Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications 432 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING November, 1939 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,167,644 . Amphibian Hull Resilient Step. 2,165,198 . Automatic Control Means for Walte r S. Dichl, United States Navy. Application De-icin g Mechanisms for Aircraft. Howard December 4, 1937. Serial No. 178,094. 3 Claims. E . Baer, Garfield, N . J. , assignor t o Eclipse Aviation [Class 114-66.5.] (Granted under the ac t of March 3, Corporation, East Orange, N.J., a corporation of 1883, a s amended April 30, 1928 ; 370 O. G. 757.) New Jersey. Application Dec. 14, 1935. Serial No . 54,487. Renewed April 22, 1938. 6 claims. [Class 244-134.] 1. In combination, an aircraft, de-icing mechanis m including inflatable members on the surface of said aircraft for preventing accumulation of ice on said surface, means for periodically in­ flating said inflatable members, and means on said surface and responsive to ice formation for auto­ matically controlling inflating means. I. In an amphibian aircraft a V-shaped hull to the rear than that of the inboard section, a having a main step dividing its keel into a forward thickness substantially equal to tha t of th e inboard keel and an after keel, a resilient member located section, a trailing edge comprising a substantial a t the keel line of said step, said resilient member prolongation of the trailing edge of the inboard being in the form of a tetrahedron defined by a section, and an effective angle of incidence lower plan e extending parallel to the keel line of th e after tha n that of the inboard section. keel and equidistant from the V sides of the after keel. 2,165,954 . Device for Time-Controllin g the 2,167,686 . Airplane Rib. Karl Schmidt, Openin g of Parachutes. William Bird, Buffalo, United States Navy. Application March 9, 1938. an d Donald R. Clark, Amherst, N.Y. Application Serial No. 194, 886. 6 Claims. [Class 244-132.] March 31, 1937. Serial No. 134,030. 12 Claims. (Granted under the Act of March 3, 1883, as [Class 244-150.] amended April 30, 1928 ; 370 O. G. 757.) 5. A time-control device for causing parachutes 1. An aeroplane wing rib construction comprising t o open, comprising a casing having a clock-spring a capstrip having an inwardly extending web por­ therein, a shaft extending therethrough for winding tion and an outer channel portion of substantially V-shape in cross-section, and a load-strip of cor­ 2,165,443 . Aircraft Power Plant. Donovan R. Berlin, Eggertsville, N. Y., assignor to Curtiss- "Wright Corporation, a corporation of Delaware. Application April 16, 1937. Serial No. 137,194. 4 claims. [Class 60-13.] 1. In aircraft, in combination, a body having up and straining said clock-spring, retention means an internal combustion power plant within its to hold said shaft under strain of said clock-spring, forward end, a radiator within the body rearward said retention means including a ratchet wheel and of the power plant, a turbo supercharger within a n eccentrically-mounted detent lever engaging responding cross-sectional shape attached to said th e body having its turbine discharging laterally said ratchet wheel, timing mechanism carried by capstri p for flexing a fabric wing covering into said from the body and having the discharge end of said casing and retained against actuation, a cord channel portion and securing it under tension its supercharger feeding said radiator, ducts leading adapte d for connection with a parachute pack, said therein, the channel portion of said load-strip throug h the body surface for establishing cooling cord having take-up connection with said shaft and havin g a rib extending longitudinally therealong. airflow to said radiator, and ducts directing the being held in slack condition when said shaft is cooling airflow leaving said radiator over and 2,167,694 . Ignition Apparatus for Internal maintaine d under strain of said clock-spring, and around the surface of said turbine, and through the Combustio n Engines. Walter J. Spongier, mean s interposed between said time-control device bod y surface. Sidney, N. Y., assignor to Bendix Aviation Cor­ an d said detent-lever to be actuated by said time- poration , South Bend, Ind., a corporation of control device and cause release of said retention Delaware. Application February 27, 1936. Serial mean s so as to permit the automatic winding up No . 66,077. 5 Claims. (Class 200-31.] of said cord and cause said parachute pack to bo 2. In an ignition system for internal combustion opened. 2,166,564 . Airplane Having Folding Wings. Joh n L. Atwood and Vladimir H. Pavlecka, Santa Monica, Calif., assignors to Douglas Aircraft Company , Inc., Santa Monica, Calif., a corporation of Delaware. Application March 4, 1936. Serial No . 66,999. 34 claims. [Class 244-49.] 2,165,482 . Aircraft Wing Arrangement. 1. In a winged aerial vehicle, a hinged wing Pau l E. Hovgard, Kenmore, N. Y., assignor to membe r and operating means for swinging said Curtiss-Wright Corporation, a corporation of wing member relative to a wing supporting member, Delaware. Application March 26, 1938. Serial betwee n extended and retracted positions, com­ No . 198,217. 3 claims. [Class 244-13.] prising : a hinge connecting said wing member to said supporting member, said hinge being disposed 1. In aircraft comprising a long nose fuselage, nea r one face of said wing member ; a stationary a n inboard wing section of less thickness than pivot member carried by said supporting member th e fuselage extending laterally therefrom, said inboard section being characterized by a profile in a position adjacent said hinge ; a movable pivot of long chord, low angl e of incidence, and a leading member connected to said wing member in eccentric edge rearwardly spaced from the fuselage nose ; a relation to said hinge ; a fulcrum member having engines a timer and distributor unit including a protuberanc e at the outer end of said inboard its outer end connected to said movable pivot driv e shaft, a driven shaft, a breaker cam and a section extending forwardly of the section leading membe r ; a link connecting an intermediate part distributo r arm mounted on the driven shaft, and edge ; and an outboard wing section extending of said fulcrum member to said stationary pivot automaticall y variable means for coupling said laterally beyond said protuberance, and having the member ; and means for applying a force to said driving and driven shafts including a pivoted following characteristics: A leading edge farther fulcrum member to swing it on said link and swing member operable by centrifugal force to advance said link on said stationary pivot member. th e driven shaft with respect to the drive shaft, * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States an d a U-shaped spring opposing such action having are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of one arm anchored to the pivot of the centrifugal the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the membe r and the other arm anchored to said mem­ Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. ber, said spring being longitudinally adjustable Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied by drawings if none is reproduced. to vary its stiffness. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 11 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1939

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/u-s-patent-specifications-PyKaUdSZyG
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030574
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

432 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING November, 1939 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,167,644 . Amphibian Hull Resilient Step. 2,165,198 . Automatic Control Means for Walte r S. Dichl, United States Navy. Application De-icin g Mechanisms for Aircraft. Howard December 4, 1937. Serial No. 178,094. 3 Claims. E . Baer, Garfield, N . J. , assignor t o Eclipse Aviation [Class 114-66.5.] (Granted under the ac t of March 3, Corporation, East Orange, N.J., a corporation of 1883, a s amended April 30, 1928 ; 370 O. G. 757.) New Jersey. Application Dec. 14, 1935. Serial No . 54,487. Renewed April 22, 1938. 6 claims. [Class 244-134.] 1. In combination, an aircraft, de-icing mechanis m including inflatable members on the surface of said aircraft for preventing accumulation of ice on said surface, means for periodically in­ flating said inflatable members, and means on said surface and responsive to ice formation for auto­ matically controlling inflating means. I. In an amphibian aircraft a V-shaped hull to the rear than that of the inboard section, a having a main step dividing its keel into a forward thickness substantially equal to tha t of th e inboard keel and an after keel, a resilient member located section, a trailing edge comprising a substantial a t the keel line of said step, said resilient member prolongation of the trailing edge of the inboard being in the form of a tetrahedron defined by a section, and an effective angle of incidence lower plan e extending parallel to the keel line of th e after tha n that of the inboard section. keel and equidistant from the V sides of the after keel. 2,165,954 . Device for Time-Controllin g the 2,167,686 . Airplane Rib. Karl Schmidt, Openin g of Parachutes. William Bird, Buffalo, United States Navy. Application March 9, 1938. an d Donald R. Clark, Amherst, N.Y. Application Serial No. 194, 886. 6 Claims. [Class 244-132.] March 31, 1937. Serial No. 134,030. 12 Claims. (Granted under the Act of March 3, 1883, as [Class 244-150.] amended April 30, 1928 ; 370 O. G. 757.) 5. A time-control device for causing parachutes 1. An aeroplane wing rib construction comprising t o open, comprising a casing having a clock-spring a capstrip having an inwardly extending web por­ therein, a shaft extending therethrough for winding tion and an outer channel portion of substantially V-shape in cross-section, and a load-strip of cor­ 2,165,443 . Aircraft Power Plant. Donovan R. Berlin, Eggertsville, N. Y., assignor to Curtiss- "Wright Corporation, a corporation of Delaware. Application April 16, 1937. Serial No. 137,194. 4 claims. [Class 60-13.] 1. In aircraft, in combination, a body having up and straining said clock-spring, retention means an internal combustion power plant within its to hold said shaft under strain of said clock-spring, forward end, a radiator within the body rearward said retention means including a ratchet wheel and of the power plant, a turbo supercharger within a n eccentrically-mounted detent lever engaging responding cross-sectional shape attached to said th e body having its turbine discharging laterally said ratchet wheel, timing mechanism carried by capstri p for flexing a fabric wing covering into said from the body and having the discharge end of said casing and retained against actuation, a cord channel portion and securing it under tension its supercharger feeding said radiator, ducts leading adapte d for connection with a parachute pack, said therein, the channel portion of said load-strip throug h the body surface for establishing cooling cord having take-up connection with said shaft and havin g a rib extending longitudinally therealong. airflow to said radiator, and ducts directing the being held in slack condition when said shaft is cooling airflow leaving said radiator over and 2,167,694 . Ignition Apparatus for Internal maintaine d under strain of said clock-spring, and around the surface of said turbine, and through the Combustio n Engines. Walter J. Spongier, mean s interposed between said time-control device bod y surface. Sidney, N. Y., assignor to Bendix Aviation Cor­ an d said detent-lever to be actuated by said time- poration , South Bend, Ind., a corporation of control device and cause release of said retention Delaware. Application February 27, 1936. Serial mean s so as to permit the automatic winding up No . 66,077. 5 Claims. (Class 200-31.] of said cord and cause said parachute pack to bo 2. In an ignition system for internal combustion opened. 2,166,564 . Airplane Having Folding Wings. Joh n L. Atwood and Vladimir H. Pavlecka, Santa Monica, Calif., assignors to Douglas Aircraft Company , Inc., Santa Monica, Calif., a corporation of Delaware. Application March 4, 1936. Serial No . 66,999. 34 claims. [Class 244-49.] 2,165,482 . Aircraft Wing Arrangement. 1. In a winged aerial vehicle, a hinged wing Pau l E. Hovgard, Kenmore, N. Y., assignor to membe r and operating means for swinging said Curtiss-Wright Corporation, a corporation of wing member relative to a wing supporting member, Delaware. Application March 26, 1938. Serial betwee n extended and retracted positions, com­ No . 198,217. 3 claims. [Class 244-13.] prising : a hinge connecting said wing member to said supporting member, said hinge being disposed 1. In aircraft comprising a long nose fuselage, nea r one face of said wing member ; a stationary a n inboard wing section of less thickness than pivot member carried by said supporting member th e fuselage extending laterally therefrom, said inboard section being characterized by a profile in a position adjacent said hinge ; a movable pivot of long chord, low angl e of incidence, and a leading member connected to said wing member in eccentric edge rearwardly spaced from the fuselage nose ; a relation to said hinge ; a fulcrum member having engines a timer and distributor unit including a protuberanc e at the outer end of said inboard its outer end connected to said movable pivot driv e shaft, a driven shaft, a breaker cam and a section extending forwardly of the section leading membe r ; a link connecting an intermediate part distributo r arm mounted on the driven shaft, and edge ; and an outboard wing section extending of said fulcrum member to said stationary pivot automaticall y variable means for coupling said laterally beyond said protuberance, and having the member ; and means for applying a force to said driving and driven shafts including a pivoted following characteristics: A leading edge farther fulcrum member to swing it on said link and swing member operable by centrifugal force to advance said link on said stationary pivot member. th e driven shaft with respect to the drive shaft, * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States an d a U-shaped spring opposing such action having are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of one arm anchored to the pivot of the centrifugal the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the membe r and the other arm anchored to said mem­ Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. ber, said spring being longitudinally adjustable Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied by drawings if none is reproduced. to vary its stiffness.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1939

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month