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U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications vane portion having a recess therein communicating with the interior of said cooling bulb, and a fluid U.S. Patent Specifications medium having decreased density with increased temperature in the normal range of operating tem­ peratures contained within the recess whereby rotation These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 25 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 2,699,219. Control of Gas-Turbine Engine Driven Propeller for Aircraft. Brian H. Slatter, Thomas G. Daish and Edwin G. Caswell, Coventry, England, assignors to Armstrong Siddeley Motors Limited, Coventry, England. Application July 8, 1951. Applica­ tion Great Britain, July 7, 1950. A throttle-controlled, propeller-driving, gas turbine engine, for an aircraft, including a pitch-change of the turbine wheel together with the heating of the mechanism connected to vary the pitch of a variable vane portion of the blade by the working fluid sets pitch propeller, pitch coarsening and fining passages up fluid flow in said recess causing a transfer of heat connected with said mechanism, a valve through which from the vane portion to said cooling bulb and a operating fluid under pressure can be selectively sup­ transfer of heat from the cooling bulb to a cooling plied to said passages, said valve connected to be fluid in said passage of the turbine wheel. movable by a governor mechanism for selecting the passage to be supplied, and additional means which with the inner ends of said screwjack means to cause is connected to be actuated by the throttle and which said wings to be actuated about their pivotal points, 2,700,424. Governor System for Rotorcraft. Harris selectively supplies fluid under pressure directly to and means for controlling the longitudinal movement S. Campbell, Bryn Athyn, Pa., assignor to The Fire­ said passages in a position intermediate said mechan­ of said centre section relative to said fuselage. stone Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. ism and said valve in such a manner that the propeller Application July 28, 1948. will very quickly absorb the change in the power 2,699,906. Air Inlet for Aeroplane Gaseous Com­ developed by the engine resulting from movement of A helicopter rotor control mechanism comprising a bustion Turbine Engines. William M. Lee, Chicago, the throttle while keeping the engine speed at a con­ rotor having pitch change mechanism associated Ill. and Julius Jonas, Los Angeles, Calif., assignors to stant predetermined value, at which latter it is always Northrop Aircraft, Inc., Hawthorne, Calif. Applica­ tion October 25, 1949. In an aeroplane driven by a gaseous combustion engine of the type having a compressor driven by a power turbine, a forwardly opening main air inlet on said aeroplane, a main air duct connecting said main air inlet with the inlet of said compressor, said main air duct having an inner wall adjacent an outer surface of said aeroplane at said compressor inlet, an auxiliary air duct between the inner wall of said main air duct and said outer surface of said aeroplane, said auxiliary air duct opening into said main air duct close to said compressor inlet, the length of said auxiliary air duct being substantially less than the length of said main air duct, the external opening of said auxiliary air duct being larger than the internal opening thereof to provide a bell-mouth type of entry, and a movable closure in said auxiliary air duct. maintained by said governor mechanism for any set­ ting of the throttle within the normal operating power range of the engine, said additional means including for the purpose a metering device having a cylinder therewith, a rotor drive including an input shaft having with a sliding and rolling piston therein, a valve with overrunning clutch means and a speed reduction unit two relatively rotatable parts for selectively controlling interposed therein, a hydraulic pump and tachometer the connexion of a source of fluid pressure cither to generator apparatus, said apparatus geared to and one operative end of said cylinder or to said pitch driven from said input shaft intermediate said over­ fining passage, a connexion between the other opera­ running clutch means and rotor, said apparatus being tive end of said cylinder and said pitch coarsening operatively associated with said rotor pitch change passage, a mechanical connexion between one of said mechanism. valve parts and said piston whereby said valve part is rotated by movement of said piston, and a mechanical connexion between the other of said valve parts and 2,700,515. Aeroplane Ram-Jet Propulsion System. the throttle whereby movement of the latter will Otto Reder, Madrid, Spain. Application March 17, rotate the said other of said valve parts, such that 1952. Application Spain July 31, 1951. when the throttle-actuated valve part is moved from the neutral position said piston will be operated by A ram-jet construction for an aeroplane comprising the pressure difference applied to it to effect a follow a fixed aerofoil element, a combustion chamber, 2,699,917. Turbine Wheel and Blade Construction. up movement of the piston-connected valve part to means for supplying fuel to said chamber located on Archie T. Colwell, Cleveland, Ohio, assignor to return the valve to the neutral position. said fixed aerofoil element, said combustion chamber Thompson Products, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio. Applica­ comprising a pair of movable walls, extensible means tion August 24, 1946. connecting said walls to said fixed element, said walls 2,699,300. Aircraft with Adjustable Swept-Back In a turbine rotor and blade assembly including a Wings. John C. Trotter, Williamsville and Robert H. rotatable turbine wheel having a periphery for anchor­ Dufort, Kenmore, N.Y., assignors to Bell Aircraft ing the roots of blades and a passage radially inward Corporation, Wheatfield, N.Y. Application April 20, from said periphery for flow of cooling fluid through it, the improvement of a blade having a root portion In an aeroplane, a fuselage, a centre wing section anchored in said periphery of the turbine wheel, a mounted upon said fuselage to permit longitudinal vane portion extending radially outward from the movement thereof relative to the fuselage, wings periphery of said turbine wheel and a cooling bulb having their root ends pivotally attached to said portion extending radially inward from said root centre section at points located between the leading portion across said passage of the turbine wheel, said and trailing edges of said wings, screwjack means vane portion adapted to be exposed to high tempera­ being movable by the internal pressure in said com­ having their outer ends connected to said wings at ture working fluid for producing operating forces to bustion chamber to a position spaced on each side of points opposite each other, curved wing tracks carried rotate said wheel, said cooling bulb being exposed said fixed element to provide an inlet and outlet for by said wings and arranged concentrically with the to cooling fluid in said passage of the turbine wheel, said combustion chamber when said ram-jet is operat­ pivotal points thereof, bearings carried by said centre said vane portion being constructed of high tempera­ ing and movable to form a continuation of the aero­ section and engaging said wing tracks, actuating means ture resisting material, said bulb portion being con­ foil construction of said fixed element when said ram­ carried by said centre section and having connexion jet is inoperative. structed of high thermal conductivity material, said Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 27 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032571
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

vane portion having a recess therein communicating with the interior of said cooling bulb, and a fluid U.S. Patent Specifications medium having decreased density with increased temperature in the normal range of operating tem­ peratures contained within the recess whereby rotation These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained, price 25 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 2,699,219. Control of Gas-Turbine Engine Driven Propeller for Aircraft. Brian H. Slatter, Thomas G. Daish and Edwin G. Caswell, Coventry, England, assignors to Armstrong Siddeley Motors Limited, Coventry, England. Application July 8, 1951. Applica­ tion Great Britain, July 7, 1950. A throttle-controlled, propeller-driving, gas turbine engine, for an aircraft, including a pitch-change of the turbine wheel together with the heating of the mechanism connected to vary the pitch of a variable vane portion of the blade by the working fluid sets pitch propeller, pitch coarsening and fining passages up fluid flow in said recess causing a transfer of heat connected with said mechanism, a valve through which from the vane portion to said cooling bulb and a operating fluid under pressure can be selectively sup­ transfer of heat from the cooling bulb to a cooling plied to said passages, said valve connected to be fluid in said passage of the turbine wheel. movable by a governor mechanism for selecting the passage to be supplied, and additional means which with the inner ends of said screwjack means to cause is connected to be actuated by the throttle and which said wings to be actuated about their pivotal points, 2,700,424. Governor System for Rotorcraft. Harris selectively supplies fluid under pressure directly to and means for controlling the longitudinal movement S. Campbell, Bryn Athyn, Pa., assignor to The Fire­ said passages in a position intermediate said mechan­ of said centre section relative to said fuselage. stone Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. ism and said valve in such a manner that the propeller Application July 28, 1948. will very quickly absorb the change in the power 2,699,906. Air Inlet for Aeroplane Gaseous Com­ developed by the engine resulting from movement of A helicopter rotor control mechanism comprising a bustion Turbine Engines. William M. Lee, Chicago, the throttle while keeping the engine speed at a con­ rotor having pitch change mechanism associated Ill. and Julius Jonas, Los Angeles, Calif., assignors to stant predetermined value, at which latter it is always Northrop Aircraft, Inc., Hawthorne, Calif. Applica­ tion October 25, 1949. In an aeroplane driven by a gaseous combustion engine of the type having a compressor driven by a power turbine, a forwardly opening main air inlet on said aeroplane, a main air duct connecting said main air inlet with the inlet of said compressor, said main air duct having an inner wall adjacent an outer surface of said aeroplane at said compressor inlet, an auxiliary air duct between the inner wall of said main air duct and said outer surface of said aeroplane, said auxiliary air duct opening into said main air duct close to said compressor inlet, the length of said auxiliary air duct being substantially less than the length of said main air duct, the external opening of said auxiliary air duct being larger than the internal opening thereof to provide a bell-mouth type of entry, and a movable closure in said auxiliary air duct. maintained by said governor mechanism for any set­ ting of the throttle within the normal operating power range of the engine, said additional means including for the purpose a metering device having a cylinder therewith, a rotor drive including an input shaft having with a sliding and rolling piston therein, a valve with overrunning clutch means and a speed reduction unit two relatively rotatable parts for selectively controlling interposed therein, a hydraulic pump and tachometer the connexion of a source of fluid pressure cither to generator apparatus, said apparatus geared to and one operative end of said cylinder or to said pitch driven from said input shaft intermediate said over­ fining passage, a connexion between the other opera­ running clutch means and rotor, said apparatus being tive end of said cylinder and said pitch coarsening operatively associated with said rotor pitch change passage, a mechanical connexion between one of said mechanism. valve parts and said piston whereby said valve part is rotated by movement of said piston, and a mechanical connexion between the other of said valve parts and 2,700,515. Aeroplane Ram-Jet Propulsion System. the throttle whereby movement of the latter will Otto Reder, Madrid, Spain. Application March 17, rotate the said other of said valve parts, such that 1952. Application Spain July 31, 1951. when the throttle-actuated valve part is moved from the neutral position said piston will be operated by A ram-jet construction for an aeroplane comprising the pressure difference applied to it to effect a follow a fixed aerofoil element, a combustion chamber, 2,699,917. Turbine Wheel and Blade Construction. up movement of the piston-connected valve part to means for supplying fuel to said chamber located on Archie T. Colwell, Cleveland, Ohio, assignor to return the valve to the neutral position. said fixed aerofoil element, said combustion chamber Thompson Products, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio. Applica­ comprising a pair of movable walls, extensible means tion August 24, 1946. connecting said walls to said fixed element, said walls 2,699,300. Aircraft with Adjustable Swept-Back In a turbine rotor and blade assembly including a Wings. John C. Trotter, Williamsville and Robert H. rotatable turbine wheel having a periphery for anchor­ Dufort, Kenmore, N.Y., assignors to Bell Aircraft ing the roots of blades and a passage radially inward Corporation, Wheatfield, N.Y. Application April 20, from said periphery for flow of cooling fluid through it, the improvement of a blade having a root portion In an aeroplane, a fuselage, a centre wing section anchored in said periphery of the turbine wheel, a mounted upon said fuselage to permit longitudinal vane portion extending radially outward from the movement thereof relative to the fuselage, wings periphery of said turbine wheel and a cooling bulb having their root ends pivotally attached to said portion extending radially inward from said root centre section at points located between the leading portion across said passage of the turbine wheel, said and trailing edges of said wings, screwjack means vane portion adapted to be exposed to high tempera­ being movable by the internal pressure in said com­ having their outer ends connected to said wings at ture working fluid for producing operating forces to bustion chamber to a position spaced on each side of points opposite each other, curved wing tracks carried rotate said wheel, said cooling bulb being exposed said fixed element to provide an inlet and outlet for by said wings and arranged concentrically with the to cooling fluid in said passage of the turbine wheel, said combustion chamber when said ram-jet is operat­ pivotal points thereof, bearings carried by said centre said vane portion being constructed of high tempera­ ing and movable to form a continuation of the aero­ section and engaging said wing tracks, actuating means ture resisting material, said bulb portion being con­ foil construction of said fixed element when said ram­ carried by said centre section and having connexion jet is inoperative. structed of high thermal conductivity material, said Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1955

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