Tools for the Workshop

Tools for the Workshop Workshop and Production Section A I R C R A F T E N G I N E E R I N G July, 1940 Details of Some Interesting Machines for Various Duties Th e router is driven by a 5 h.p. electric motor Modern Tools for Sheet Metal Work unit, with a speed of 15,000 r.p.m., which is totally NFORMATIO N has recently been released enclosed and fan cooled. A ¾ in . diameter pattern concerning two new power tools, developed in follower and J in. chuck are supplied. The drill I the United States, for the manipulatio n of sheet motor is of ½ h.p. , with the same speed. A ½ in. metal . Both these machines are particularly diamete r chuck and 1/16 in . diameter tapered hole- designed for the very accurate handling of the finder are provided. The motor spindles are de­ large panels which are becoming increasingly signed to avoid vibration. The workheads are common in aeroplane construction. These mounted on ball-bearing arms with a reach of machines, the makers claim, form a further step in 84 ins., which is sufficient to cover the two 4 ft. by the road towards the tru e mass production of aero­ 6 ft. worktables. The grips on the heads are pro­ planes necessitated by the modern demands of vided with "inching" button controls. military aviation. Th e arms are very substantially built and are The first of these new tools is shown in Fig. 1. mounted on a rigid cast-iron base. Incorporated I t is a power-operated shears of all-steel con­ in the arms are 1½ gal. cutting-oil tanks and a struction and is equipped with such up-to-date suction system for the removal of scurf. The refinements as hydraulic clamps for the sheet while design of these arms allows for th e take-u p of wear it is being cut. For the shearing of lengths of and is such that deflexion has been reduced to a material with complete accuracy it is necessary to minimum. have very fine knife clearances of the order of The weight of one such machine of th e A- l type, 0.001 in. These particular shears are capable of packed for export, is 4,900 lb . handling aluminium-alloy sheet of gauges ranging The other tools in the series are : the A-2 radial- from 0.005 in. t o 0.062 in., or even thicker, in dead- ar m router only, 84 in . reach; A-3 radial-arm accurat e lengths of 12 o r 18 feet. The Cincinnati drill only, 84 in . reach ; A-4 combination drill and Model No. 251 8 shears, shown in Fig . 1, is only one route r with 108 in. reach to cover 4 ft. by 12 ft. of several models extensively used by th e American tables ; A-5 radial-arm router only, 108 in . reach ; aviatio n industry. Smaller shears are also made A-6 radial-arm drill only, 108 in. reach. for the convenient and economical handling of Full particulars of these new machines can be shorter lengths. obtained from the British agent, Machine Shop The other tool is the press brake shown in Fig. 2 . Equipmen t Ltd., 124 Victoria Street. London, S.W.I. This is a machine that has been particularly de­ veloped to meet the needs of American designers, A New All-angle Drill who use corrugated sheet in preference to The problem of drilling in restricted spaces is separate skin stifleners, which is th e more common one which has occupied the minds of the designers practice in this country. With the typo of tool of hand tools for many years. Several solutions, shown, a standard die setting is made for each or partial solutions, have been found, and details market . This tool is th e Onsrud A-l Combination gauge of material used and, once the desired corru­ of one of the latest of these have now been made radial-arm router and drill. gation pitch has been obtained by adjusting the available by its manufacturer. This new drill is The machine, as will be seen from Fig. 3 , consists (lies, the press produces an accurately shaped th e Sioux No. 1495 ¦-in. all-angle electric drill. of two typical router heads mounted on the ex­ sheet by a quick series of strokes. Not unnaturally, As its name implies, this tool is of American origin. tremities of two stoutly-built articulated arms, with some thicknesses of sheet it is possible to work The main feature of it is the extreme compact­ which pivot on a substantial base. It will be faster than others so that machines for aircraft ness of the chuck head, which is set at about seen that the greatest advantage of this machine work are usually fitted with a two-speed mechanism. 55 deg. to the body of the tool. As ma y be seen over the more usual fixed router is the very much Like the shears, this press brake has been specially from the illustration, the motor casing forms the larger work that can be accommodated, as the designed for th e manipulatio n of very long pieces of hand grip and is provided with a trigger control. limiting factor of the throa t depth has been, to all sheet, such as might bo expected in main-plane The small size of the Sioux drill may be gauged intent s and purposes, eliminated. A further panels. b y the fact that the total length of the chuck advantag e is, of course, the dual-purpose workhead These two machine s are product s of th e Cincinnati an d the casing housing the bevel gears of the for drilling as well as routing. Shaper Co., for whom the sole selling agent in the drive is only 3⅝ in. Although the aluminium The main features of the Onsrud router, which is United Kingdom is E. H. Jones (Machine Tools) moto r case provides a smooth hand grip, there are mad e in six forms, are given below. Ltd. , Edgware Road, London, N.W.9. ampl e vents for the cooling of the motor. There is a chuck shield for th e protectio n of th e operator's A Radial-arm Router fingers. Th e following is a brief specification of the In our December, 1938 issue we published a Sioux drill : photograp h of a new tool being used in the U.S.A. Capacity in steel up to ½ in . dia. for the rapid cutting of large sheet-metal blanks.* Capacity i n hard wood . . .. .. .. up to ⅜ in . dia. This machine was an adaptation of the ordinary No-load speed .. .. .. .. .. .. 1,650 r.p.m. wood router, mounted on a long hinged arm, and A.C./D.C, 110 v 2 amps. had been developed by the Lockheed Aircraft Net weight 4½ lb. Corporation. Details have now become available Th e British agents for this tool are Messrs. of such a machine, also from America, for the open Morris & Ingram , of 26, Finsbur y Square, London, E.C.2, who quot e the current price as £8 17s. 6d., » " U.S. Methods of Aircraft Production," by T. P. Wright, an d from whom further particulars can be obtained AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Vol. X., December, 1938, p. 394 and Figs. on application. 26 and 27. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Tools for the Workshop

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 12 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1940

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030670
Publisher site
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Abstract

Workshop and Production Section A I R C R A F T E N G I N E E R I N G July, 1940 Details of Some Interesting Machines for Various Duties Th e router is driven by a 5 h.p. electric motor Modern Tools for Sheet Metal Work unit, with a speed of 15,000 r.p.m., which is totally NFORMATIO N has recently been released enclosed and fan cooled. A ¾ in . diameter pattern concerning two new power tools, developed in follower and J in. chuck are supplied. The drill I the United States, for the manipulatio n of sheet motor is of ½ h.p. , with the same speed. A ½ in. metal . Both these machines are particularly diamete r chuck and 1/16 in . diameter tapered hole- designed for the very accurate handling of the finder are provided. The motor spindles are de­ large panels which are becoming increasingly signed to avoid vibration. The workheads are common in aeroplane construction. These mounted on ball-bearing arms with a reach of machines, the makers claim, form a further step in 84 ins., which is sufficient to cover the two 4 ft. by the road towards the tru e mass production of aero­ 6 ft. worktables. The grips on the heads are pro­ planes necessitated by the modern demands of vided with "inching" button controls. military aviation. Th e arms are very substantially built and are The first of these new tools is shown in Fig. 1. mounted on a rigid cast-iron base. Incorporated I t is a power-operated shears of all-steel con­ in the arms are 1½ gal. cutting-oil tanks and a struction and is equipped with such up-to-date suction system for the removal of scurf. The refinements as hydraulic clamps for the sheet while design of these arms allows for th e take-u p of wear it is being cut. For the shearing of lengths of and is such that deflexion has been reduced to a material with complete accuracy it is necessary to minimum. have very fine knife clearances of the order of The weight of one such machine of th e A- l type, 0.001 in. These particular shears are capable of packed for export, is 4,900 lb . handling aluminium-alloy sheet of gauges ranging The other tools in the series are : the A-2 radial- from 0.005 in. t o 0.062 in., or even thicker, in dead- ar m router only, 84 in . reach; A-3 radial-arm accurat e lengths of 12 o r 18 feet. The Cincinnati drill only, 84 in . reach ; A-4 combination drill and Model No. 251 8 shears, shown in Fig . 1, is only one route r with 108 in. reach to cover 4 ft. by 12 ft. of several models extensively used by th e American tables ; A-5 radial-arm router only, 108 in . reach ; aviatio n industry. Smaller shears are also made A-6 radial-arm drill only, 108 in. reach. for the convenient and economical handling of Full particulars of these new machines can be shorter lengths. obtained from the British agent, Machine Shop The other tool is the press brake shown in Fig. 2 . Equipmen t Ltd., 124 Victoria Street. London, S.W.I. This is a machine that has been particularly de­ veloped to meet the needs of American designers, A New All-angle Drill who use corrugated sheet in preference to The problem of drilling in restricted spaces is separate skin stifleners, which is th e more common one which has occupied the minds of the designers practice in this country. With the typo of tool of hand tools for many years. Several solutions, shown, a standard die setting is made for each or partial solutions, have been found, and details market . This tool is th e Onsrud A-l Combination gauge of material used and, once the desired corru­ of one of the latest of these have now been made radial-arm router and drill. gation pitch has been obtained by adjusting the available by its manufacturer. This new drill is The machine, as will be seen from Fig. 3 , consists (lies, the press produces an accurately shaped th e Sioux No. 1495 ¦-in. all-angle electric drill. of two typical router heads mounted on the ex­ sheet by a quick series of strokes. Not unnaturally, As its name implies, this tool is of American origin. tremities of two stoutly-built articulated arms, with some thicknesses of sheet it is possible to work The main feature of it is the extreme compact­ which pivot on a substantial base. It will be faster than others so that machines for aircraft ness of the chuck head, which is set at about seen that the greatest advantage of this machine work are usually fitted with a two-speed mechanism. 55 deg. to the body of the tool. As ma y be seen over the more usual fixed router is the very much Like the shears, this press brake has been specially from the illustration, the motor casing forms the larger work that can be accommodated, as the designed for th e manipulatio n of very long pieces of hand grip and is provided with a trigger control. limiting factor of the throa t depth has been, to all sheet, such as might bo expected in main-plane The small size of the Sioux drill may be gauged intent s and purposes, eliminated. A further panels. b y the fact that the total length of the chuck advantag e is, of course, the dual-purpose workhead These two machine s are product s of th e Cincinnati an d the casing housing the bevel gears of the for drilling as well as routing. Shaper Co., for whom the sole selling agent in the drive is only 3⅝ in. Although the aluminium The main features of the Onsrud router, which is United Kingdom is E. H. Jones (Machine Tools) moto r case provides a smooth hand grip, there are mad e in six forms, are given below. Ltd. , Edgware Road, London, N.W.9. ampl e vents for the cooling of the motor. There is a chuck shield for th e protectio n of th e operator's A Radial-arm Router fingers. Th e following is a brief specification of the In our December, 1938 issue we published a Sioux drill : photograp h of a new tool being used in the U.S.A. Capacity in steel up to ½ in . dia. for the rapid cutting of large sheet-metal blanks.* Capacity i n hard wood . . .. .. .. up to ⅜ in . dia. This machine was an adaptation of the ordinary No-load speed .. .. .. .. .. .. 1,650 r.p.m. wood router, mounted on a long hinged arm, and A.C./D.C, 110 v 2 amps. had been developed by the Lockheed Aircraft Net weight 4½ lb. Corporation. Details have now become available Th e British agents for this tool are Messrs. of such a machine, also from America, for the open Morris & Ingram , of 26, Finsbur y Square, London, E.C.2, who quot e the current price as £8 17s. 6d., » " U.S. Methods of Aircraft Production," by T. P. Wright, an d from whom further particulars can be obtained AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Vol. X., December, 1938, p. 394 and Figs. on application. 26 and 27.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1940

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