U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 25 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 2,671,622. Emergency Pilot Ejector. Raymond Saulnier, Paris, France. Application December 5, 1951. Application France December 16, 1950. A device for evacuating an occupant seated in a cockpit of an aircraft comprising, in combination, a backed scat downwardly tiltable around a transverse the parachute from the cavity to a region above and axis located in front of said scat, releasable means to clear of the airflow through the propeller when the hold said seat in normal sitting position, a normally aeroplane is in said vertical attitude, and means for covered opening in the bottom of said cockpit be­ spreading the margin of the canopy when the para­ neath said scat, means to uncover said opening, and the longitudinal blade axis, the rotor blades chute is ejected comprising a resilient element con­ means to release said seat to allow the same to tilt being free for opposite flapping on said pivot axes, fined in curved position when the parachute is in the but normally damped as to simultaneous upward or cavity and lending to straighten by its resilience when downward change of coning angle by means of a con­ freed from the cavity. ing damper assembly, said assembly comprising movably-interengaged but relatively-damped parts 2,673,445. Turbojet and Rocket Motor Combina­ which respectively have coning-thrust linkages con­ tion with Hot Gas Ignition System for Nonself-Reac- nected only between blades of the rotor, so that said tion Rocket Fuels. Bruno W. Bruckmann, Greene parts may move as a unit, free of damping-thrust County, Ohio, assignor to United States of America reaction relative to the rotor axis structure. as represented by the Secretary of the Air Force. Application June 21, 1949. 2,672,307. Airplane Yaw Damper. William II. Cook, Jr., Bellevue and Calvin E. Pfafman and George S. Schairer, Seattle, Wash., assignors to Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, Wash. Applica­ into said opening and abutment means to stop said tion October 9, 1950. seat in said opening when its back has reached a Control mechanism for an aeroplane comprising predetermined position inclined downwards and rear­ a swingable control surface, hydraulic power means wards with respect to said bottom, whereby said oc­ including a control valve therefor, aeroplane struc­ cupant is caused to leave said scat by a movement of translation in a direction depending upon said back In a turbojet aircraft engine including in consecutive predetermined position. series an air compressor, a plurality of combustion chambers, a gas turbine and an exhaust section provid­ 2,672,011. Centrifugal Fuel Supply for Continuous ing an annular exhaust passage coaxially located with Flow Internal-Combustion Engines. Helmut P. G. A. R. respect to said engine, a rocket motor including an von Zborowski, Paris, France. Application August 18, open-ended housing forming a reaction chamber, 1951. Application France November 13, 1950. means mounting said housing centrally of said ex­ haust section and within the circular space inside of A continuous flow internal combustion engine of said annular exhaust passage, means for conducting the class described, comprising: an enclosure defining limited volumes of hot exhaust gases from at least a combustion space and extending to form a passage for the flow of a continuous stream of air towards said one of said combustion chambers to said reaction combustion space; a freely rotatable airscrew having chamber, means for feeding rocket reactants to said a hollow hub, said airscrew being disposed in said reaction chamber to produce a flow of gaseous reac­ passage to be driven by said stream, said airscrew tion products for discharge from the open end of said having at least one blade with a radially outwardly housing in the same direction as the exhaust gases extending fuel passage formed therein, said fuel pas­ flowing through and out of said annular exhaust passage from the engine, means for starting the sage communicating directly with the interior of said flow of hot gases to said reaction chamber before the hub, said blade having at least one fuel delivery pas­ ture supporting said control surface, means support­ flow of rocket reactants thereto is started, and means sage formed therein communicating between said ing said hydraulic powers means from said aeroplane responsive to initiation of the rocket reaction involv­ structure, means operatively connecting said hydraulic ing said reactants for stopping further flow of hot power means to said control surface to effect swinging gases into said reaction chamber. thereof, pilot-operated control means, interconnect­ 2,637,696. Helicopter Having a Jet-Driven Rotor ing means connected to said pilot-operated control System. Cyril George Pullin, Tadburn, Ampfield means and including motion transmitting means and Jacob Samuel Shapiro, London, England, as­ connected to said hydraulic power means control signors, by mesne assignments, to Autogiro Company valve and operable to effect control surface moving of America, Philadelphia, Pa. Application May 20, operation of said hydraulic power means by move­ 1947. Application Great Britain May 24, 1946. ment of said valve effected by said pilot-operated control means, and further including electric motor means operable to effect control surface moving operation of said hydraulic power means by move­ ment of said valve while said pilot-operated control means remains stationary, and sensitive rate-of- radially extending passage and the exterior of said angular-displacement sensing means operable to blade; a fuel reservoir; and a continuous suction pipe sense the rate of angular displacement of said aero­ extending between said hollow hub and said reservoir, plane structure and further operable to energize said whereby said fuel is caused to flow from said tank to electric motor means for moving said hydraulic said hub by centrifugal action on fuel disposed in power means control valve to effect movement of said radially extending fuel passage. said control surface by operation of said hydraulic power means while said pilot-operated control means An aircraft having a body and a bladed sustaining 2,672,202. Aircraft Sustaining Rotor Blade Damp­ remains stationary. rotor, including a stationary pressure-retentive tank ing System. Cyril George Pullin, Tadburn, Ampfield adapted to store fuel in the state of liquid in equi­ and Jacob Samuel Shapiro, London, England, assig­ 2,673,051. Parachute Means for Landing Aircraft. librium with its own vapour, a jet device spaced at nors, by mesne assignments, to Autogiro Company Eugene C. Frost, Burbank, Calif., assignor to Lock­ substantially the farthermost point from the rotor of America, Philadelphia, Pa. Application July 3, heed Aircraft Corporation, Burbank, Calif. Applica­ centre and adapted to drive the rotor, said jet com­ 1947, in Great Britain November 15, 1945. tion May 22, 1951. prising an acro-thermo-dynamic propulsive duct con­ structed to take in at the zone of combustion at least In an aircraft, a sustaining rotor comprising a In an aeroplane capable of horizontal flight and the major proportion of the air required for combus­ rotational axis structure adapted to be disposed with of descending and ascending in a vertical tail-down tion and adapted to use the fuel supplied to it in the its axis is a substantially vertical position for flight attitude and having a propeller on its forward end the vapour state, and a radially-extending fuel line con­ of the aircraft on said rotor, a plurality of sustaining combination of a stationary nose projecting forwardly nected to deliver vaporized fuel from said tank to said blades radiating from said axis, a pivotal connexion beyond the propeller, the nose having a cavity, a duct and constructed and disposed within a blade of between each blade and said axis structure having a parachute stowed in the cavity including a canopy and the rotor as to act as a centrifugal vapour compressor flapping pivot axis disposed substantially perpendi­ shrouds, line means stowed in the cavity securing the when the sustaining rotor is rotating. cularly to an upright plane containing the rotor axis shrouds to the aeroplane, means for forcibly ejecting Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 26 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1954

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032452
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 25 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 2,671,622. Emergency Pilot Ejector. Raymond Saulnier, Paris, France. Application December 5, 1951. Application France December 16, 1950. A device for evacuating an occupant seated in a cockpit of an aircraft comprising, in combination, a backed scat downwardly tiltable around a transverse the parachute from the cavity to a region above and axis located in front of said scat, releasable means to clear of the airflow through the propeller when the hold said seat in normal sitting position, a normally aeroplane is in said vertical attitude, and means for covered opening in the bottom of said cockpit be­ spreading the margin of the canopy when the para­ neath said scat, means to uncover said opening, and the longitudinal blade axis, the rotor blades chute is ejected comprising a resilient element con­ means to release said seat to allow the same to tilt being free for opposite flapping on said pivot axes, fined in curved position when the parachute is in the but normally damped as to simultaneous upward or cavity and lending to straighten by its resilience when downward change of coning angle by means of a con­ freed from the cavity. ing damper assembly, said assembly comprising movably-interengaged but relatively-damped parts 2,673,445. Turbojet and Rocket Motor Combina­ which respectively have coning-thrust linkages con­ tion with Hot Gas Ignition System for Nonself-Reac- nected only between blades of the rotor, so that said tion Rocket Fuels. Bruno W. Bruckmann, Greene parts may move as a unit, free of damping-thrust County, Ohio, assignor to United States of America reaction relative to the rotor axis structure. as represented by the Secretary of the Air Force. Application June 21, 1949. 2,672,307. Airplane Yaw Damper. William II. Cook, Jr., Bellevue and Calvin E. Pfafman and George S. Schairer, Seattle, Wash., assignors to Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, Wash. Applica­ into said opening and abutment means to stop said tion October 9, 1950. seat in said opening when its back has reached a Control mechanism for an aeroplane comprising predetermined position inclined downwards and rear­ a swingable control surface, hydraulic power means wards with respect to said bottom, whereby said oc­ including a control valve therefor, aeroplane struc­ cupant is caused to leave said scat by a movement of translation in a direction depending upon said back In a turbojet aircraft engine including in consecutive predetermined position. series an air compressor, a plurality of combustion chambers, a gas turbine and an exhaust section provid­ 2,672,011. Centrifugal Fuel Supply for Continuous ing an annular exhaust passage coaxially located with Flow Internal-Combustion Engines. Helmut P. G. A. R. respect to said engine, a rocket motor including an von Zborowski, Paris, France. Application August 18, open-ended housing forming a reaction chamber, 1951. Application France November 13, 1950. means mounting said housing centrally of said ex­ haust section and within the circular space inside of A continuous flow internal combustion engine of said annular exhaust passage, means for conducting the class described, comprising: an enclosure defining limited volumes of hot exhaust gases from at least a combustion space and extending to form a passage for the flow of a continuous stream of air towards said one of said combustion chambers to said reaction combustion space; a freely rotatable airscrew having chamber, means for feeding rocket reactants to said a hollow hub, said airscrew being disposed in said reaction chamber to produce a flow of gaseous reac­ passage to be driven by said stream, said airscrew tion products for discharge from the open end of said having at least one blade with a radially outwardly housing in the same direction as the exhaust gases extending fuel passage formed therein, said fuel pas­ flowing through and out of said annular exhaust passage from the engine, means for starting the sage communicating directly with the interior of said flow of hot gases to said reaction chamber before the hub, said blade having at least one fuel delivery pas­ ture supporting said control surface, means support­ flow of rocket reactants thereto is started, and means sage formed therein communicating between said ing said hydraulic powers means from said aeroplane responsive to initiation of the rocket reaction involv­ structure, means operatively connecting said hydraulic ing said reactants for stopping further flow of hot power means to said control surface to effect swinging gases into said reaction chamber. thereof, pilot-operated control means, interconnect­ 2,637,696. Helicopter Having a Jet-Driven Rotor ing means connected to said pilot-operated control System. Cyril George Pullin, Tadburn, Ampfield means and including motion transmitting means and Jacob Samuel Shapiro, London, England, as­ connected to said hydraulic power means control signors, by mesne assignments, to Autogiro Company valve and operable to effect control surface moving of America, Philadelphia, Pa. Application May 20, operation of said hydraulic power means by move­ 1947. Application Great Britain May 24, 1946. ment of said valve effected by said pilot-operated control means, and further including electric motor means operable to effect control surface moving operation of said hydraulic power means by move­ ment of said valve while said pilot-operated control means remains stationary, and sensitive rate-of- radially extending passage and the exterior of said angular-displacement sensing means operable to blade; a fuel reservoir; and a continuous suction pipe sense the rate of angular displacement of said aero­ extending between said hollow hub and said reservoir, plane structure and further operable to energize said whereby said fuel is caused to flow from said tank to electric motor means for moving said hydraulic said hub by centrifugal action on fuel disposed in power means control valve to effect movement of said radially extending fuel passage. said control surface by operation of said hydraulic power means while said pilot-operated control means An aircraft having a body and a bladed sustaining 2,672,202. Aircraft Sustaining Rotor Blade Damp­ remains stationary. rotor, including a stationary pressure-retentive tank ing System. Cyril George Pullin, Tadburn, Ampfield adapted to store fuel in the state of liquid in equi­ and Jacob Samuel Shapiro, London, England, assig­ 2,673,051. Parachute Means for Landing Aircraft. librium with its own vapour, a jet device spaced at nors, by mesne assignments, to Autogiro Company Eugene C. Frost, Burbank, Calif., assignor to Lock­ substantially the farthermost point from the rotor of America, Philadelphia, Pa. Application July 3, heed Aircraft Corporation, Burbank, Calif. Applica­ centre and adapted to drive the rotor, said jet com­ 1947, in Great Britain November 15, 1945. tion May 22, 1951. prising an acro-thermo-dynamic propulsive duct con­ structed to take in at the zone of combustion at least In an aircraft, a sustaining rotor comprising a In an aeroplane capable of horizontal flight and the major proportion of the air required for combus­ rotational axis structure adapted to be disposed with of descending and ascending in a vertical tail-down tion and adapted to use the fuel supplied to it in the its axis is a substantially vertical position for flight attitude and having a propeller on its forward end the vapour state, and a radially-extending fuel line con­ of the aircraft on said rotor, a plurality of sustaining combination of a stationary nose projecting forwardly nected to deliver vaporized fuel from said tank to said blades radiating from said axis, a pivotal connexion beyond the propeller, the nose having a cavity, a duct and constructed and disposed within a blade of between each blade and said axis structure having a parachute stowed in the cavity including a canopy and the rotor as to act as a centrifugal vapour compressor flapping pivot axis disposed substantially perpendi­ shrouds, line means stowed in the cavity securing the when the sustaining rotor is rotating. cularly to an upright plane containing the rotor axis shrouds to the aeroplane, means for forcibly ejecting Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1954

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