Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Toxic interaction theory: one reason why African Caribbean people are over‐represented in psychiatric services and potential solutions

Toxic interaction theory: one reason why African Caribbean people are over‐represented in... Purpose – The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for understanding how, even in the absence of identifiable racist behaviours by white people and predominantly white institutions, African Caribbean people can suffer detriment to their mental health due to toxicity in interactions. Design/methodology/approach – This paper was developed through a desktop review of literature that analyses the factors that cause the sustained variation in experience and outcome in mental health for people from African Caribbean backgrounds. Findings – Prior experiences of personalised racism (interpersonal and institutional) and an awareness of non‐personalised racism in society creates conditions which mean that African Caribbean people experience toxicity in their dealings with white people and white institutions, including mental health services. This is detrimental to service user outcomes. Originality/value – The paper provides a language for the process that leads to negative outcomes for African Caribbean people in mental health services resulting from interactions with white people or white institutions even in the absence of racism or racist events directed at them. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care Emerald Publishing

Toxic interaction theory: one reason why African Caribbean people are over‐represented in psychiatric services and potential solutions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/toxic-interaction-theory-one-reason-why-african-caribbean-people-are-00joeqVwRP
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1757-0980
DOI
10.1108/17570981211286741
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for understanding how, even in the absence of identifiable racist behaviours by white people and predominantly white institutions, African Caribbean people can suffer detriment to their mental health due to toxicity in interactions. Design/methodology/approach – This paper was developed through a desktop review of literature that analyses the factors that cause the sustained variation in experience and outcome in mental health for people from African Caribbean backgrounds. Findings – Prior experiences of personalised racism (interpersonal and institutional) and an awareness of non‐personalised racism in society creates conditions which mean that African Caribbean people experience toxicity in their dealings with white people and white institutions, including mental health services. This is detrimental to service user outcomes. Originality/value – The paper provides a language for the process that leads to negative outcomes for African Caribbean people in mental health services resulting from interactions with white people or white institutions even in the absence of racism or racist events directed at them.

Journal

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social CareEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 23, 2012

Keywords: Race; Mental health; Ethnicity; Toxic interactions; BME groups; Personal health; Ethnic groups; Mental health services

References