Total Quality Management in Services Part 1: Understanding and Classifying Services

Total Quality Management in Services Part 1: Understanding and Classifying Services Reviews the literature dealing with the nature and characteristics of service and applies it to 30 selected services with the objective of synthesizing a classification scheme to recognize operational similarities between services. This has the purpose of enabling learning by comparison of services which would normally be thought of as being different, and also to enable examination of service quality in the other two articles completing the series. Some of the reasons given for the growth of services are found to be the provision of new services, the possibilities created by new technology, the development of producer services and introduction and emphasis of services to differentiate and augment goods products. Given the resultant diversity of service the Standard Industrial Classification is a poor indicator of service content. In what ways should service be studied? One view is that study should be unified and theories developed which are capable of embracing both goods and services. A second view is that distinctions need to be studied to avoid any assumption that theories and approaches developed in a manufactured goods context automatically can be applied to services. In contrast to both of these, what actually happens in many services is that they are often developed and staffed by people who have little direct experience of, and have no accessible means of building on, the successful approaches taken by other services. Uses several of the theoretical and empirical ways in which services have been categorized to classify the range of services. Resolves subjective assessment of labour intensity, contact, interaction, tailoring, intangibility, and recipient into five groups –personal, shop, professional, mass and factory services – which partially confirms but also extends earlier classification schemes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management Emerald Publishing

Total Quality Management in Services Part 1: Understanding and Classifying Services

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/total-quality-management-in-services-part-1-understanding-and-hp6yQwK3h1
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0265-671X
DOI
10.1108/02656719410056459
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews the literature dealing with the nature and characteristics of service and applies it to 30 selected services with the objective of synthesizing a classification scheme to recognize operational similarities between services. This has the purpose of enabling learning by comparison of services which would normally be thought of as being different, and also to enable examination of service quality in the other two articles completing the series. Some of the reasons given for the growth of services are found to be the provision of new services, the possibilities created by new technology, the development of producer services and introduction and emphasis of services to differentiate and augment goods products. Given the resultant diversity of service the Standard Industrial Classification is a poor indicator of service content. In what ways should service be studied? One view is that study should be unified and theories developed which are capable of embracing both goods and services. A second view is that distinctions need to be studied to avoid any assumption that theories and approaches developed in a manufactured goods context automatically can be applied to services. In contrast to both of these, what actually happens in many services is that they are often developed and staffed by people who have little direct experience of, and have no accessible means of building on, the successful approaches taken by other services. Uses several of the theoretical and empirical ways in which services have been categorized to classify the range of services. Resolves subjective assessment of labour intensity, contact, interaction, tailoring, intangibility, and recipient into five groups –personal, shop, professional, mass and factory services – which partially confirms but also extends earlier classification schemes.

Journal

International Journal of Quality & Reliability ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1994

Keywords: Classification; Customers; Intangibility; Mass services; Professional service firms; Research; Service industries; TQM

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off