Toil andTrouble

Toil andTrouble Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXIV No 279 MAY 1952 of the number of years over which the piston-engine has been in existence, and that it may be said—at any rate in its aero-engine E have frequently in the past given expression to our form—to have reached a peak stage beyond which one is unable belief that one of the more useful functions AIRCRAFT to see much prospect of development it is curious that what is W ENGINEERING can perform is to publish from time to unquestionably an important aspect of it, particularly affecting its time articles summarizing the position and surveying the existing life, seems to have received so little serious attention. One cannot state of knowledge on some subject of general interest. The difficulty, help wondering how these engines have managed to get along so of course, always is to find someone with the time, as well as the well as they have through what amounts to practically the whole of inclination, to step back from his day-to-day routine investigations their development to the point of maximum efficiency, when one to prepare such a paper. Certainly that has always been the obstacle aspect of the oils used in their lubrication, and the conditions we have met when we have formed the opinion that the time has affecting it, appears to have been a subject on which little or no arrived when a survey on such broad lines of this or that matter precise information has existed. More than that, it is apparently the would be of interest; apart from the view that a sufficient state of fact that most of the lines of researeh that have been pursued have finality has not been attained for the process to be possible, pre­ been in actually the opposite direction from that desirable in the supposing that such a condition ever is reached in any branch of best interests of engines, in being directed towards attaining the knowledge. maximum amount of foam rather than to reducing it to the mini­ mum. Though whether the desire to produce a 'head' on their bever­ From a Good Address age is the reason for the interest of brewers in the subject—as evi­ It is the more pleasing when an article of the nature we have denced in the list of references—we are not sure. indicated is offered to us without prior solicitation or invitation; particularly since, when it is written so to speak con amore in this Conflicting Desiderata way because the authors feel an urge to write, it is the more likely It will be remembered that in December last we published an to cover the proposed ground fully and adequately. This is the case article by M R N. SHARP on oil systems designed to make for ease of with the contribution on aeration and foaming in lubricating oil starting in cold climates; on which the advantages of dilution by systems by MESSRS TOURRET and WHITE in this issue; which has injecting fuel so as to thin the oil to make easier the turning over of two further features to recommend it. It comes from the THORNTON cold engines was mentioned. It is somewhat perturbing to find that RESEAREH CENTRE which has an enviable record for high quality this commonly used and popular device is referred to in the new investigations into fuels and lubricants for internal combustion paper with disfavour as being likely to lead to the production of engines of all types; while one of the authors, MR TOURRET, con­ considerable quantities of vapour' which might displace large tributed with another co-adjutor, MR E. F. WINTER, a similar type volumes of oil from the engine. Indeed petrol (strangely in an English of article on the requirements and available equipment for the air paper referred to throughout as 'gasoline' by the authors) so intro­ conditioning of aircraft cabins at altitude to these columns in July duced is stigmatized along with water and gasket sealing compounds last year, so that he has already proved his ability to produce a as 'contamination'—a choice of word which indicates what is general aurvey of this sort. thought of it from the foaming point of view. Of course, it is necessary to maintain a certain sense of proportion in this matter and remem­ A Moot Point ber that contamination in this sense only affects the oil for a An examination of the list of references to literature shows that short time on the ground. Much more important is the effect of the authors have made a very thorough survey of the ground that altitude in causing an increase in the tendency of the oil to foam has been covered by the publication of the works of other investi­ when the aeroplane is in flight. In this connexion it may be pointed gators in this field. The only criticism that we have here is that it is out that though the paper only specifically deals with piston-engines somewhat tantalizing for the earnest seeker after knowledge to find the same phenomena are presumably likely to occur in the lubrica­ that five of the thirty-eight papers to which reference is made are tion of gas turbines and therefore the subject is likely to be of not available for consultation owing to their being classified as of continuing importance. restricted circulation. We have always felt that reference to unpub­ lished work of this nature is both unhelpful and slightly irritating. On the other hand, the mention of them is presumably evidence that Two Aspects their contents are familiar to the authors, who have consulted Primarily, perhaps, the whole subject is of interest because of the them and extracted from them information calculated to ensure excessive consumption caused by the loss of oil as a result of foaming, the completeness of their own story, and indeed that certain data are but this is not the end of the matter since, as the authors point out, included which are not otherwise publicly available. the much more vital matter of efficiency of lubrication of bearings may arise owing to the formation of vapour locks in the system. On Delayed Reaction this aspect the authors are able to give valuable hints on the design of oil tanks and the supply and return systems between tanks and One general point that strikes us as strange is that so much of the researeh work reported on is comparatively recent. When one thinks engine to obviate the danger of entrapped air affecting the flow. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Toil andTrouble

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 24 (5): 1 – May 1, 1952

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032154
Publisher site
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Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXIV No 279 MAY 1952 of the number of years over which the piston-engine has been in existence, and that it may be said—at any rate in its aero-engine E have frequently in the past given expression to our form—to have reached a peak stage beyond which one is unable belief that one of the more useful functions AIRCRAFT to see much prospect of development it is curious that what is W ENGINEERING can perform is to publish from time to unquestionably an important aspect of it, particularly affecting its time articles summarizing the position and surveying the existing life, seems to have received so little serious attention. One cannot state of knowledge on some subject of general interest. The difficulty, help wondering how these engines have managed to get along so of course, always is to find someone with the time, as well as the well as they have through what amounts to practically the whole of inclination, to step back from his day-to-day routine investigations their development to the point of maximum efficiency, when one to prepare such a paper. Certainly that has always been the obstacle aspect of the oils used in their lubrication, and the conditions we have met when we have formed the opinion that the time has affecting it, appears to have been a subject on which little or no arrived when a survey on such broad lines of this or that matter precise information has existed. More than that, it is apparently the would be of interest; apart from the view that a sufficient state of fact that most of the lines of researeh that have been pursued have finality has not been attained for the process to be possible, pre­ been in actually the opposite direction from that desirable in the supposing that such a condition ever is reached in any branch of best interests of engines, in being directed towards attaining the knowledge. maximum amount of foam rather than to reducing it to the mini­ mum. Though whether the desire to produce a 'head' on their bever­ From a Good Address age is the reason for the interest of brewers in the subject—as evi­ It is the more pleasing when an article of the nature we have denced in the list of references—we are not sure. indicated is offered to us without prior solicitation or invitation; particularly since, when it is written so to speak con amore in this Conflicting Desiderata way because the authors feel an urge to write, it is the more likely It will be remembered that in December last we published an to cover the proposed ground fully and adequately. This is the case article by M R N. SHARP on oil systems designed to make for ease of with the contribution on aeration and foaming in lubricating oil starting in cold climates; on which the advantages of dilution by systems by MESSRS TOURRET and WHITE in this issue; which has injecting fuel so as to thin the oil to make easier the turning over of two further features to recommend it. It comes from the THORNTON cold engines was mentioned. It is somewhat perturbing to find that RESEAREH CENTRE which has an enviable record for high quality this commonly used and popular device is referred to in the new investigations into fuels and lubricants for internal combustion paper with disfavour as being likely to lead to the production of engines of all types; while one of the authors, MR TOURRET, con­ considerable quantities of vapour' which might displace large tributed with another co-adjutor, MR E. F. WINTER, a similar type volumes of oil from the engine. Indeed petrol (strangely in an English of article on the requirements and available equipment for the air paper referred to throughout as 'gasoline' by the authors) so intro­ conditioning of aircraft cabins at altitude to these columns in July duced is stigmatized along with water and gasket sealing compounds last year, so that he has already proved his ability to produce a as 'contamination'—a choice of word which indicates what is general aurvey of this sort. thought of it from the foaming point of view. Of course, it is necessary to maintain a certain sense of proportion in this matter and remem­ A Moot Point ber that contamination in this sense only affects the oil for a An examination of the list of references to literature shows that short time on the ground. Much more important is the effect of the authors have made a very thorough survey of the ground that altitude in causing an increase in the tendency of the oil to foam has been covered by the publication of the works of other investi­ when the aeroplane is in flight. In this connexion it may be pointed gators in this field. The only criticism that we have here is that it is out that though the paper only specifically deals with piston-engines somewhat tantalizing for the earnest seeker after knowledge to find the same phenomena are presumably likely to occur in the lubrica­ that five of the thirty-eight papers to which reference is made are tion of gas turbines and therefore the subject is likely to be of not available for consultation owing to their being classified as of continuing importance. restricted circulation. We have always felt that reference to unpub­ lished work of this nature is both unhelpful and slightly irritating. On the other hand, the mention of them is presumably evidence that Two Aspects their contents are familiar to the authors, who have consulted Primarily, perhaps, the whole subject is of interest because of the them and extracted from them information calculated to ensure excessive consumption caused by the loss of oil as a result of foaming, the completeness of their own story, and indeed that certain data are but this is not the end of the matter since, as the authors point out, included which are not otherwise publicly available. the much more vital matter of efficiency of lubrication of bearings may arise owing to the formation of vapour locks in the system. On Delayed Reaction this aspect the authors are able to give valuable hints on the design of oil tanks and the supply and return systems between tanks and One general point that strikes us as strange is that so much of the researeh work reported on is comparatively recent. When one thinks engine to obviate the danger of entrapped air affecting the flow.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1952

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