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U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications 196 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING June, 1938 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,110,516 . Airplane. Fred E. Weick, one another to control the tail wheel so that it Bcthcsda, Md., assignor to Fred E. Weick & swings rearwards with respect to the rear end of Associates, Inc., Hampton, Va., a corporation of th e fuselage during the initial movement together Virginia. Application Jan. 18, 1938. Serial of the two strut parts and then upwardly during the No . 185,634. 17 claims. [Class 244-75.] remainde r of such movement. 1. In aircraft, the combination of a body, a lifting surface, directionally fixed landing wheels 2.110.730 . Stall Indicator. Raymond P. t o the rear of the centre of gravity of the aircraft, Holland, Jr., Kenmore, N.Y., assignor to Curtiss- a normally freely castering landing wheel forward Wrigh t Corporation, a corporation of New York. of the aircraft centre of gravity and adapted for Application Nov. 6, 1936. Serial No. 109,423. co-operation with said directionally fixed landing 7 claims. [Class 244-1.] wheels t o provide a landing means for automatically 1. In aircraft including crow quarters and a changing the aircraft heading to the direction of wing having a zone at the leading edge thereof landing upon ground contact of said landing subject to pressure greater or less than atmos­ means when the aircraft is landing with side drift pheric in accordance with the and means for controlling the aircraft in normal wing angle of attack, a conduit manoeuvres in landing and flying comprising within said wing and opening solely a pitch control and a control for changing t o the atmosphere a t said zone, th e direction of flight. said conduit extending to said quarters , a check valve in said condui t permitting airilow only from said quarters 2,108,861 . Aeroplane Control Mechanism. towar d th e wing opening, and aural signalling means Cecil T. Kenyon, Wilmerding, Pa. Application operated by airflow in said conduit at the craw Jul y 19, 1935. Serial No. 32,201. 7 claims. quarter s end of said conduit. [Class 244-83.] 4. A control device for aeroplanes comprising 2.110.731 . De-Icer for Aeroplanes. Roy J. a horizontally disposed main shaft, means for Horrocks, Ionia, Mich. Application June 27, 1936. supporting said shaft for rotation in either direction, Serial No. 87,630. 7 claims. [Class 244-134.] a vertically arranged control lever having near 1. Means for preventing the formation of ice its lower end an offset portion pivoted to said on the wing of an aeroplane having an internal shaft whereby the latter may be rotated in either combustion engine and an exhaust pipe therefor, direction and the control lever moved backwardly comprising in a closed circuit a compression coil and forwardly, a steering shaft rotatably supported disposed within the wing, a gas compressor, means by the control lever with a major portion thereof connecting the high-pressure side of said compressor confined in said control lever and having a portion t o said compression coil, an expansion chamber, exposed by said offset portion whereby an operating means connecting said expansion chamber with 2,110,543 . Tall Wheel Structure. Robert medium may be connected to said steering shaft, W . Ayer, Wayne, Mich., assignor, by mesne an d manually operable means for rotating said assignments, to Aviation Manufacturing Corpora­ steering shaft and through th e medium of which the tion, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Delaware. movemen t of the control lever is adapted to be Application April 30, 1936. Serial No. 77,169. effected. 2 claims. [Class 244-109.] 1. In combination with an airplane, a tail wheel 2,109,427 . Retractable Landing Gear. Rene structur e comprising a substantially vertical oleo Lucien Lévy, Montrouge, France, assignor to stru t pivotally connected at its upper end to the Societe d'Inventions Aéronautiques et Mécaniques rear end of the fuselage so as t o swing lengthwise S.I.A.M., Fribourg, Switzerland. Application of the fuselage and consisting of an upper part Jan . 9, 1936. Serial No. 58,396. In France, an d a lower part connected telescopically and Jan . 12, 1935. 1 claim. [Class 244-102.] rotatabl y to the upper part and means for urging Retractabl e landing gear for aeroplanes com­ th e two parts apart, a tail wheel connected eccen­ prising, for a wheel, a supporting frame, a fixed trically to the lower part of the strut and supported pivot pin for this frame, a knee joint at one point of this frame, a control bar pivoting about a fixed said compression coil, means connecting said com­ poin t of the aeroplane and pivoted, on the other pression coil to said expansion chamber including hand , on the supporting frame at a point situated an expansion valve discharging into said expansion between the wheel and the point of articulation chamber, a substance in said system, said substance of said frame, an auxiliary leg pivoted, on the one being one normally gaseous a t the lowest pressure in hand, on the aeroplane and, on the other hand, on said system, and means for driving said compressor th e supporting frame, and a lifting device pivoted, t o compress said substance, said expansion chamber on the one hand, on the aeroplane and, on the other being disposed in heat exchange, relationship with hand, on said auxiliary leg. th e exhaust pipe of said internal combustion engine. 2,110,752 . Method of Applying Covering t o a Frame . Theodore P. Wright, Buffalo, N.Y., assignor to Curtiss-Wright Corporation, a corpora­ tion of New York. Application June 15, 1934. Serial No. 730,682. 4 claims. [Class 113-116.] 1. The method of applying a relatively thin sheet metal skin to an aircraft structure which comprises tensioning the skin within the elastic limit of th e skin material, compressing the structure t o a degree within the elastic limit thereof, fastening said skin to said structure, and removing the tensioning and compressing forces. b y said part so that it is free to swivel, a collar mounte d rotatably on the lower part of the strut an d held against axial displacement relatively theret o and an element extending forwardly and upwardl y from the collar, hinged at its rear end to * The above abstracts oi patents granted in the United States th e collar and at its front end to said rear end of are taken, by permission of the Department ot Commerce, from the Offtcial Gazztte of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of th e fuselage, and adapted when the tail wheel is the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the subjected to an upward and rearward load during Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. taxi-ing or landing of the airplane and the parts Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied of the strut are caused as a result to move toward by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 10 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1938

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030332
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

196 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING June, 1938 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,110,516 . Airplane. Fred E. Weick, one another to control the tail wheel so that it Bcthcsda, Md., assignor to Fred E. Weick & swings rearwards with respect to the rear end of Associates, Inc., Hampton, Va., a corporation of th e fuselage during the initial movement together Virginia. Application Jan. 18, 1938. Serial of the two strut parts and then upwardly during the No . 185,634. 17 claims. [Class 244-75.] remainde r of such movement. 1. In aircraft, the combination of a body, a lifting surface, directionally fixed landing wheels 2.110.730 . Stall Indicator. Raymond P. t o the rear of the centre of gravity of the aircraft, Holland, Jr., Kenmore, N.Y., assignor to Curtiss- a normally freely castering landing wheel forward Wrigh t Corporation, a corporation of New York. of the aircraft centre of gravity and adapted for Application Nov. 6, 1936. Serial No. 109,423. co-operation with said directionally fixed landing 7 claims. [Class 244-1.] wheels t o provide a landing means for automatically 1. In aircraft including crow quarters and a changing the aircraft heading to the direction of wing having a zone at the leading edge thereof landing upon ground contact of said landing subject to pressure greater or less than atmos­ means when the aircraft is landing with side drift pheric in accordance with the and means for controlling the aircraft in normal wing angle of attack, a conduit manoeuvres in landing and flying comprising within said wing and opening solely a pitch control and a control for changing t o the atmosphere a t said zone, th e direction of flight. said conduit extending to said quarters , a check valve in said condui t permitting airilow only from said quarters 2,108,861 . Aeroplane Control Mechanism. towar d th e wing opening, and aural signalling means Cecil T. Kenyon, Wilmerding, Pa. Application operated by airflow in said conduit at the craw Jul y 19, 1935. Serial No. 32,201. 7 claims. quarter s end of said conduit. [Class 244-83.] 4. A control device for aeroplanes comprising 2.110.731 . De-Icer for Aeroplanes. Roy J. a horizontally disposed main shaft, means for Horrocks, Ionia, Mich. Application June 27, 1936. supporting said shaft for rotation in either direction, Serial No. 87,630. 7 claims. [Class 244-134.] a vertically arranged control lever having near 1. Means for preventing the formation of ice its lower end an offset portion pivoted to said on the wing of an aeroplane having an internal shaft whereby the latter may be rotated in either combustion engine and an exhaust pipe therefor, direction and the control lever moved backwardly comprising in a closed circuit a compression coil and forwardly, a steering shaft rotatably supported disposed within the wing, a gas compressor, means by the control lever with a major portion thereof connecting the high-pressure side of said compressor confined in said control lever and having a portion t o said compression coil, an expansion chamber, exposed by said offset portion whereby an operating means connecting said expansion chamber with 2,110,543 . Tall Wheel Structure. Robert medium may be connected to said steering shaft, W . Ayer, Wayne, Mich., assignor, by mesne an d manually operable means for rotating said assignments, to Aviation Manufacturing Corpora­ steering shaft and through th e medium of which the tion, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Delaware. movemen t of the control lever is adapted to be Application April 30, 1936. Serial No. 77,169. effected. 2 claims. [Class 244-109.] 1. In combination with an airplane, a tail wheel 2,109,427 . Retractable Landing Gear. Rene structur e comprising a substantially vertical oleo Lucien Lévy, Montrouge, France, assignor to stru t pivotally connected at its upper end to the Societe d'Inventions Aéronautiques et Mécaniques rear end of the fuselage so as t o swing lengthwise S.I.A.M., Fribourg, Switzerland. Application of the fuselage and consisting of an upper part Jan . 9, 1936. Serial No. 58,396. In France, an d a lower part connected telescopically and Jan . 12, 1935. 1 claim. [Class 244-102.] rotatabl y to the upper part and means for urging Retractabl e landing gear for aeroplanes com­ th e two parts apart, a tail wheel connected eccen­ prising, for a wheel, a supporting frame, a fixed trically to the lower part of the strut and supported pivot pin for this frame, a knee joint at one point of this frame, a control bar pivoting about a fixed said compression coil, means connecting said com­ poin t of the aeroplane and pivoted, on the other pression coil to said expansion chamber including hand , on the supporting frame at a point situated an expansion valve discharging into said expansion between the wheel and the point of articulation chamber, a substance in said system, said substance of said frame, an auxiliary leg pivoted, on the one being one normally gaseous a t the lowest pressure in hand, on the aeroplane and, on the other hand, on said system, and means for driving said compressor th e supporting frame, and a lifting device pivoted, t o compress said substance, said expansion chamber on the one hand, on the aeroplane and, on the other being disposed in heat exchange, relationship with hand, on said auxiliary leg. th e exhaust pipe of said internal combustion engine. 2,110,752 . Method of Applying Covering t o a Frame . Theodore P. Wright, Buffalo, N.Y., assignor to Curtiss-Wright Corporation, a corpora­ tion of New York. Application June 15, 1934. Serial No. 730,682. 4 claims. [Class 113-116.] 1. The method of applying a relatively thin sheet metal skin to an aircraft structure which comprises tensioning the skin within the elastic limit of th e skin material, compressing the structure t o a degree within the elastic limit thereof, fastening said skin to said structure, and removing the tensioning and compressing forces. b y said part so that it is free to swivel, a collar mounte d rotatably on the lower part of the strut an d held against axial displacement relatively theret o and an element extending forwardly and upwardl y from the collar, hinged at its rear end to * The above abstracts oi patents granted in the United States th e collar and at its front end to said rear end of are taken, by permission of the Department ot Commerce, from the Offtcial Gazztte of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of th e fuselage, and adapted when the tail wheel is the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the subjected to an upward and rearward load during Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. taxi-ing or landing of the airplane and the parts Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied of the strut are caused as a result to move toward by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1938

There are no references for this article.