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U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications having a substantially spherical and continuous sheet metal chamber wall and an open rearward discharge nozzle, said chamber comprising a casing enclosing a jacket space about said wall, means to supply a liquid oxidizer under pressure to said jacket space, said wall These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the having a multiplicity of substantially spaced and Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies tangentially directed spray openings, whereby a cool­ ing oxidizer film is supplied to said wall, and addi­ of the full specifications can be obtained, price 25 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, tional spray devices for a liquid fuel, said additional Washington, D.C., U.S.A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, devices being disposed in spaced parallel diametral Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, VV.C.2. zones and extending inside of said liquid film and being provided with less divergent spray openings and directing fuel sprays to an area substantially spaced inward from said chamber wall and cooling 2,688,843. Apparatus for Augmenting Mass and film. Velocity of Exhaust Streams. Paul A. Pitt, San Diego, Calif., assignor to Solar Aircraft Company, San Diego, Calif. Application November 13, 1945. 2,689,454. Rocket Engine. Hans Schneider, Propulsive thrust generating apparatus having Chatenay-Malabry, France, assignor to Societe forward propulsive thrust reacting surfaces compris­ d'Etude de la Propulsion par Reaction, Villejuif, ing: a duct; means for introducing into said duct a France. Application April 18, 1951. Application plurality of fluids which, when mixed, form a combust­ France May 13, 1950. ible mixture; means including a deflector forming a A rocket engine comprising a preliminary ignition mixing zone in which said fluids are formed into said chamber, a combustion chamber, reduced neck pro­ combustible mixture, said deflector extending along viding a connexion between said chambers, a turbine at least a substantial portion of a periphery of said having an inlet communicating with said preliminary mixing zone and forming a wall of a sheltered com­ ignition chamber, nonhypergolic fuel supply means bustion zone, and creating turbulence downstream including a conduit to said combustion chamber, hypergolic fuel supply means including a conduit to with said walls so as to be capable of longitudinal said preliminary ignition chamber for supplying hyper­ motion with respect to said vane, said strip providing golic fuel thereto only during starting, conduit means friction damping when the vane vibrates. 2,689,452. Device for Increasing the Thrust of Turbojet Engines. Donald J. Jordan, Glastonbury, Conn., assignor to United Aircraft Corporation, East Hartford, Conn. Application December 2, 1949. A jet-engine including air inlet means, a compressor, a turbine and a combustion chamber in the airstrcam between said compressor and turbine, an afterburner of said sheltered combustion zone; means forming a main combustion zone downstream of said mixing zone; and means effective to establish and maintain an ignition flame in said sheltered combustion zone which ignites said combustible mixture in said main combustion zone and causes continuous flame propa­ for supplying comburant to said combustion and gation across said combustible mixture in said main preliminary ignition chambers respectively, and pump combustion zone with zone with said mixture travell­ means operatively connected to said turbine for each ing at a velocity higher than the rate of normal flame of said conduits and conduit means respectively, the propagation in the mixture to cause thrust producing gases caused by combustion of hypergolic fuel in the acceleration of said gases reacting against said surfaces. preliminary ignition chamber starting the turbine and the turbine thereafter being driven by gases from the 2,689,099. Triangular Stabilizer for Rotary Wing combustion chamber to which now hypcrgolic fuels Aircraft. Ralph B. Lightfoot, Stratford, Conn., are fed by turbine operated pumps. assignor to United Aircraft Corporation, East Hart­ ford, Conn. Application September 20, 1951. 2,689,614. Jet-Rotated Helicopter or other Rotor. In a rotary wing aircraft having an elongated fusel­ Dudley B. Spalding, Cambridge, England, assignor age and a sustaining rotor at one end of said fuselage, attached to said engine in which additional fuel is to National Research Development Corporation, a stabilizer having an aspect ratio of less than 3 and burned for added thrust, means for supplying said London, England. Application October 4, 1951. of generally triangular plan form and of aerofoil additional fuel, a thrust nozzle on said afterburner, Application Great Britain May 16, 1951. configuration secured to said fuselage adjacent the an oxygen supplying means independent of said fuel supplying means for supplying added combustion supporting oxygen to said afterburner for complete burning of said additional fuel, said added combustion supporting oxygen being in addition to the amount supplied through said air inlet means, said oxygen being a prepared oxidizing agent, said oxygen supply­ ing means including a tank and a piping system con­ nected to said afterburner for said oxidizing agent. 2,689,453. Tangential Sheet Cooling of Internal- Combustion Chambers. Robert H. Goddard, deceased, late of Annapolis, Md., by Esther C. Goddard, execu­ trix, Worcester, Mass., assignor of one-half to The Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation, New York, N.Y. Application December 11, 1952. A combustion chamber for propulsion apparatus A bladed rotor for aircraft propulsion comprising blades, propulsive ducts carried by the blades, each other end of said fuselage, said stabilizer having its duct taking in a stream of air, of which the pressure apex forwardly directed and having its surface general­ is raised by diffusion and the velocity is raised by the ly symmetrical about a fore and aft line. combustion of fuel within the duct, the resultant gases being allowed to expand as a jet providing a propulsive 2,689,107. Vibration Damper for Blades and rotational force to the rotor and, in each duct, a Vanes. Eugene A. Odegaard, East Hartford, Conn., combustion system which comprises rods, which assignor to United Aircraft Corporation, East Hart­ extend in a direction so inclined from the truly radial ford, Conn. Application August 13, 1949. direction relative to the centre of the rotor that the In a vane construction, a hollow metallic vane of outer ends of the rods are positioned upstream of the aerofoil cross section having interior walls defining a inner ends and which are positioned transversely to longitudinally extending opening therein, the chordal the airflow through the duct, and means for supplying dimension of the opening being less than the chordal liquid fuel to the rods; the fuel spreading, under the dimension of the vane, at least one resilient metallic resultant action of the centrifugal force arising from strip mounted within said opening and extending the rotation of the rotor and an opposing component, longitudinally of the vane, said strip being of sinuous due to the inclination of the rods from the truly radial form and having longitudinally spaced lands extending direction, of the force, exerted by the airflow in the in a chordal direction, said lands engaging opposite duct, over the surface of the rods as a film which is walls of said opening and being free of connexion stably combustible in the airflow. 432 Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 26 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1954

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032508
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

having a substantially spherical and continuous sheet metal chamber wall and an open rearward discharge nozzle, said chamber comprising a casing enclosing a jacket space about said wall, means to supply a liquid oxidizer under pressure to said jacket space, said wall These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the having a multiplicity of substantially spaced and Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies tangentially directed spray openings, whereby a cool­ ing oxidizer film is supplied to said wall, and addi­ of the full specifications can be obtained, price 25 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, tional spray devices for a liquid fuel, said additional Washington, D.C., U.S.A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, devices being disposed in spaced parallel diametral Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, VV.C.2. zones and extending inside of said liquid film and being provided with less divergent spray openings and directing fuel sprays to an area substantially spaced inward from said chamber wall and cooling 2,688,843. Apparatus for Augmenting Mass and film. Velocity of Exhaust Streams. Paul A. Pitt, San Diego, Calif., assignor to Solar Aircraft Company, San Diego, Calif. Application November 13, 1945. 2,689,454. Rocket Engine. Hans Schneider, Propulsive thrust generating apparatus having Chatenay-Malabry, France, assignor to Societe forward propulsive thrust reacting surfaces compris­ d'Etude de la Propulsion par Reaction, Villejuif, ing: a duct; means for introducing into said duct a France. Application April 18, 1951. Application plurality of fluids which, when mixed, form a combust­ France May 13, 1950. ible mixture; means including a deflector forming a A rocket engine comprising a preliminary ignition mixing zone in which said fluids are formed into said chamber, a combustion chamber, reduced neck pro­ combustible mixture, said deflector extending along viding a connexion between said chambers, a turbine at least a substantial portion of a periphery of said having an inlet communicating with said preliminary mixing zone and forming a wall of a sheltered com­ ignition chamber, nonhypergolic fuel supply means bustion zone, and creating turbulence downstream including a conduit to said combustion chamber, hypergolic fuel supply means including a conduit to with said walls so as to be capable of longitudinal said preliminary ignition chamber for supplying hyper­ motion with respect to said vane, said strip providing golic fuel thereto only during starting, conduit means friction damping when the vane vibrates. 2,689,452. Device for Increasing the Thrust of Turbojet Engines. Donald J. Jordan, Glastonbury, Conn., assignor to United Aircraft Corporation, East Hartford, Conn. Application December 2, 1949. A jet-engine including air inlet means, a compressor, a turbine and a combustion chamber in the airstrcam between said compressor and turbine, an afterburner of said sheltered combustion zone; means forming a main combustion zone downstream of said mixing zone; and means effective to establish and maintain an ignition flame in said sheltered combustion zone which ignites said combustible mixture in said main combustion zone and causes continuous flame propa­ for supplying comburant to said combustion and gation across said combustible mixture in said main preliminary ignition chambers respectively, and pump combustion zone with zone with said mixture travell­ means operatively connected to said turbine for each ing at a velocity higher than the rate of normal flame of said conduits and conduit means respectively, the propagation in the mixture to cause thrust producing gases caused by combustion of hypergolic fuel in the acceleration of said gases reacting against said surfaces. preliminary ignition chamber starting the turbine and the turbine thereafter being driven by gases from the 2,689,099. Triangular Stabilizer for Rotary Wing combustion chamber to which now hypcrgolic fuels Aircraft. Ralph B. Lightfoot, Stratford, Conn., are fed by turbine operated pumps. assignor to United Aircraft Corporation, East Hart­ ford, Conn. Application September 20, 1951. 2,689,614. Jet-Rotated Helicopter or other Rotor. In a rotary wing aircraft having an elongated fusel­ Dudley B. Spalding, Cambridge, England, assignor age and a sustaining rotor at one end of said fuselage, attached to said engine in which additional fuel is to National Research Development Corporation, a stabilizer having an aspect ratio of less than 3 and burned for added thrust, means for supplying said London, England. Application October 4, 1951. of generally triangular plan form and of aerofoil additional fuel, a thrust nozzle on said afterburner, Application Great Britain May 16, 1951. configuration secured to said fuselage adjacent the an oxygen supplying means independent of said fuel supplying means for supplying added combustion supporting oxygen to said afterburner for complete burning of said additional fuel, said added combustion supporting oxygen being in addition to the amount supplied through said air inlet means, said oxygen being a prepared oxidizing agent, said oxygen supply­ ing means including a tank and a piping system con­ nected to said afterburner for said oxidizing agent. 2,689,453. Tangential Sheet Cooling of Internal- Combustion Chambers. Robert H. Goddard, deceased, late of Annapolis, Md., by Esther C. Goddard, execu­ trix, Worcester, Mass., assignor of one-half to The Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation, New York, N.Y. Application December 11, 1952. A combustion chamber for propulsion apparatus A bladed rotor for aircraft propulsion comprising blades, propulsive ducts carried by the blades, each other end of said fuselage, said stabilizer having its duct taking in a stream of air, of which the pressure apex forwardly directed and having its surface general­ is raised by diffusion and the velocity is raised by the ly symmetrical about a fore and aft line. combustion of fuel within the duct, the resultant gases being allowed to expand as a jet providing a propulsive 2,689,107. Vibration Damper for Blades and rotational force to the rotor and, in each duct, a Vanes. Eugene A. Odegaard, East Hartford, Conn., combustion system which comprises rods, which assignor to United Aircraft Corporation, East Hart­ extend in a direction so inclined from the truly radial ford, Conn. Application August 13, 1949. direction relative to the centre of the rotor that the In a vane construction, a hollow metallic vane of outer ends of the rods are positioned upstream of the aerofoil cross section having interior walls defining a inner ends and which are positioned transversely to longitudinally extending opening therein, the chordal the airflow through the duct, and means for supplying dimension of the opening being less than the chordal liquid fuel to the rods; the fuel spreading, under the dimension of the vane, at least one resilient metallic resultant action of the centrifugal force arising from strip mounted within said opening and extending the rotation of the rotor and an opposing component, longitudinally of the vane, said strip being of sinuous due to the inclination of the rods from the truly radial form and having longitudinally spaced lands extending direction, of the force, exerted by the airflow in the in a chordal direction, said lands engaging opposite duct, over the surface of the rods as a film which is walls of said opening and being free of connexion stably combustible in the airflow. 432 Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1954

There are no references for this article.