Two Publications Reviewed

Two Publications Reviewed 122 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING May, 1931 A Second Edition for Ground Engineers and a Good Popular Book on Airships Th e Care and Maintenance of Aircraft. of Engines. Chapter IX. The Installation and post-wa r period, one or two debatable state­ Secon d Edition. By Various Authors. (Air­ Testin g of Engine Performance Instruments. ment s are made. It is at least doubtful whether ways Publications, Ltd., 3s. 6d.). Chapte r X. The Installation and Testing of Air­ in fact the stability and control of the "Bodensee " Th e fact that a second edition of a technical work craft Performance Instruments. Chapter XI . The were unsatisfactory. On page 119 it is stated of this nature was called for within three months Installatio n and Checking of Turn Indicators and tha t "the maximum stresses with a fast air­ of the publication of the first is its own testimony Compasses. Chapter XII. The Composition, shi p are now known to occur in circling flight, t o the value of the contents. Structur e and Treatment of Metallic Materials. an d it was under these conditions, which the R.38 As readers will know, it constitutes a reissue of the Chapte r XIII . Mechanical Tests for the Examina­ ha d not been designed to withstand, that the series of articles that, with the title " A Course for tion of Metallic Materials. Chapter XIV. The disaster occurred." The report of the Accidents Ground Engineers," were published in the first Non-Metallic Materials used in Aircraft Construc­ Investigatio n Sub-Committee surely arrived at the fifteen numbers of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. This tion. Those who have contributed are:—Mr. A. conclusion that a higher bending moment can be McIsaac, Mr. S. G. Young, Mr. W. P . Savage, Major reached than obtains under conditions of steady course, written by a number of authors within the A. A. Ross, Mr. R. W. Sloley, Mr. J. J. A. Gilmore turnin g under full helm, and certainly when R.38 Aircraft Inspection Directorate and outside, covered an d Dr. G. Rudorf. failed she was doing rudder trials "swinging about th e whole field required to be known by a prospective ground engineer preparing himself to sit for the an approximately straight course—executing al­ W . L. M. official Air Ministry examination. Dealing as they ternatel y partial turns to port and starboard"— do primarily with fundamentals the chapters are t o quote from the Report—which is scarcely Th e Airship . Its Design , History , Operation unlikely to become out-of-date for some years, and "circlin g flight." an d Future . By Christophe r Sprigg. (Samp­ th e book can therefore be relied upon to remain a son Low, 12s. 6d.) Obtainable from AIRCRAFT On page 199, the author makes the startling stand-b y to which the possessor may safely con­ ENGINEERING . statemen t that "of the 127 craft built by the tinu e to turn for reference. The private owner Th e appearance of any book on airships is, in Zeppelin Company, apart from damages due to who wishes to fit himself for doing his own running these days an event, and even though, as in this enem y action, loss of life has been in every case repairs, and even carry out a periodical refit, will case, it is intended primarily for popular consump­ du e to ignition of th e hydrogen. The sole exception find nothing here too advanced for his purpose and tion, the courage of the author and publishers is the 'Dixmude'. " There are several inaccuracies should also find it of great use and value. deserves the recognition of an extended review. in this. In the first place, the Zeppelin Company Turnin g over the pages of this new edition one Mr. Christopher Sprigg's name is not known as hav e not built 127 airships, but only 118, including canno t help being again struck by the uniformity th e "Graf Zeppelin," The author has forgotten an airship enthusiast, and this book is the more wit h which the different writers have succeeded in tha t although this ship is numbered L.Z.127, there welcome for coming from the pen of one who is not moulding themselves to the common end. It is were two gaps—between L.72 (the last war-time suspect on account of close association with lighter- impossible t o pick ou t one chapte r more tha n another airship, numbered L.Z.I 14) and the "Bodensee" than-ai r aircraft in the past, particularly as he for special praise. All are admirably lucid and (L.Z.120), and between the "Nordstern " (L.Z.121) shows tha t he has made a close stud y of th e subject. thoroughl y practical. There can seldom have been and the "Lo s Angeles" (L.Z.126)—so tha t 9 ships His attitude towards the ever-present contro­ a n "omnibus " volume in which an editor could in the sequence of numbering were never built. versy between the airship and the aeroplane, which mor e justifiably congratulate himself on the way his H e has forgotten also tha t L. 1 collapsed in the air seems likely to continue, despite much lip-service author s have carried out his intentions. in 1913, in somewhat similar circumstances to the to the theory of "roo m in the air for both," is made Owing to the second edition being merely a late r "Shenandoah" disaster, and killed all her clear in an introductory chapter, and elaborated in reprin t of the first the following small misprints crew, without catching fire. Actually, so far as the a final summary entitled "To-morrow." remain uncorrected: p. 15, for "4½ in. tucks " read presen t writer knows, only three Zeppelins (L.2, Th e book starts, after the introductory chapter L.10 and L.59) have caused fatalities by catching "fou r and a half tucks" ; p. 43, 5 lines from the alread y mentioned, with an adequate summary for fire. Mention of L.59 brings us to the fact that the end, for "Category B," read "Category C"; th e non-technical reader of the principles of lift, "ful l list of German Zeppelins and their fate" p . 51, for "Chapters V and VI," read "Chapters an d then goes on to describe in general terms the printe d in an Appendix from an article by Captain I V and V." design and construction of balloon and "pressure Erns t Lehmann is by no means reliable. L.2 does airships"—whic h excellent phrase the author T o those who are unfamiliar with it, the scope no t occur in his list a t all ; L.59 is shown as "sho t adopt s to cover the non-rigid and semi-rigid types of the book can, perhaps, best be indicated by down by enemy," which was not the case; while recapitulatin g the table of contents. Chapter I. which, as he points out, in some of their manifesta­ L.9 is given twice, as is also the first "Ersatz Th e Erection and Alignment of the Aeroplane tion s so resemble each other as to become almost Deutschland. " The only fully complete and reliable Structure . Chapter II. Controls, Supply Systems indistinguishable. This is all well done but when list the present writer has seen was published in an d Inspection before Flight. Chapter III. In­ th e structure of the rigid airship comes to be dealt th e American paper Automotive Industries of May, spection of Structure and Component Parts after with, the author is rather less happy. He classes 19, 1921. Overhaul . Chapter IV. Dismantling and Top rigid airships into two divisions—Zeppelin and British practice. This seems to bring R.100 and Overhau l of the Engine. Chapter V. Engine I t has been felt worth while to call attention to R.101 closer together than is justified. The mere Running-in after Top Overhaul, and Routine a few small blemishes in this book, because it is on omission of intermediate longitudinals and trans­ Inspection. Chapter VI. Inspection of Engine th e whole excellently well calculated to fulfil the verse frames hardly differentiates the former from Installatio n and Instruments after Overhaul. purpose for which it is designed. As a popular th e "Gra f Zeppelin" as much as is implied, whereas Chapte r VII . Workshop Manipulation and Testing exposition of the characteristics and possibilities of ther e were many features purely special to R.101. of Engine Materials and Parts. Chapter VIII. th e airship it can be thoroughly recommended. Th e Complete Overhaul and Subsequent Testing In a chapter dealing with the immediate \V. L. M. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Two Publications Reviewed

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 3 (5): 1 – May 1, 1931

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/two-publications-reviewed-ScRS2UB5bA
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029399
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

122 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING May, 1931 A Second Edition for Ground Engineers and a Good Popular Book on Airships Th e Care and Maintenance of Aircraft. of Engines. Chapter IX. The Installation and post-wa r period, one or two debatable state­ Secon d Edition. By Various Authors. (Air­ Testin g of Engine Performance Instruments. ment s are made. It is at least doubtful whether ways Publications, Ltd., 3s. 6d.). Chapte r X. The Installation and Testing of Air­ in fact the stability and control of the "Bodensee " Th e fact that a second edition of a technical work craft Performance Instruments. Chapter XI . The were unsatisfactory. On page 119 it is stated of this nature was called for within three months Installatio n and Checking of Turn Indicators and tha t "the maximum stresses with a fast air­ of the publication of the first is its own testimony Compasses. Chapter XII. The Composition, shi p are now known to occur in circling flight, t o the value of the contents. Structur e and Treatment of Metallic Materials. an d it was under these conditions, which the R.38 As readers will know, it constitutes a reissue of the Chapte r XIII . Mechanical Tests for the Examina­ ha d not been designed to withstand, that the series of articles that, with the title " A Course for tion of Metallic Materials. Chapter XIV. The disaster occurred." The report of the Accidents Ground Engineers," were published in the first Non-Metallic Materials used in Aircraft Construc­ Investigatio n Sub-Committee surely arrived at the fifteen numbers of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. This tion. Those who have contributed are:—Mr. A. conclusion that a higher bending moment can be McIsaac, Mr. S. G. Young, Mr. W. P . Savage, Major reached than obtains under conditions of steady course, written by a number of authors within the A. A. Ross, Mr. R. W. Sloley, Mr. J. J. A. Gilmore turnin g under full helm, and certainly when R.38 Aircraft Inspection Directorate and outside, covered an d Dr. G. Rudorf. failed she was doing rudder trials "swinging about th e whole field required to be known by a prospective ground engineer preparing himself to sit for the an approximately straight course—executing al­ W . L. M. official Air Ministry examination. Dealing as they ternatel y partial turns to port and starboard"— do primarily with fundamentals the chapters are t o quote from the Report—which is scarcely Th e Airship . Its Design , History , Operation unlikely to become out-of-date for some years, and "circlin g flight." an d Future . By Christophe r Sprigg. (Samp­ th e book can therefore be relied upon to remain a son Low, 12s. 6d.) Obtainable from AIRCRAFT On page 199, the author makes the startling stand-b y to which the possessor may safely con­ ENGINEERING . statemen t that "of the 127 craft built by the tinu e to turn for reference. The private owner Th e appearance of any book on airships is, in Zeppelin Company, apart from damages due to who wishes to fit himself for doing his own running these days an event, and even though, as in this enem y action, loss of life has been in every case repairs, and even carry out a periodical refit, will case, it is intended primarily for popular consump­ du e to ignition of th e hydrogen. The sole exception find nothing here too advanced for his purpose and tion, the courage of the author and publishers is the 'Dixmude'. " There are several inaccuracies should also find it of great use and value. deserves the recognition of an extended review. in this. In the first place, the Zeppelin Company Turnin g over the pages of this new edition one Mr. Christopher Sprigg's name is not known as hav e not built 127 airships, but only 118, including canno t help being again struck by the uniformity th e "Graf Zeppelin," The author has forgotten an airship enthusiast, and this book is the more wit h which the different writers have succeeded in tha t although this ship is numbered L.Z.127, there welcome for coming from the pen of one who is not moulding themselves to the common end. It is were two gaps—between L.72 (the last war-time suspect on account of close association with lighter- impossible t o pick ou t one chapte r more tha n another airship, numbered L.Z.I 14) and the "Bodensee" than-ai r aircraft in the past, particularly as he for special praise. All are admirably lucid and (L.Z.120), and between the "Nordstern " (L.Z.121) shows tha t he has made a close stud y of th e subject. thoroughl y practical. There can seldom have been and the "Lo s Angeles" (L.Z.126)—so tha t 9 ships His attitude towards the ever-present contro­ a n "omnibus " volume in which an editor could in the sequence of numbering were never built. versy between the airship and the aeroplane, which mor e justifiably congratulate himself on the way his H e has forgotten also tha t L. 1 collapsed in the air seems likely to continue, despite much lip-service author s have carried out his intentions. in 1913, in somewhat similar circumstances to the to the theory of "roo m in the air for both," is made Owing to the second edition being merely a late r "Shenandoah" disaster, and killed all her clear in an introductory chapter, and elaborated in reprin t of the first the following small misprints crew, without catching fire. Actually, so far as the a final summary entitled "To-morrow." remain uncorrected: p. 15, for "4½ in. tucks " read presen t writer knows, only three Zeppelins (L.2, Th e book starts, after the introductory chapter L.10 and L.59) have caused fatalities by catching "fou r and a half tucks" ; p. 43, 5 lines from the alread y mentioned, with an adequate summary for fire. Mention of L.59 brings us to the fact that the end, for "Category B," read "Category C"; th e non-technical reader of the principles of lift, "ful l list of German Zeppelins and their fate" p . 51, for "Chapters V and VI," read "Chapters an d then goes on to describe in general terms the printe d in an Appendix from an article by Captain I V and V." design and construction of balloon and "pressure Erns t Lehmann is by no means reliable. L.2 does airships"—whic h excellent phrase the author T o those who are unfamiliar with it, the scope no t occur in his list a t all ; L.59 is shown as "sho t adopt s to cover the non-rigid and semi-rigid types of the book can, perhaps, best be indicated by down by enemy," which was not the case; while recapitulatin g the table of contents. Chapter I. which, as he points out, in some of their manifesta­ L.9 is given twice, as is also the first "Ersatz Th e Erection and Alignment of the Aeroplane tion s so resemble each other as to become almost Deutschland. " The only fully complete and reliable Structure . Chapter II. Controls, Supply Systems indistinguishable. This is all well done but when list the present writer has seen was published in an d Inspection before Flight. Chapter III. In­ th e structure of the rigid airship comes to be dealt th e American paper Automotive Industries of May, spection of Structure and Component Parts after with, the author is rather less happy. He classes 19, 1921. Overhaul . Chapter IV. Dismantling and Top rigid airships into two divisions—Zeppelin and British practice. This seems to bring R.100 and Overhau l of the Engine. Chapter V. Engine I t has been felt worth while to call attention to R.101 closer together than is justified. The mere Running-in after Top Overhaul, and Routine a few small blemishes in this book, because it is on omission of intermediate longitudinals and trans­ Inspection. Chapter VI. Inspection of Engine th e whole excellently well calculated to fulfil the verse frames hardly differentiates the former from Installatio n and Instruments after Overhaul. purpose for which it is designed. As a popular th e "Gra f Zeppelin" as much as is implied, whereas Chapte r VII . Workshop Manipulation and Testing exposition of the characteristics and possibilities of ther e were many features purely special to R.101. of Engine Materials and Parts. Chapter VIII. th e airship it can be thoroughly recommended. Th e Complete Overhaul and Subsequent Testing In a chapter dealing with the immediate \V. L. M.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1931

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off