said scat for integral corrosion resistant aluminium article con­ limiting the movements of said gun standard to a 2 . In monocoque fuselage construction, a joint taining an appreciable amount of copper and having predetermine d path with respect to the seat. adapte d for the connection of two unit fuselage a surface hardness greater than and a corrosion panels, one of the said panels comprising a skin resistance substantially equal to that of pure section braced circumferentially and adapted to 2,101,542 . Method of Compressing Wood. aluminium which comprises welding a very thin assume principally shear loads, the other of said laye r of pure aluminium to a core of aluminium- Rober t N. Hartzell, Piqua, Ohio, assignor to Hart- panel s comprising a skin section braced longitudin­ zell Industries, Inc., Piqua, Ohio, a corporation of copper alloy of the age-hardening type to form a ally by continuous stringers and transversely by Delaware. Application August 2, 1935. Serial composite article having (1) a high strength, corrod- formers provided with apertures at one end and No . 34,377. 1 claim. [Class 144-309.] ible core, (2) a low strength, corrosion resistant forming with a similarly provided adjacent edge of coating, and (3) a bond containing copper and Th e method of making a laminated propeller th e said skin section a half of the said joint, the uniting said core and said coating and having a comprising forming strips of wood of tapering thick­ second said panel adapted principally to assume thinness approximating that of a conventional ness, heating and compressing the strips to produce compressive and tensile loads, the first said panel bond ; heat treating said composite article at an graduate d degrees of compression with the greatest provided with a longeron attached to the said skin annealing temperature beyond the usual annealing degree a t the thicker portions of th e strips, th e heat­ section and circumferential bracing, having an time for a period u p to 30 minutes to cause accentu­ ing and compression to which the strips are sub­ attache d bracket fitting and adapted to form there­ ate d diffusion of said copper throughout said coat­ jected being carried out at a temperature of about with a second half of the said joint, apertures in the ing ; stopping said heating just prior to th e occur­ 300 deg. F. , a t a time of about a minute and a half said bracket fitting adapted to align with those of rence of the copper in th e surface skin of said coat­ an d a maximum pressure of abou t 700 lb. pe r sq. in., one of the said formers, apertures in the edges of ing whereby the bond and coating substantially so as to permanently compress the fibres progress- bot h said skin sections and the said longeron, and disappear and an integral article is formed having ively to various degrees a t various points along the fastening means adapted to engage the said aper­ high strength and having copper diffused substanti­ ture s in assembled relationship of the two panels. ally throughout the same except in the surface skin which is practically devoid of copper and which ha s a hardness greater tha n tha t of pure aluminium an d a corrosion resistance practically that of pure aluminium. lengt h of each strip while maintaining the strength of the fibres, and gluing the strips together to form a propeller blade with the denser portions of the * The above abstracts or patents granted in the United States blade being used for the hub portion. are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the 2,101,970 . Valve Seat. William A. Wissler, Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. Flushing, N.Y., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation, a corpora­ by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1938

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