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To what extent does Sussex Recovery College reflect its community? An equalities and diversity audit

To what extent does Sussex Recovery College reflect its community? An equalities and diversity audit The purpose of this paper is to explore whether one Recovery College reflects its community.Design/methodology/approachRecovery College students’ demographics and protected characteristics were compared with the general population and the population of people using local mental health services.FindingsRecovery College students were representative of the local community in terms of ethnicity, religion or belief and sexual orientation. Fewer Recovery College students were over 60 years old or men.Practical implicationsRecovery Colleges may be more accessible to people who are often under-served and under-represented in mainstream mental health services, including people from BAME backgrounds and people who identify as LGBT. Recovery Colleges may need to engage more men and more older people. Recovery Colleges aim to be inclusive and open to all but need to ensure that this is a reality in practice.Originality/valueThis is the first study to explore who accesses Recovery Colleges and whether they are inclusive and open to all. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mental Health and Social Inclusion Emerald Publishing

To what extent does Sussex Recovery College reflect its community? An equalities and diversity audit

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2042-8308
DOI
10.1108/mhsi-04-2019-0011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether one Recovery College reflects its community.Design/methodology/approachRecovery College students’ demographics and protected characteristics were compared with the general population and the population of people using local mental health services.FindingsRecovery College students were representative of the local community in terms of ethnicity, religion or belief and sexual orientation. Fewer Recovery College students were over 60 years old or men.Practical implicationsRecovery Colleges may be more accessible to people who are often under-served and under-represented in mainstream mental health services, including people from BAME backgrounds and people who identify as LGBT. Recovery Colleges may need to engage more men and more older people. Recovery Colleges aim to be inclusive and open to all but need to ensure that this is a reality in practice.Originality/valueThis is the first study to explore who accesses Recovery Colleges and whether they are inclusive and open to all.

Journal

Mental Health and Social InclusionEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 19, 2019

Keywords: Education; Mental health; Recovery; Diversity; Equalities; Recovery College

References