Training Ground Engineers

Training Ground Engineers March, 1932 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 77 The College of Aeronautical Engineering Provides a Welcome Addition to Facilities T will be within the memory of readers of AIR­ CRAFT ENGINEEKING that in its first number, publishe d in April, 1929, appeared the first of a series of articles entitled " A Course for Ground Engineers, " which on its completion fifteen months late r was republished in book form as "Th e Care an d Maintenanc e of Aircraft." This book, th e second edition of which is rapidly approaching the state when a third edition will be necessary owing to th e continued demand, was widely acclaimed as the only source from which a prospective ground engineer could obtain the necessary theoretical knowledge t o enable him to sit for the Air Ministry examination s to qualify him for holding a licence. In this way, half his needs were satisfied. Practica l Training Bu t there still remained the difficulty that for practica l experience a candidate was dependent on obtaining a position in some aircraft building or operating firm; which, as we can testify from application s for advice received from time to time in the offices of this paper, was not by an y means alway s easy to arrange. I t was, therefore, with considerable satisfaction tha t the information was received tha t th e "College of Aeronautical Engineering" had been established a t 102, Sydney Street, Chelsea, S.W.3, to provide satisfying the shop instructor in regard to his t o that effect. Before being admitted to this facilities for the training of ground engineers in ability , workmanship and application to work Section of the training, the student will be required th e practical side of their work. durin g the term, also passing the terminal test set t o pass a qualifying examination in Mathematics. Th e new college, which is ru n in conjunction with b y the Board of Examiners:— 4.—He must have submitted satisfactory home­ th e already well-known Automobile Engineering Fitting ; Aero-Engine Fitting ; Machine Shop ; work during the period of training. Trainin g College and the Brooklands School of Materials (Testing of); Engine Testing; Car­ Flying, has submitted its syllabus to the Aero­ burettors ; Pattern Shop; Foundry Work; A.I.D . Examinations nautica l Inspection Directorate of the Air Ministry, Oxy-Acetylene Welding; Electrical Equipment; 5.—He must pass the Examinations held by the which is, i t is understood, entirely satisfied with it. Timbers ; Fabrics; Dope Shop; Rigging, etc.; Director of Aeronautical Inspection (Air Ministry) Th e College awards a diploma a t the end of the Instrument s and Compasses; Daily Inspections; for Categories A an d C, Ground Engineers' Licences. course, which extends over two and a half years Overhaul s for Certificate of Airworthiness; Final th e first half being spent at Chelsea and the Student s who complete their training prior to Inspection for Certificate of Airworthiness; remainder at Brooklands. th e ago of 21 years take these examinations while Drawin g Office. a t the College, their licences being granted upon Diplom a Requirements attainin g the age of 21 years. Fina l Tests Th e Diploma is the summarised result of the 6.—His general conduct and punctuality must He must also satisfactorily pass, bot h with regard termina l examinations held during the student's hav e been satisfactory, and these will be recorded on t o workmanship and time, a series of final tests course a t the College and his Instructor's reports as th e Diploma. before being granted the Diploma. t o his ability and application during the whole 3.—He must have passed in the following Th e Student ma y be awarde d a Grade "A, " "B " period of his training. theoretica l subjects, comprising Section 2 of the or "C " Diploma according to the standard of work Th e Diploma will only be awarded if the student Diploma: — attained . The grading is based on the aggregate ha s fulfilled the following conditions:— Aero-Engines ; Theory of Flight; Electricity mark s gained in the Shop Reports and in the 1.—He must have attended the College and an d Magnetism; Materials of Construction; Terminal examinations plus the records attained College aerodrome for a minimum period of two Shop Calculations; Navigation an d Meteorology; unde r Sections 4, 5 and 6 as follows:— an d a half years. Aerodrome Management. Grade A.—Honours in both Section 1 and 2.—He must have passed through each of the Th e Diplomas of Students passing the Ad­ Section 2, plus Air Ministry Licences A an d C, with following shops, comprisin g Section 1 of th e Diploma, vanced Technical Theory receive an endorsement a n Endorsement if Advanced Technical Theory is covered under Section 2. Grade D.—Honours in Section 1 an d 1st or 2nd Class Pass in Section 2, plus Air Ministry Licences A and C, or 1st Class Pass in both Section 1 and Section 2, plus Air Ministry Licences A an d C. Grade C.—2nd Class Pass in both Section 1 an d Section 2, plus Air Ministry Licences A and C. I n grading a student's Diploma, great importance is attached to his general adaptability, speed and applicatio n to work, and the grade of Diploma grante d may be materially affected by these, even thoug h all other examinations have been satis­ factorily passed. Th e Syllabus Th e details of the instruction given under each subject in which a student is required to pass are given in a booklet issued by the College. These show tha t the practical side of th e work is thorough­ ly well covered an d tha t on completion of th e course, student s should be fully qualified to carry out over­ hauls and repair work. Ther e is also a comprehensive syllabus of theor­ etical teaching which is given side-by-side with the practical work. Of 20 students who were exa­ mined by the Air Ministry a t the end of the first (probationary) term in December, 1931, 18 passed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Training Ground Engineers

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 4 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1932

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029525
Publisher site
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Abstract

March, 1932 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 77 The College of Aeronautical Engineering Provides a Welcome Addition to Facilities T will be within the memory of readers of AIR­ CRAFT ENGINEEKING that in its first number, publishe d in April, 1929, appeared the first of a series of articles entitled " A Course for Ground Engineers, " which on its completion fifteen months late r was republished in book form as "Th e Care an d Maintenanc e of Aircraft." This book, th e second edition of which is rapidly approaching the state when a third edition will be necessary owing to th e continued demand, was widely acclaimed as the only source from which a prospective ground engineer could obtain the necessary theoretical knowledge t o enable him to sit for the Air Ministry examination s to qualify him for holding a licence. In this way, half his needs were satisfied. Practica l Training Bu t there still remained the difficulty that for practica l experience a candidate was dependent on obtaining a position in some aircraft building or operating firm; which, as we can testify from application s for advice received from time to time in the offices of this paper, was not by an y means alway s easy to arrange. I t was, therefore, with considerable satisfaction tha t the information was received tha t th e "College of Aeronautical Engineering" had been established a t 102, Sydney Street, Chelsea, S.W.3, to provide satisfying the shop instructor in regard to his t o that effect. Before being admitted to this facilities for the training of ground engineers in ability , workmanship and application to work Section of the training, the student will be required th e practical side of their work. durin g the term, also passing the terminal test set t o pass a qualifying examination in Mathematics. Th e new college, which is ru n in conjunction with b y the Board of Examiners:— 4.—He must have submitted satisfactory home­ th e already well-known Automobile Engineering Fitting ; Aero-Engine Fitting ; Machine Shop ; work during the period of training. Trainin g College and the Brooklands School of Materials (Testing of); Engine Testing; Car­ Flying, has submitted its syllabus to the Aero­ burettors ; Pattern Shop; Foundry Work; A.I.D . Examinations nautica l Inspection Directorate of the Air Ministry, Oxy-Acetylene Welding; Electrical Equipment; 5.—He must pass the Examinations held by the which is, i t is understood, entirely satisfied with it. Timbers ; Fabrics; Dope Shop; Rigging, etc.; Director of Aeronautical Inspection (Air Ministry) Th e College awards a diploma a t the end of the Instrument s and Compasses; Daily Inspections; for Categories A an d C, Ground Engineers' Licences. course, which extends over two and a half years Overhaul s for Certificate of Airworthiness; Final th e first half being spent at Chelsea and the Student s who complete their training prior to Inspection for Certificate of Airworthiness; remainder at Brooklands. th e ago of 21 years take these examinations while Drawin g Office. a t the College, their licences being granted upon Diplom a Requirements attainin g the age of 21 years. Fina l Tests Th e Diploma is the summarised result of the 6.—His general conduct and punctuality must He must also satisfactorily pass, bot h with regard termina l examinations held during the student's hav e been satisfactory, and these will be recorded on t o workmanship and time, a series of final tests course a t the College and his Instructor's reports as th e Diploma. before being granted the Diploma. t o his ability and application during the whole 3.—He must have passed in the following Th e Student ma y be awarde d a Grade "A, " "B " period of his training. theoretica l subjects, comprising Section 2 of the or "C " Diploma according to the standard of work Th e Diploma will only be awarded if the student Diploma: — attained . The grading is based on the aggregate ha s fulfilled the following conditions:— Aero-Engines ; Theory of Flight; Electricity mark s gained in the Shop Reports and in the 1.—He must have attended the College and an d Magnetism; Materials of Construction; Terminal examinations plus the records attained College aerodrome for a minimum period of two Shop Calculations; Navigation an d Meteorology; unde r Sections 4, 5 and 6 as follows:— an d a half years. Aerodrome Management. Grade A.—Honours in both Section 1 and 2.—He must have passed through each of the Th e Diplomas of Students passing the Ad­ Section 2, plus Air Ministry Licences A an d C, with following shops, comprisin g Section 1 of th e Diploma, vanced Technical Theory receive an endorsement a n Endorsement if Advanced Technical Theory is covered under Section 2. Grade D.—Honours in Section 1 an d 1st or 2nd Class Pass in Section 2, plus Air Ministry Licences A and C, or 1st Class Pass in both Section 1 and Section 2, plus Air Ministry Licences A an d C. Grade C.—2nd Class Pass in both Section 1 an d Section 2, plus Air Ministry Licences A and C. I n grading a student's Diploma, great importance is attached to his general adaptability, speed and applicatio n to work, and the grade of Diploma grante d may be materially affected by these, even thoug h all other examinations have been satis­ factorily passed. Th e Syllabus Th e details of the instruction given under each subject in which a student is required to pass are given in a booklet issued by the College. These show tha t the practical side of th e work is thorough­ ly well covered an d tha t on completion of th e course, student s should be fully qualified to carry out over­ hauls and repair work. Ther e is also a comprehensive syllabus of theor­ etical teaching which is given side-by-side with the practical work. Of 20 students who were exa­ mined by the Air Ministry a t the end of the first (probationary) term in December, 1931, 18 passed.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1932

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