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Training School Now Open

Training School Now Open THE Qualitair School of Air Main­ tenance, Britain's first purpose-built training school for the airline main­ Training School tenance industry has opened at Solihull, West Midlands. This multimillion project has been launched by Qualitair to combat the Now Open growing world shortage of aircraft engineers, which is expected to reach 100,000 by the end of the decade. The first course to get under way is a two-year BTec course in aeronautical The Qualitair Group, based in engineering for school-leavers, which Cambridge, has more than 20 years combines classroom theory, workshop international experience in the aviation practice and on-the-job experience. maintenance business, with a client list Next comes a distance learning which includes many of the world's course which will enable maintenance major airlines. technicians to qualify as licensed aircraft The group's main operating arm, engineers; this is expected to start early Qualitair Engineering Services (QES) in 1992. employs 300-plus specialist engineers This will be complemented by a and technicians working on contract for range of specialist residential courses, airlines and aviation companies all over both long and short term, which will be the world — from Cambridge to tailored to meet airlines' specific needs. Katmandu — and is the acknowledged The first teaching and administration market leader in this field. block is now in use, and planning Another subsidiary, Qualitair Infor­ consent has recently been obtained for mation Services (QIS) markets advanced the remaining development, including software and systems for maintenance who are qualified to sign off aircraft as 150 study bedrooms. planning and management, including fit to fly. QSAM occupies a 4-acre site on the the Constellation system which was Because of the complexity of modern campus of Solihull College of Tech­ pioneered by the world's largest com­ passenger aircraft, engineers are licensed nology, and represents a unique joint mercial aircraft maintenance centre, for each individual type; airlines and venture between industry and an educa­ HAECO in Hong Kong. manufacturers also have their own tional institution. approval systems. As airlines update Qualitair provides the aviation exper­ and extend their fleets, there is therefore Qualitair School of Air Mainten­ tise, employs the staff and is financing a constant need for staff with the ance, Tudor Grange, Solihull, West the project, while SCOT provides the appropriate training. Midlands. site and the links to the education system. Workshop spaces in the College's engineering department have also been converted to aviation use. Qualitair's director of training, Rodney Copping, said: "Although the recession and the Gulf War has led to a temporary downturn, airlines have to take a long- term view of their manpower needs. We are already talking to a number of airlines about the different ways in which we can satisfy their training requirements." The school is also expected to provide training support for the new B747 maintenance base planned for Birmingham International Airport in the mid 1990s. The Principal of SCOT, Colin Flint, said: "We at the College are very pleased to see the School of Air Maintenance open for business. The opportunity to create a significant interface between college and industry is now established and we look forward to its continuing success." Maintenance staff in the airline industry include both skilled technicians with craft skills and licensed engineers AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING — November 1991 25 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Training School Now Open

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 63 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1991

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb037178
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE Qualitair School of Air Main­ tenance, Britain's first purpose-built training school for the airline main­ Training School tenance industry has opened at Solihull, West Midlands. This multimillion project has been launched by Qualitair to combat the Now Open growing world shortage of aircraft engineers, which is expected to reach 100,000 by the end of the decade. The first course to get under way is a two-year BTec course in aeronautical The Qualitair Group, based in engineering for school-leavers, which Cambridge, has more than 20 years combines classroom theory, workshop international experience in the aviation practice and on-the-job experience. maintenance business, with a client list Next comes a distance learning which includes many of the world's course which will enable maintenance major airlines. technicians to qualify as licensed aircraft The group's main operating arm, engineers; this is expected to start early Qualitair Engineering Services (QES) in 1992. employs 300-plus specialist engineers This will be complemented by a and technicians working on contract for range of specialist residential courses, airlines and aviation companies all over both long and short term, which will be the world — from Cambridge to tailored to meet airlines' specific needs. Katmandu — and is the acknowledged The first teaching and administration market leader in this field. block is now in use, and planning Another subsidiary, Qualitair Infor­ consent has recently been obtained for mation Services (QIS) markets advanced the remaining development, including software and systems for maintenance who are qualified to sign off aircraft as 150 study bedrooms. planning and management, including fit to fly. QSAM occupies a 4-acre site on the the Constellation system which was Because of the complexity of modern campus of Solihull College of Tech­ pioneered by the world's largest com­ passenger aircraft, engineers are licensed nology, and represents a unique joint mercial aircraft maintenance centre, for each individual type; airlines and venture between industry and an educa­ HAECO in Hong Kong. manufacturers also have their own tional institution. approval systems. As airlines update Qualitair provides the aviation exper­ and extend their fleets, there is therefore Qualitair School of Air Mainten­ tise, employs the staff and is financing a constant need for staff with the ance, Tudor Grange, Solihull, West the project, while SCOT provides the appropriate training. Midlands. site and the links to the education system. Workshop spaces in the College's engineering department have also been converted to aviation use. Qualitair's director of training, Rodney Copping, said: "Although the recession and the Gulf War has led to a temporary downturn, airlines have to take a long- term view of their manpower needs. We are already talking to a number of airlines about the different ways in which we can satisfy their training requirements." The school is also expected to provide training support for the new B747 maintenance base planned for Birmingham International Airport in the mid 1990s. The Principal of SCOT, Colin Flint, said: "We at the College are very pleased to see the School of Air Maintenance open for business. The opportunity to create a significant interface between college and industry is now established and we look forward to its continuing success." Maintenance staff in the airline industry include both skilled technicians with craft skills and licensed engineers AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING — November 1991 25

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1991

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