Tools for the Workshop

Tools for the Workshop A Monthly Selection of Recent Equipment and New Methods would close them at approximately twice the rate of that on the flanks. The Churchill Machine Tool Co. Ltd. points out that it has achieved this efficiency as a result of forty years' experience in designing and building precision grinders. It is the "Pulcrush" equipment incorporated in the machine that relieves the machine ways and the grinding spindle bearings of crushing loads. Paint Hardening Equipment for High-Speed Aeroplanes The Gloster Meteor which regained the air speed record for Great Britain was processed in the modern paint shop of the Gloster Aircraft Co. The coatings of fillers and paints were stoved in infra-red electric lamp tunnels: the wings, fuselage and nose units were all stoved in equipment supplied by the Metropolitan- Vickers Electrical Co. Ltd. One plant being used for the wings and another for the fuselage and smaller components. The wing tunnel (FIG. 3) is 20 ft. x 9 ft. x 13 ft. of the wing or fuselage is to be stoved. Mounted on rubber-tyred wheels these mobile plants constitute a most useful addition to the main plants. Tool Marking Equipment Utilizing Old Fluorescent Tubes We have recently received details of some of the The Glenn L. Martin Company, Baltimore, Mary­ Pryor marking equipment, which includes founts of land, arc using burned-out fluorescent light tubes to. interchangeable steel type, each packed in a fitted mould plastic rods for a multitude of purposes. This oak case complete with a hand holder of patented idea was suggested by a Martin employee who found design (FIG. 1). The type packs including such hand the demand for plastic rods to be used as tool handles, holders arc in sizes 1/16 in., 3/32 in. and ⅛ in. ; they contain stiffeners, etc., far in excess of the equipment available 100 pieces of type in a selected variety of figures and to mould them. (FIG. 5) letters and 12 spacing pieces, together with a pair of In practice, one end of the burned-out tube is cut off tweezers. An Allen key for operating the patent type- and the tube itself is filled with a liquid Catabond or locking device which is a feature of the holders is Catavar thermo-setting resin and then placed in an provided with each set. Both the holders and type oven for curing. The cured plastic, still in the tube, is have a satin nickel finish. removed from the oven and the glass broken and The type range extends to 3/8 in. For these, larger chipped off, leaving a perfect rod which requires a size holders of much heavier construction arc avail­ minimum of polishing and can be cut to various able and in the 1/4 in. and 3/8 in. sizes, a safety bar lengths according to the use to which it is to be put. secures the type in the holder in addition to the Since the burned-out tube had no salvage value tightening screw. There are also other holders for originally, the destruction of the mould is of no con­ steel type for fly-press or pneumatic press use, and sequence and in a large factory, such as the Martin also the special range manufactured to enable type plant, the supply of "moulds" is practically inex­ to be used in the E.P.1 bench model marking machine. haustible. Edward Pryor and Son Ltd. have manufactured an extensive range of dies during the war years. These AIRWORTHINESS OF FOREIGN-BUILT include such interesting examples as dies for marking twist drills bearing characters only 0002 in. proud, AIRCRAFT and the accurate calibrating dies for marking micro­ meter barrels, larger dies for calibrating and numbering Inquiries arc being received by the Ministry of Civil aeroplane instrument panels and compass units; Aviation and the Air Registration Board which show tyre indicator marking dies, coining dies for barrel- that prospective purchasers of surplus military lock keys, male and female embossing dies and rotary and other aircraft of foreign construction hope to dies for various calibration purposes. operate these under British Civil registration. The Air Registration Board points out that for A Ground Thread Sample foreign-built aircraft British certificates of airworthi­ FIG. 2 is an interesting example of the work that ness cannot be issued, but that under the procedure can be produced on a thread-grinding machine—in laid down in the international convention, the this case a Churchill grinder. The projection of the foreign certificate of airworthiness issued by the high and incorporates 496 Metrovick infra-red 250- 40 t.p.i. work was to a magnification of 50:1 , the country of origin may be validated by the British watt lamps in gold-plated reflectors with a total load illustration being reproduced at approximately 6:1 . authorities. It is of interest to note that the clearances visible at of 124 kW. A track is provided for case of movement A foreign certificate so validated will serve the same the root and crest of the threads is more apparent and accurate location of the wing within the tunnel. purpose as a British certificate of airworthiness in so than real, since an inward movement of the gauge The fuselage and component tunnel is 20 ft. x 10 ft. x far as the aircraft may be required to be flown in 12 ft. high with the 520 lamps and reflectors arranged accordance with the Air Navigation Regulations in suitable contour. With this equipment the load is applicable to the United Kingdom. 130 kW. In these two plants the "filler" is stoved in It will accordingly be necessary for the applicant 45 minutes and the paint in 10 minutes. who proposes to purchase and to fly a foreign-built Both plants arc operated by push button automatic aircraft to produce, for the particular aircraft, a contactor control with time relays, each operation current certificate issued by the Airworthiness being automatically controlled from full to half load Authorities of the country of origin, or such a certi­ during the requisite time cycles. Selector switching is ficate validated already by another country, which is also incorporated in the bigger tunnel control gear, as either a contracting party to the I.C.A.N. or a country only a small proportion of the total number of lamps with which the United Kingdom has made a bilateral is required for processing the nose. In both control agreement with respect to reciprocal validation of panels hand switching is incorporated. certificates of airworthiness. Two mobile servicing plants (FIG. 4) arc used for It is a matter of particular importance in entering patching, each one having a bank of 30 lamps and into negotiations for purchase of such an aircraft employing a 7·5 kW load. The lamps are mounted that the British purchaser should ensure that the on a jib adjustable at any height between 2 ft. and seller of the foreign-built aircraft will be able to trans­ 7 ft. from floor level. Radiation is possible upward or fer with the aircraft the necessary documents relating downward, dependent on whether the top or bottom to airworthiness. Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Tools for the Workshop

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 18 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1946

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031340
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Monthly Selection of Recent Equipment and New Methods would close them at approximately twice the rate of that on the flanks. The Churchill Machine Tool Co. Ltd. points out that it has achieved this efficiency as a result of forty years' experience in designing and building precision grinders. It is the "Pulcrush" equipment incorporated in the machine that relieves the machine ways and the grinding spindle bearings of crushing loads. Paint Hardening Equipment for High-Speed Aeroplanes The Gloster Meteor which regained the air speed record for Great Britain was processed in the modern paint shop of the Gloster Aircraft Co. The coatings of fillers and paints were stoved in infra-red electric lamp tunnels: the wings, fuselage and nose units were all stoved in equipment supplied by the Metropolitan- Vickers Electrical Co. Ltd. One plant being used for the wings and another for the fuselage and smaller components. The wing tunnel (FIG. 3) is 20 ft. x 9 ft. x 13 ft. of the wing or fuselage is to be stoved. Mounted on rubber-tyred wheels these mobile plants constitute a most useful addition to the main plants. Tool Marking Equipment Utilizing Old Fluorescent Tubes We have recently received details of some of the The Glenn L. Martin Company, Baltimore, Mary­ Pryor marking equipment, which includes founts of land, arc using burned-out fluorescent light tubes to. interchangeable steel type, each packed in a fitted mould plastic rods for a multitude of purposes. This oak case complete with a hand holder of patented idea was suggested by a Martin employee who found design (FIG. 1). The type packs including such hand the demand for plastic rods to be used as tool handles, holders arc in sizes 1/16 in., 3/32 in. and ⅛ in. ; they contain stiffeners, etc., far in excess of the equipment available 100 pieces of type in a selected variety of figures and to mould them. (FIG. 5) letters and 12 spacing pieces, together with a pair of In practice, one end of the burned-out tube is cut off tweezers. An Allen key for operating the patent type- and the tube itself is filled with a liquid Catabond or locking device which is a feature of the holders is Catavar thermo-setting resin and then placed in an provided with each set. Both the holders and type oven for curing. The cured plastic, still in the tube, is have a satin nickel finish. removed from the oven and the glass broken and The type range extends to 3/8 in. For these, larger chipped off, leaving a perfect rod which requires a size holders of much heavier construction arc avail­ minimum of polishing and can be cut to various able and in the 1/4 in. and 3/8 in. sizes, a safety bar lengths according to the use to which it is to be put. secures the type in the holder in addition to the Since the burned-out tube had no salvage value tightening screw. There are also other holders for originally, the destruction of the mould is of no con­ steel type for fly-press or pneumatic press use, and sequence and in a large factory, such as the Martin also the special range manufactured to enable type plant, the supply of "moulds" is practically inex­ to be used in the E.P.1 bench model marking machine. haustible. Edward Pryor and Son Ltd. have manufactured an extensive range of dies during the war years. These AIRWORTHINESS OF FOREIGN-BUILT include such interesting examples as dies for marking twist drills bearing characters only 0002 in. proud, AIRCRAFT and the accurate calibrating dies for marking micro­ meter barrels, larger dies for calibrating and numbering Inquiries arc being received by the Ministry of Civil aeroplane instrument panels and compass units; Aviation and the Air Registration Board which show tyre indicator marking dies, coining dies for barrel- that prospective purchasers of surplus military lock keys, male and female embossing dies and rotary and other aircraft of foreign construction hope to dies for various calibration purposes. operate these under British Civil registration. The Air Registration Board points out that for A Ground Thread Sample foreign-built aircraft British certificates of airworthi­ FIG. 2 is an interesting example of the work that ness cannot be issued, but that under the procedure can be produced on a thread-grinding machine—in laid down in the international convention, the this case a Churchill grinder. The projection of the foreign certificate of airworthiness issued by the high and incorporates 496 Metrovick infra-red 250- 40 t.p.i. work was to a magnification of 50:1 , the country of origin may be validated by the British watt lamps in gold-plated reflectors with a total load illustration being reproduced at approximately 6:1 . authorities. It is of interest to note that the clearances visible at of 124 kW. A track is provided for case of movement A foreign certificate so validated will serve the same the root and crest of the threads is more apparent and accurate location of the wing within the tunnel. purpose as a British certificate of airworthiness in so than real, since an inward movement of the gauge The fuselage and component tunnel is 20 ft. x 10 ft. x far as the aircraft may be required to be flown in 12 ft. high with the 520 lamps and reflectors arranged accordance with the Air Navigation Regulations in suitable contour. With this equipment the load is applicable to the United Kingdom. 130 kW. In these two plants the "filler" is stoved in It will accordingly be necessary for the applicant 45 minutes and the paint in 10 minutes. who proposes to purchase and to fly a foreign-built Both plants arc operated by push button automatic aircraft to produce, for the particular aircraft, a contactor control with time relays, each operation current certificate issued by the Airworthiness being automatically controlled from full to half load Authorities of the country of origin, or such a certi­ during the requisite time cycles. Selector switching is ficate validated already by another country, which is also incorporated in the bigger tunnel control gear, as either a contracting party to the I.C.A.N. or a country only a small proportion of the total number of lamps with which the United Kingdom has made a bilateral is required for processing the nose. In both control agreement with respect to reciprocal validation of panels hand switching is incorporated. certificates of airworthiness. Two mobile servicing plants (FIG. 4) arc used for It is a matter of particular importance in entering patching, each one having a bank of 30 lamps and into negotiations for purchase of such an aircraft employing a 7·5 kW load. The lamps are mounted that the British purchaser should ensure that the on a jib adjustable at any height between 2 ft. and seller of the foreign-built aircraft will be able to trans­ 7 ft. from floor level. Radiation is possible upward or fer with the aircraft the necessary documents relating downward, dependent on whether the top or bottom to airworthiness. Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1946

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