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U.S. Patent Specifications

U.S. Patent Specifications 282 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING October, 1937 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,087,919 . Propeller Blade. Joseph J. Mascuch, Isaac P. Rodman, and Glen T. Lampton, Newark, N.J., assignors to Breeze Corporations, Inc., Newark, N.J., a corporation of New Jersey. Application August 30, 1933. Serial No. 687,408. 1 claim. [Class 170-159.] A hollow, one-piece aircraft propeller blade free of seams or welds formed of an air hardening 2,086,101 . Synchronization of Engines. alloy nickel steel of uniform hardness and having Hug h M. Stoller, Mountain Lakes, N.J., assignor a tensile strength of at least one hundred fifty t o Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, New thousan d pounds per square inch. York , N.Y., a corporation of New York. Appli­ directly on one of said elements, the centre of cation March 14, 1936. Serial No. 68,892. 6 claims. mass of said propulsion unit being located ahead [Class 60-97.] of said pivotal axis, with a landing gear pivoted 1. In an aircraft, a plurality of internal com­ on one of said elements for extension and retraction, bustio n engines each having an exhaust manifold mechanism connected at one end to said landing an d operated at substantially the same speeds, gear and supporting at least a part of the weight propellers connected to said engines having their thereof, said mechanism at its other end being pitches so adjusted that the engines may bo connected to said propulsion unit at a point dis­ operate d at the same speeds and each develop placed from said pivotal axis, an d common actuating th e same driving power, and means comprising a means for operating said landing gear and simul­ direct gas connection between the manifolds of taneously, and in dependence thereupon, tilting said engines subjected only to the pressures caused said propulsion unit relative to said hull and said b y the engine exhaust gases operating against wings, in a sense opposite to that in which the th e friction of the exhaust conduit for so equalising landing gear moves, whereby the weight of the th e back pressures on the cylinders of the engines landing gear at least partially balances the weight. as to exert a force tending to hold the engines in synchronism and ensure alternate explosions. 2,089,749 . Valve. Robert Jardine, Detroit, Mich., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Eaton 2,086,200 . Fluid pressure device for aircraft Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio, a cor­ an d other purposes . Joseph Wright, Stoke Park, poratio n of Ohio. Application November 2, 1933. Coventry, England, assignor to Dunlop Rubber Serial No. 696,404. 3 claims. [Class 123-177.] 2,088,413 . Helicopter and Rotating Wing Co., Ltd., London, England, a British company. 1. A liquid-cooled poppet valve for internal- Aircraft . Raoul Hafner, Vienna, Austria. Appli­ Application Nov. 21, 1936. Serial No. 112,045. combustion engines having a hermetically-closed cation March 21, 1935. Serial No. 12,127. In In Great Britain Dec. 30, 1935. 7 claims. [Class chambe r in the head and stem with the chamber of Grea t Britain March 29, 1934. 7 claims. [Class 244-134.1 larger diameter in the head of the valve comprising 244-17.] 1. In a rotary wing aircraft the combination, with a rotary hub member, of a plurality of blades extendin g substantially radially outwards there­ from and respectively articulated thereto about transvers e flapping axes intersecting each other an d the rotary axis of said hub member at sub­ 1. Apparatus for distributing a fluid over the stantiall y a single point, a central boss and an surfaces of aircraft or other vehicles comprising oute r ring carried by said hub member coaxially a sheet of material permeable to said fluid to therewith, and forks at the inner ends of said cover said surfaces, a hollow member having blades each embracing said rotary axis and pivoted openings in its walls communicating with said by its arms about one of said flapping axes, said a steel body portion forming the stem and lower sheet, and a distensible tube in said member to forks lying in the annular space between said par t of the head, a separate top portion, and an expel fluid from the said member by th e distention. annula r weld of cobalt alloy integrally inter-con- necting and sealing said portions, the cobalt alloy 2,087,626 . Method of Constructin g Airplane weld also covering the peripheral parts of the valve Wings . Robert J. Minshall, Seattle, Wash., head to provide a thin hard layer over the seat assignor to Boeing Aircraft Company, Seattle, Wash. , a corporation of Washington. Application portions of the valve, and a quantity of cooling March 25, 1935. Serial No. 12,888. 12 claims. medium partly filling the closed chamber. [Class 29-84.] 2,090,775 . Twisted Fairing. Theodore P. 1. The method of constructing airplane wings, Wright , Buffalo, N.Y., assignor, by mesne assign­ for their support on spaced spars, which com­ ments , to Curtiss-Wright Corporation, a corporation prises the steps of building separately the leading of New York. Application March 30, 1934. Serial edge structure to fit the front spar, the upper No. 718,118. 3 claims. [Class 244-130.] intcrspa r surface, and the lower interspar surface, 1. A streamlined strut for aircraft wherein the each to fit between the spars, and the trailing major axes of successive cross sections of said edge structure , minus the skin a t one side, and then, stru t arc angularly divergent one from the other in succession, installing the same on the rear spar, withou t a break in continuity of either the leading installing one of the interspar surfaces in place, or the trailing edge of said strut. building the intcrsurface bracing between the spars an d secured to the installed intcrspar surface, installing the other intcrspar surface in place and connecting to the same the intcrsurface bracing, an d thereafter, without regard to priority, in­ stalling the other trailing edge skin, the leading centra l boss and said outer ring in mutually over­ edge structure, and the control surface closures. lapping relationship, each with its arms respectively radially inside and outside their neighbours and pivotally attached to points on said boss and said ring respectively. 2,088,692 . Flying Machine. Claude Dornier, Friedrichshafen - on - the - Bodensee, Germany, assignor of one-half to Dornier-Mctallbauten G.m.b.H., Fricdrichshafen-on-the-Bodensee, Ger­ many . Application March 1, 1934. Serial No. * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States 713,450. In Germany March 3, 1933. 5 claims. are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from tile Official Gaicttc of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of [Class 244-102.] the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the 1. In an aeroplane comprising a hull element Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. an d wing elements, the combination of at least Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied by drawings if none is reproduced. one propulsion unit mounted upon a pivotal axis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

U.S. Patent Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 9 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1937

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Emerald Publishing
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Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
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0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030237
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Abstract

282 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING October, 1937 Some Recent Patents of Aeronautical Interest Granted in the U.S.A. 2,087,919 . Propeller Blade. Joseph J. Mascuch, Isaac P. Rodman, and Glen T. Lampton, Newark, N.J., assignors to Breeze Corporations, Inc., Newark, N.J., a corporation of New Jersey. Application August 30, 1933. Serial No. 687,408. 1 claim. [Class 170-159.] A hollow, one-piece aircraft propeller blade free of seams or welds formed of an air hardening 2,086,101 . Synchronization of Engines. alloy nickel steel of uniform hardness and having Hug h M. Stoller, Mountain Lakes, N.J., assignor a tensile strength of at least one hundred fifty t o Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, New thousan d pounds per square inch. York , N.Y., a corporation of New York. Appli­ directly on one of said elements, the centre of cation March 14, 1936. Serial No. 68,892. 6 claims. mass of said propulsion unit being located ahead [Class 60-97.] of said pivotal axis, with a landing gear pivoted 1. In an aircraft, a plurality of internal com­ on one of said elements for extension and retraction, bustio n engines each having an exhaust manifold mechanism connected at one end to said landing an d operated at substantially the same speeds, gear and supporting at least a part of the weight propellers connected to said engines having their thereof, said mechanism at its other end being pitches so adjusted that the engines may bo connected to said propulsion unit at a point dis­ operate d at the same speeds and each develop placed from said pivotal axis, an d common actuating th e same driving power, and means comprising a means for operating said landing gear and simul­ direct gas connection between the manifolds of taneously, and in dependence thereupon, tilting said engines subjected only to the pressures caused said propulsion unit relative to said hull and said b y the engine exhaust gases operating against wings, in a sense opposite to that in which the th e friction of the exhaust conduit for so equalising landing gear moves, whereby the weight of the th e back pressures on the cylinders of the engines landing gear at least partially balances the weight. as to exert a force tending to hold the engines in synchronism and ensure alternate explosions. 2,089,749 . Valve. Robert Jardine, Detroit, Mich., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Eaton 2,086,200 . Fluid pressure device for aircraft Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio, a cor­ an d other purposes . Joseph Wright, Stoke Park, poratio n of Ohio. Application November 2, 1933. Coventry, England, assignor to Dunlop Rubber Serial No. 696,404. 3 claims. [Class 123-177.] 2,088,413 . Helicopter and Rotating Wing Co., Ltd., London, England, a British company. 1. A liquid-cooled poppet valve for internal- Aircraft . Raoul Hafner, Vienna, Austria. Appli­ Application Nov. 21, 1936. Serial No. 112,045. combustion engines having a hermetically-closed cation March 21, 1935. Serial No. 12,127. In In Great Britain Dec. 30, 1935. 7 claims. [Class chambe r in the head and stem with the chamber of Grea t Britain March 29, 1934. 7 claims. [Class 244-134.1 larger diameter in the head of the valve comprising 244-17.] 1. In a rotary wing aircraft the combination, with a rotary hub member, of a plurality of blades extendin g substantially radially outwards there­ from and respectively articulated thereto about transvers e flapping axes intersecting each other an d the rotary axis of said hub member at sub­ 1. Apparatus for distributing a fluid over the stantiall y a single point, a central boss and an surfaces of aircraft or other vehicles comprising oute r ring carried by said hub member coaxially a sheet of material permeable to said fluid to therewith, and forks at the inner ends of said cover said surfaces, a hollow member having blades each embracing said rotary axis and pivoted openings in its walls communicating with said by its arms about one of said flapping axes, said a steel body portion forming the stem and lower sheet, and a distensible tube in said member to forks lying in the annular space between said par t of the head, a separate top portion, and an expel fluid from the said member by th e distention. annula r weld of cobalt alloy integrally inter-con- necting and sealing said portions, the cobalt alloy 2,087,626 . Method of Constructin g Airplane weld also covering the peripheral parts of the valve Wings . Robert J. Minshall, Seattle, Wash., head to provide a thin hard layer over the seat assignor to Boeing Aircraft Company, Seattle, Wash. , a corporation of Washington. Application portions of the valve, and a quantity of cooling March 25, 1935. Serial No. 12,888. 12 claims. medium partly filling the closed chamber. [Class 29-84.] 2,090,775 . Twisted Fairing. Theodore P. 1. The method of constructing airplane wings, Wright , Buffalo, N.Y., assignor, by mesne assign­ for their support on spaced spars, which com­ ments , to Curtiss-Wright Corporation, a corporation prises the steps of building separately the leading of New York. Application March 30, 1934. Serial edge structure to fit the front spar, the upper No. 718,118. 3 claims. [Class 244-130.] intcrspa r surface, and the lower interspar surface, 1. A streamlined strut for aircraft wherein the each to fit between the spars, and the trailing major axes of successive cross sections of said edge structure , minus the skin a t one side, and then, stru t arc angularly divergent one from the other in succession, installing the same on the rear spar, withou t a break in continuity of either the leading installing one of the interspar surfaces in place, or the trailing edge of said strut. building the intcrsurface bracing between the spars an d secured to the installed intcrspar surface, installing the other intcrspar surface in place and connecting to the same the intcrsurface bracing, an d thereafter, without regard to priority, in­ stalling the other trailing edge skin, the leading centra l boss and said outer ring in mutually over­ edge structure, and the control surface closures. lapping relationship, each with its arms respectively radially inside and outside their neighbours and pivotally attached to points on said boss and said ring respectively. 2,088,692 . Flying Machine. Claude Dornier, Friedrichshafen - on - the - Bodensee, Germany, assignor of one-half to Dornier-Mctallbauten G.m.b.H., Fricdrichshafen-on-the-Bodensee, Ger­ many . Application March 1, 1934. Serial No. * The above abstracts of patents granted in the United States 713,450. In Germany March 3, 1933. 5 claims. are taken, by permission of the Department of Commerce, from tile Official Gaicttc of the United States Patent Office. Printed copies of [Class 244-102.] the full specifications can be obtained, price 10 cents each, from the 1. In an aeroplane comprising a hull element Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. an d wing elements, the combination of at least Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied by drawings if none is reproduced. one propulsion unit mounted upon a pivotal axis

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1937

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