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U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications second and third throttle valves, whereby in operation said first throttle valve is adjusted to maintain said U.S. Patent Specifications pressure drop directly proportional to the square of engine speed; pressure responsive means responsive to boost pressure p and to ambient atmospheric These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the pressure p ; an operative connexion between said Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies 1 pressure responsive means and said second throttle of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, valve, whereby said second throttle-valve is adjusted Washington, D.C., U.S.A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, solely by said pressure responsive means to have an area Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. which varies according to the function 2,529,026. Apparatus for Profiling Operations. necting the other end of said radius rod to said leg; Thomas Aubrey Kestell, Thurmaston, England, a part fixed with respect to said leg; and a part on where n is a constant approximately equal to the assignor to Power Jets (Research and Development) said drag link directly engageable with said part fixed compression ratio of the engine; temperature respon­ Limited, London, England. Application August 21, with respect to said leg when said leg is in lowered sive means responsive to induction temperature t ; an 1945. In Great Britain January 27, 1944. position, whereby landing load is transmitted from e operative connexion between said temperature re­ said leg through said drag link to said aircraft without sponsive means and said third throttle valve; whereby being transmitted through said radius rod. said third throttle valve is adjusted solely by said temperature responsive device to have an area which varies according to the function (t —t ), t being a 0 c 0 mean value of induction temperature; the combina­ tion being operative to control the fuel flow F through said conduit in accordance with the equation where k1 and k are constants. 2,529,377. Undercarriage Suspension for Aircraft. Henry Davies, Stockton Heath, England, assignor to Electro-Hydraulics Limited, Warrington, Lancashire, England, a company of Great Britain. Application November 8, 1948. In Great Britain December 3, 2,529,629. Rotary-Wing Aircraft with Plural Rotors. Cyril George Pullin, Tadburn, Ampfield, and Kenneth Watson, Woolston, Southampton, England, assignors, by mesne assignments, to Aurogiro Com­ pany of America, Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Delaware. Application July 26, 1947. In Great Britain July 30, 1946. In an aircraft having at least three sustaining rotors arranged to rotate on spaced generally upright axes 2,531,761. Thermal Jet and Rocket Motor Propul­ offset in different directions from the centre of gravity sion System. Maurice J. Zucrow, Altadena, Calif., of the aircraft, a flight-control system which comprises assignor to Aerojet Engineering Corporation, Azusa, in combination with control means, a spider or like Calif., a corporation of Delaware. Application member which can be tilted about any horizontal axis December 2, 1944. and has as many arms or linkage pick-up points as In combination with a thermal jet system for pro­ there are rotors, which arms or pick-up points are dis­ pelling an aircraft, comprising an air compressor, a posed in plan in corresponding relationship to the gas turbine mechanically linked to the compressor, lines joining the several rotor centres to the c.g. of the and a combustion chamber into which fuel is intro­ aircraft, and independent control circuits operated by duced and burned in the air from the compressor to the control means for displacing the spider or like In an aircraft undercarriage suspension, a cross provide heat pressurized gases for driving the turbine, member in the pitching and rolling planes respectively the improvement which comprises a second turbine, a member having spaced bearings for mounting said each of said spider arms or pick-up points being con­ second combustion chamber and a source of pro- cross member on an aircraft and a bearing part be­ nected to means for varying the lift of the corre­ pellant for introduction into the second combustion tween said spaced bearings; a resilient telescopic unit sponding rotor, in such a way that the control system having a part mounted in said bearing part for sliding chamber, means for driving the second turbine from is 'isotropic' in the sense herein defined. movement relative to said cross member; and tie said second combustion chamber, a rocket jet motor members pivotally connected respectively to said unit operated from said propellant, pumping means driven and to said cross member at points spaced from said from the second turbine for pumping propellant into bearing part, whereby the undercarriage vertical load the rocket jet motor and into the second combustion is transmitted from said unit to said cross member chamber, and means disconneetably connected with wholly through said tic members. the thermal jet system for driving the pumping means. 2,529,401. Retractable Undercarriage for Aircraft. Derek Tom Lawson, Liverpool, England, assignor to Electro-Hydraulics Limited, Warrington, England, a company of Great Britain. Application August 23, 1948. In Great Britain August 25, 1947. 2,529,900. Fuel Flow Control for Internal-Com­ bustion Engines. Paul Whibley Bedale, Littleover, Derby, and John Oliver Philip Hughes, Duffield, Eng­ land, assignor to Rolls-Royce Limited, Derby, Eng­ land, a British company. Application October 29, 1946. In Great Britain October 3, 1945. A fuel-injection device for a supercharged internal combustion engine comprising in combination a fuel- pump; a discharge conduct from said fuel-pump; a 2,532,721. Cooling Turbine Rotor. Andrew Kah- tinsky, Eagleville, Conn., and Carl R. Soderberg, first throttle valve in said conduit; a second throttle Weston, Mass., assignors to United Aircraft Corpora­ valve in said conduit in scries with and downstream tion, East Hartford, Conn., a corporation of Dela­ In a retractable undercarriage for aircraft, an under­ of said first throttle valve; a third throttle valve in said tion of Delaware. Application August 23, 1944. carriage leg mounted on the aircraft for movements to conduit in series with said first throttle valve and in lowered and to retracted positions; a foldable struc­ parallel with said second throttle valve; a speed- A turbine rotor including a number of discs, each ture comprising a drag link, a radius rod, and means responsive loading device loading said first throttle having a row of blades thereon, each of said discs pivotally connecting one end of said drag link to one valve to open with a load proportional to the square having annular side surfaces engaging similar surfaces end of said radius rod; means fixed with respect to said of engine speed N; a pressure-responsive loading de­ on adjacent discs, means for introducing gas to the aircraft pivotally connecting the other end of said vice loading said first throttle valve to close with a interior of the rotor and passages for escape of gas drag link directly to the aircraft; means pivotally con­ load proportional to the pressure drop across said between said engaging surfaces. 92 Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 23 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1951

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032017
Publisher site
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Abstract

second and third throttle valves, whereby in operation said first throttle valve is adjusted to maintain said U.S. Patent Specifications pressure drop directly proportional to the square of engine speed; pressure responsive means responsive to boost pressure p and to ambient atmospheric These details and drawings of patents granted in the United States are taken, by permission of the pressure p ; an operative connexion between said Department of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office'. Printed copies 1 pressure responsive means and said second throttle of the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the Commissioner of Patents, valve, whereby said second throttle-valve is adjusted Washington, D.C., U.S.A. They are usually available for inspection at the British Patent Office, solely by said pressure responsive means to have an area Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. which varies according to the function 2,529,026. Apparatus for Profiling Operations. necting the other end of said radius rod to said leg; Thomas Aubrey Kestell, Thurmaston, England, a part fixed with respect to said leg; and a part on where n is a constant approximately equal to the assignor to Power Jets (Research and Development) said drag link directly engageable with said part fixed compression ratio of the engine; temperature respon­ Limited, London, England. Application August 21, with respect to said leg when said leg is in lowered sive means responsive to induction temperature t ; an 1945. In Great Britain January 27, 1944. position, whereby landing load is transmitted from e operative connexion between said temperature re­ said leg through said drag link to said aircraft without sponsive means and said third throttle valve; whereby being transmitted through said radius rod. said third throttle valve is adjusted solely by said temperature responsive device to have an area which varies according to the function (t —t ), t being a 0 c 0 mean value of induction temperature; the combina­ tion being operative to control the fuel flow F through said conduit in accordance with the equation where k1 and k are constants. 2,529,377. Undercarriage Suspension for Aircraft. Henry Davies, Stockton Heath, England, assignor to Electro-Hydraulics Limited, Warrington, Lancashire, England, a company of Great Britain. Application November 8, 1948. In Great Britain December 3, 2,529,629. Rotary-Wing Aircraft with Plural Rotors. Cyril George Pullin, Tadburn, Ampfield, and Kenneth Watson, Woolston, Southampton, England, assignors, by mesne assignments, to Aurogiro Com­ pany of America, Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Delaware. Application July 26, 1947. In Great Britain July 30, 1946. In an aircraft having at least three sustaining rotors arranged to rotate on spaced generally upright axes 2,531,761. Thermal Jet and Rocket Motor Propul­ offset in different directions from the centre of gravity sion System. Maurice J. Zucrow, Altadena, Calif., of the aircraft, a flight-control system which comprises assignor to Aerojet Engineering Corporation, Azusa, in combination with control means, a spider or like Calif., a corporation of Delaware. Application member which can be tilted about any horizontal axis December 2, 1944. and has as many arms or linkage pick-up points as In combination with a thermal jet system for pro­ there are rotors, which arms or pick-up points are dis­ pelling an aircraft, comprising an air compressor, a posed in plan in corresponding relationship to the gas turbine mechanically linked to the compressor, lines joining the several rotor centres to the c.g. of the and a combustion chamber into which fuel is intro­ aircraft, and independent control circuits operated by duced and burned in the air from the compressor to the control means for displacing the spider or like In an aircraft undercarriage suspension, a cross provide heat pressurized gases for driving the turbine, member in the pitching and rolling planes respectively the improvement which comprises a second turbine, a member having spaced bearings for mounting said each of said spider arms or pick-up points being con­ second combustion chamber and a source of pro- cross member on an aircraft and a bearing part be­ nected to means for varying the lift of the corre­ pellant for introduction into the second combustion tween said spaced bearings; a resilient telescopic unit sponding rotor, in such a way that the control system having a part mounted in said bearing part for sliding chamber, means for driving the second turbine from is 'isotropic' in the sense herein defined. movement relative to said cross member; and tie said second combustion chamber, a rocket jet motor members pivotally connected respectively to said unit operated from said propellant, pumping means driven and to said cross member at points spaced from said from the second turbine for pumping propellant into bearing part, whereby the undercarriage vertical load the rocket jet motor and into the second combustion is transmitted from said unit to said cross member chamber, and means disconneetably connected with wholly through said tic members. the thermal jet system for driving the pumping means. 2,529,401. Retractable Undercarriage for Aircraft. Derek Tom Lawson, Liverpool, England, assignor to Electro-Hydraulics Limited, Warrington, England, a company of Great Britain. Application August 23, 1948. In Great Britain August 25, 1947. 2,529,900. Fuel Flow Control for Internal-Com­ bustion Engines. Paul Whibley Bedale, Littleover, Derby, and John Oliver Philip Hughes, Duffield, Eng­ land, assignor to Rolls-Royce Limited, Derby, Eng­ land, a British company. Application October 29, 1946. In Great Britain October 3, 1945. A fuel-injection device for a supercharged internal combustion engine comprising in combination a fuel- pump; a discharge conduct from said fuel-pump; a 2,532,721. Cooling Turbine Rotor. Andrew Kah- tinsky, Eagleville, Conn., and Carl R. Soderberg, first throttle valve in said conduit; a second throttle Weston, Mass., assignors to United Aircraft Corpora­ valve in said conduit in scries with and downstream tion, East Hartford, Conn., a corporation of Dela­ In a retractable undercarriage for aircraft, an under­ of said first throttle valve; a third throttle valve in said tion of Delaware. Application August 23, 1944. carriage leg mounted on the aircraft for movements to conduit in series with said first throttle valve and in lowered and to retracted positions; a foldable struc­ parallel with said second throttle valve; a speed- A turbine rotor including a number of discs, each ture comprising a drag link, a radius rod, and means responsive loading device loading said first throttle having a row of blades thereon, each of said discs pivotally connecting one end of said drag link to one valve to open with a load proportional to the square having annular side surfaces engaging similar surfaces end of said radius rod; means fixed with respect to said of engine speed N; a pressure-responsive loading de­ on adjacent discs, means for introducing gas to the aircraft pivotally connecting the other end of said vice loading said first throttle valve to close with a interior of the rotor and passages for escape of gas drag link directly to the aircraft; means pivotally con­ load proportional to the pressure drop across said between said engaging surfaces. 92 Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1951

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