Tools for the Workshop

Tools for the Workshop A Selection of Equipment of Use in the Production and Maintenance of Aircraft and Components SOM E STANDAR D TYPES O F BODSO N ENDOSCOPES Bodson Endoscopes The visual examination of the interior of hollow Attachments that can be Furnished parts calls for an instrument which will illuminate the Type Diameter Maximum part being inspected and advance the image of it Length Fixed Removable towards the eye. Such an instrument is the endoscope, M.D.F. originally used in medical practice and now applied 03·10T 5mm 5 100mm M.D.F. to industry. 04·14T 7mm 5 140mm M.D.R. 05·40 5mm 5 400mm is actuated by pulling the hydraulic control valve P. W. Allen & Co. Ltd. have recently been appointed A.M.D.R. 06·75 6mm 5 750mm A.M.D.R. lever. The sprocket is pulled round the sprocket wheel, sole agents in Great Britain for J. Bodson et Fils, 03·80 8mm 800mm A.M.D.R. 10·100 10mm 1m the swinging head rotates, and the tube is drawn over 14 Rue Denis-Papin, Puteaux (Seine), France, who 12·35 C 12mm 350mm manufacture a range of endoscopes for use in the the mandrel. At the end of the bend, a second hydraulic A.M.D.F.I. 13·160* 13mm 1m 600 A.M.D.F.I. control valve actuates the retraction ram, which pulls inspection of the inside of tubes, vessels, etc. They are 16·320* 16mm 3m 200 A.M.D.F.I. the mandrel down the tube away from the bend. The optical instruments fitted with electric bulbs, and are 19·400* 19mm 4m A.M.D.F.I. 22·500* 22mm 5m clamp and pressure die are then wound back to allow contained in a rigid tube whose length and diameter A.M.D.F.I. 30·700* 30mm 7m the tube to be taken out. The movement of the first varies according to the application for which it is valve in the opposite direction actuates the return required. * : Dismountable Apparatus. R: Device for rearward vision. ram, which pulls the chain back to the starting posi­ Cavities of diameter as small as 6 mm. (·236 in.) A : Annular Device. F: Device for viewing the bottom. tion, returning the swinging head. can be examined though not to any great depth, since M : Prism device for vision I: Prism device wit h variable These machines can be supplied to bend any size experience has shown that for instruments of small at a 60 deg. angle. inclination. of steam pipe or similar material up to 12 in. nominal diameter the length should not be more than 100 to D : Prism device for vision bore to radii in accordance with the British Standards 125 times the diameter. At greater lengths the re­ at a 90 deg, angle. specifications. flection of light on the lens surfaces and the absorption of light due to the increasing thickness of the lenses prevent a clear image being obtained. However, tubes of 30 mm. (1·18 in.) diameter, Wire Twister Bearing Pullers for inspecting cavities up to 300 and 400 mm. (11·8 A tool which eliminates the twisting of wire by and 15·7 in.) in diameter, may be as long as 6 or 7 A new design for bearing pullers has been produced hand, and incorporates the functions of pliers and meters (19½ to 23 ft.) Instruments of this length are by E. F. Allchin & Co. Ltd. of 137 High Street, Aston, cutters, is now being manufactured in this country Birmingham. Made of chrome alloy steel, drop- supplied with tapered joints so that they can be dis­ by Douglas Kane Associates, 55 Pall Mall, London, forged and hardened, the pullers are adjustable to mantled, and are graduated so that defects may be SW1, the sole concessionaires for the Robinson Wire the required diameter by movement of the arms along located. Twister, an American design. The tool operates as the cross beam. The claws are broad and thin, to There can be slight magnification of the image, follows: locking wire is threaded through the ap­ enable them to be inserted behind a bearing when space depending on the distance between the objective and propriate hole, the two ends are gripped in the jaws is limited. When load has been applied to the claws the surface to be examined. If the objective is from of the twister and locked by sliding down the centre they cannot slip. The puller arms are reversible to ⅜ to ½ in. from the surface the magnification may be sleeve while the handles are squeezed. The central enable the tools to be used for external pulling and from 3 to 4 times; at 1¼ in. to 1½ in. the enlargement spindle is then pulled, causing the tool to spin on its internal extraction. is 2 times. The image is natural size when the objective own axis. The extent of the twist is controlled by the is 2¾ t o 3¼ in. from the surface. Above these distances Three models are claimed by the makers to be the amount of spin. Squeezing the handles releases the the image is reduced in size. largest capacity and heaviest duty two- and three- wire, which can be cut by side cutters in the head of Various types of instrument are made to permit the arm pullers offered as standard production tools. the tool. examination of the entire internal circumference or Model 20/5 has a capacity of up to 30 in. and a depth The wire twister is available in 3 sizes: 9 in., 10 in. of part of the circumference of circular vessels. View­ of grip adjustable from 16 in. to 27½ in. The 11/1 and 12 in. The makers claim that its light construc­ ing at an angle of 60 deg. or 90 deg. from the line of and the 11/2 models are each produced in two ver­ tion and good balance give easy one-hand operation. sions, one mechanical, the other hydraulic. The 11/1 sight is accomplished by means of a prism which It has a rust resistant finish, an oil-tempered plier can take bearings up to 20½ in. and the 11/2 bearings reflects the light rays in the required direction. An head and high frequency hardened cutter. The spiral up to 25½ in. Both have a grip depth of 8 in., and adapter can be fitted to the tube for inspection of the operates in a permanent bronze bearing. bottom of a vessel. For examining large vessels with additional arms can be supplied to give a grip depth only a small aperture, a hinged tube is used. This up to 19 in. brings an additional lamp nearer to the wall to be Tube Bending Machine inspected, so that it is adequately lit. An instrument with a rotating prism makes it possible to vary the Chamberlain Industries Ltd, of Staffa Works, angle of inspection. In some of these rotation of the Leyton, London, E.10 have recently completed a prism can be done during observation, while in others new design of tube bending machine, manufactured the prism is inclined to the desired angle before in­ under contract to their clients' requirements. The serting the tube into the cavity. machine is capable of 180 deg. bends in tubes up to 3 in. nominal bore and radii in accordance with British Standards. The tubes are bent cold and un­ loaded. The bending time is 25 seconds. The machine consists of a fabricated base made from rolled steel sections and boiler plate welded together. A vertical shaft is mounted at the front end, in a roller bearing at the top and a ball bearing at the bottom, and the swinging head is keyed to the top and bottom of this shaft, which is rotated by a triplex sprocket wheel mounted on it between the bearings. The sprocket is moved by a chain and a high pressure hydraulic ram. Also mounted on the front end of the main frame is a pressure die to take the reaction of the straight part of the tube during bending. The free end of the driving chain is attached to a smaller ram which returns the swinging head under no load after bending. The hydraulic system is fed by a power pack consisting of a swashplate pump with a maximum delivery pressure of 5,000 lb./sq. in. driven by an electric motor and flexible coupling. The sequence of operations during bending is first to push the tube over the mandrel and to wind the clamp on the swinging head to hold it against the centre former. The pressure die is then wound into the same position. The power pack is started by the push button at the control position. The main ram Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Tools for the Workshop

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 27 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
D.O.I.
10.1108/eb032628
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Abstract

A Selection of Equipment of Use in the Production and Maintenance of Aircraft and Components SOM E STANDAR D TYPES O F BODSO N ENDOSCOPES Bodson Endoscopes The visual examination of the interior of hollow Attachments that can be Furnished parts calls for an instrument which will illuminate the Type Diameter Maximum part being inspected and advance the image of it Length Fixed Removable towards the eye. Such an instrument is the endoscope, M.D.F. originally used in medical practice and now applied 03·10T 5mm 5 100mm M.D.F. to industry. 04·14T 7mm 5 140mm M.D.R. 05·40 5mm 5 400mm is actuated by pulling the hydraulic control valve P. W. Allen & Co. Ltd. have recently been appointed A.M.D.R. 06·75 6mm 5 750mm A.M.D.R. lever. The sprocket is pulled round the sprocket wheel, sole agents in Great Britain for J. Bodson et Fils, 03·80 8mm 800mm A.M.D.R. 10·100 10mm 1m the swinging head rotates, and the tube is drawn over 14 Rue Denis-Papin, Puteaux (Seine), France, who 12·35 C 12mm 350mm manufacture a range of endoscopes for use in the the mandrel. At the end of the bend, a second hydraulic A.M.D.F.I. 13·160* 13mm 1m 600 A.M.D.F.I. control valve actuates the retraction ram, which pulls inspection of the inside of tubes, vessels, etc. They are 16·320* 16mm 3m 200 A.M.D.F.I. the mandrel down the tube away from the bend. The optical instruments fitted with electric bulbs, and are 19·400* 19mm 4m A.M.D.F.I. 22·500* 22mm 5m clamp and pressure die are then wound back to allow contained in a rigid tube whose length and diameter A.M.D.F.I. 30·700* 30mm 7m the tube to be taken out. The movement of the first varies according to the application for which it is valve in the opposite direction actuates the return required. * : Dismountable Apparatus. R: Device for rearward vision. ram, which pulls the chain back to the starting posi­ Cavities of diameter as small as 6 mm. (·236 in.) A : Annular Device. F: Device for viewing the bottom. tion, returning the swinging head. can be examined though not to any great depth, since M : Prism device for vision I: Prism device wit h variable These machines can be supplied to bend any size experience has shown that for instruments of small at a 60 deg. angle. inclination. of steam pipe or similar material up to 12 in. nominal diameter the length should not be more than 100 to D : Prism device for vision bore to radii in accordance with the British Standards 125 times the diameter. At greater lengths the re­ at a 90 deg, angle. specifications. flection of light on the lens surfaces and the absorption of light due to the increasing thickness of the lenses prevent a clear image being obtained. However, tubes of 30 mm. (1·18 in.) diameter, Wire Twister Bearing Pullers for inspecting cavities up to 300 and 400 mm. (11·8 A tool which eliminates the twisting of wire by and 15·7 in.) in diameter, may be as long as 6 or 7 A new design for bearing pullers has been produced hand, and incorporates the functions of pliers and meters (19½ to 23 ft.) Instruments of this length are by E. F. Allchin & Co. Ltd. of 137 High Street, Aston, cutters, is now being manufactured in this country Birmingham. Made of chrome alloy steel, drop- supplied with tapered joints so that they can be dis­ by Douglas Kane Associates, 55 Pall Mall, London, forged and hardened, the pullers are adjustable to mantled, and are graduated so that defects may be SW1, the sole concessionaires for the Robinson Wire the required diameter by movement of the arms along located. Twister, an American design. The tool operates as the cross beam. The claws are broad and thin, to There can be slight magnification of the image, follows: locking wire is threaded through the ap­ enable them to be inserted behind a bearing when space depending on the distance between the objective and propriate hole, the two ends are gripped in the jaws is limited. When load has been applied to the claws the surface to be examined. If the objective is from of the twister and locked by sliding down the centre they cannot slip. The puller arms are reversible to ⅜ to ½ in. from the surface the magnification may be sleeve while the handles are squeezed. The central enable the tools to be used for external pulling and from 3 to 4 times; at 1¼ in. to 1½ in. the enlargement spindle is then pulled, causing the tool to spin on its internal extraction. is 2 times. The image is natural size when the objective own axis. The extent of the twist is controlled by the is 2¾ t o 3¼ in. from the surface. Above these distances Three models are claimed by the makers to be the amount of spin. Squeezing the handles releases the the image is reduced in size. largest capacity and heaviest duty two- and three- wire, which can be cut by side cutters in the head of Various types of instrument are made to permit the arm pullers offered as standard production tools. the tool. examination of the entire internal circumference or Model 20/5 has a capacity of up to 30 in. and a depth The wire twister is available in 3 sizes: 9 in., 10 in. of part of the circumference of circular vessels. View­ of grip adjustable from 16 in. to 27½ in. The 11/1 and 12 in. The makers claim that its light construc­ ing at an angle of 60 deg. or 90 deg. from the line of and the 11/2 models are each produced in two ver­ tion and good balance give easy one-hand operation. sions, one mechanical, the other hydraulic. The 11/1 sight is accomplished by means of a prism which It has a rust resistant finish, an oil-tempered plier can take bearings up to 20½ in. and the 11/2 bearings reflects the light rays in the required direction. An head and high frequency hardened cutter. The spiral up to 25½ in. Both have a grip depth of 8 in., and adapter can be fitted to the tube for inspection of the operates in a permanent bronze bearing. bottom of a vessel. For examining large vessels with additional arms can be supplied to give a grip depth only a small aperture, a hinged tube is used. This up to 19 in. brings an additional lamp nearer to the wall to be Tube Bending Machine inspected, so that it is adequately lit. An instrument with a rotating prism makes it possible to vary the Chamberlain Industries Ltd, of Staffa Works, angle of inspection. In some of these rotation of the Leyton, London, E.10 have recently completed a prism can be done during observation, while in others new design of tube bending machine, manufactured the prism is inclined to the desired angle before in­ under contract to their clients' requirements. The serting the tube into the cavity. machine is capable of 180 deg. bends in tubes up to 3 in. nominal bore and radii in accordance with British Standards. The tubes are bent cold and un­ loaded. The bending time is 25 seconds. The machine consists of a fabricated base made from rolled steel sections and boiler plate welded together. A vertical shaft is mounted at the front end, in a roller bearing at the top and a ball bearing at the bottom, and the swinging head is keyed to the top and bottom of this shaft, which is rotated by a triplex sprocket wheel mounted on it between the bearings. The sprocket is moved by a chain and a high pressure hydraulic ram. Also mounted on the front end of the main frame is a pressure die to take the reaction of the straight part of the tube during bending. The free end of the driving chain is attached to a smaller ram which returns the swinging head under no load after bending. The hydraulic system is fed by a power pack consisting of a swashplate pump with a maximum delivery pressure of 5,000 lb./sq. in. driven by an electric motor and flexible coupling. The sequence of operations during bending is first to push the tube over the mandrel and to wind the clamp on the swinging head to hold it against the centre former. The pressure die is then wound into the same position. The power pack is started by the push button at the control position. The main ram Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1955

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