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Tools for the Workshop

Tools for the Workshop A Monthly Selection of Recent Equipment and New Methods Surface Finish A New Blow Gun In the majority of grinding machines there is By applying the principles of the convergent- a very considerable volume of swarf, which is divergent nozzle to their new shop blow gun The being continuously circulated by the coolant Hymatic Engineering Co. Ltd. of Redditch, between the wheel and the work. To meet this Worcs. has produced a compact light-weight very general condition, the Scrivener Clarifier instrument that is capable of delivering an air jet shown by FIG. 3 has been designed, its purpose of 2,000 ft./sec. from the standard shop line being the automatic and continuous removal pressure of 100 lb./sq. in. Accessories available from the coolant of the ferrous swarf and broken are 4 ft. 6 in. and 6 ft. 0 in. lengths of oil-resistant abrasive grit deposited therein by the action of hose and adapter connexions for attachment to the grinding wheel. FIG. 4 is a series of micro- existing hose. photographs showing the material automatically removed by this means from the coolant of New Cincinnati Millers grinding machines working upon (a) hardened The range of Cincinnati millers has recently steel work, (b) stainless steel, and (c) grey cast- been augmented by the No. 2 MI, a 5-h.p. machine iron. Very little examination is needed to show which is available as a plain or universal miller the large proportion of broken abrasive which is (FIGS. 1 and 2). The speed and feed ratios are also removed along with the ferrous swarf, some exceptionally wide 60 : 1 (25 to 1,500 r.p.m.) and of this grit being shown in both (a) and (b) 120 : 1 respectively. The design of the whole encircled by a ring to facilitate identification. The machine is very up to date and includes many of effect which this material has upon surface finish the latest devices. A full illustrated specification if not continuously removed can be judged when is available from the manufacturers, Cincinnati it is mentioned that the length of the largest of Milling Machines Ltd., Tyburn, Birmingham. the broken grains in photograph (6) is about 0∙015 in. The point needs no stressing therefore that it is impossible to obtain finishes in the order of 4 or 5 micro-inches while there is any quantity of such material being passed between wheel and work. When working on production runs, the amount of swarf deposited in the tank can be calculated fairly closely. As an example, in the case of a batch of centreless ground work consist­ ing of one hundred steel tubes 2¾ in. dia. by 30 in. long, with a varying stock removal amounting in some cases to as much as 0∙022 in., the amount of grinding swarf removed from the coolant by the clarifier was 116 lb. The action of the clarifier can be seen from FIG. 1, where it will be seen that it consists of a comparatively small tank to which the used coolant from the grinding or honing machine is fed through a restricted channel past a rotating aluminium disk "A", which carries a series of very powerful magnets "B". The coolant then passes into the main chamber of the clarifier, in which is placed a large wire basket surrounded with felt. Suspended in this basket is the distribu­ tor pump. The aluminium disk revolves slowly, and any ferrous matter as well as grit contained in the used coolant passing through this restricted channel is collected by the magnets and brought round by the revolving disk to a position where the wiper arms "C " remove these particles, and deposit them in a separate discharge channel "D" , thence to a bucket placed to receive this sludge. The cleaned coolant is then pumped back to the machine. The small electric motor which serves to drive the disk and wiper arms is shown by "E" . December 1946 435 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Tools for the Workshop

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 18 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1946

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031454
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Monthly Selection of Recent Equipment and New Methods Surface Finish A New Blow Gun In the majority of grinding machines there is By applying the principles of the convergent- a very considerable volume of swarf, which is divergent nozzle to their new shop blow gun The being continuously circulated by the coolant Hymatic Engineering Co. Ltd. of Redditch, between the wheel and the work. To meet this Worcs. has produced a compact light-weight very general condition, the Scrivener Clarifier instrument that is capable of delivering an air jet shown by FIG. 3 has been designed, its purpose of 2,000 ft./sec. from the standard shop line being the automatic and continuous removal pressure of 100 lb./sq. in. Accessories available from the coolant of the ferrous swarf and broken are 4 ft. 6 in. and 6 ft. 0 in. lengths of oil-resistant abrasive grit deposited therein by the action of hose and adapter connexions for attachment to the grinding wheel. FIG. 4 is a series of micro- existing hose. photographs showing the material automatically removed by this means from the coolant of New Cincinnati Millers grinding machines working upon (a) hardened The range of Cincinnati millers has recently steel work, (b) stainless steel, and (c) grey cast- been augmented by the No. 2 MI, a 5-h.p. machine iron. Very little examination is needed to show which is available as a plain or universal miller the large proportion of broken abrasive which is (FIGS. 1 and 2). The speed and feed ratios are also removed along with the ferrous swarf, some exceptionally wide 60 : 1 (25 to 1,500 r.p.m.) and of this grit being shown in both (a) and (b) 120 : 1 respectively. The design of the whole encircled by a ring to facilitate identification. The machine is very up to date and includes many of effect which this material has upon surface finish the latest devices. A full illustrated specification if not continuously removed can be judged when is available from the manufacturers, Cincinnati it is mentioned that the length of the largest of Milling Machines Ltd., Tyburn, Birmingham. the broken grains in photograph (6) is about 0∙015 in. The point needs no stressing therefore that it is impossible to obtain finishes in the order of 4 or 5 micro-inches while there is any quantity of such material being passed between wheel and work. When working on production runs, the amount of swarf deposited in the tank can be calculated fairly closely. As an example, in the case of a batch of centreless ground work consist­ ing of one hundred steel tubes 2¾ in. dia. by 30 in. long, with a varying stock removal amounting in some cases to as much as 0∙022 in., the amount of grinding swarf removed from the coolant by the clarifier was 116 lb. The action of the clarifier can be seen from FIG. 1, where it will be seen that it consists of a comparatively small tank to which the used coolant from the grinding or honing machine is fed through a restricted channel past a rotating aluminium disk "A", which carries a series of very powerful magnets "B". The coolant then passes into the main chamber of the clarifier, in which is placed a large wire basket surrounded with felt. Suspended in this basket is the distribu­ tor pump. The aluminium disk revolves slowly, and any ferrous matter as well as grit contained in the used coolant passing through this restricted channel is collected by the magnets and brought round by the revolving disk to a position where the wiper arms "C " remove these particles, and deposit them in a separate discharge channel "D" , thence to a bucket placed to receive this sludge. The cleaned coolant is then pumped back to the machine. The small electric motor which serves to drive the disk and wiper arms is shown by "E" . December 1946 435

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1946

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