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Timeless projects: remembering and voice in the history of education

Timeless projects: remembering and voice in the history of education I want to revisit also some of the ideas that linked memory and subjectivity that were popularised in the 1970s and 1980s response to limitations of the positivist tradition. I am concerned also with the relationship between the present and the past as it gets expressed in memory work to interrogate more fully not only ‘what happened’, but also how events come to be remembered in the ways that they are, and how they come to be understood as history. These ideas will be developed by drawing on some of what I consider to be key studies that use oral history, some directly related to education, some not. I will finish with voices that are not my own. These will be the voices of participants in an oral history project with which I have been involved. They will demonstrate in a more meaningful way, the ideas presented here and how a coming together of the fields of oral history and memory studies can enrich the understandings we have of experience in the history of education. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Timeless projects: remembering and voice in the history of education

History of Education Review , Volume 37 (2): 11 – Oct 14, 2008

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/08198691200800006
Publisher site
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Abstract

I want to revisit also some of the ideas that linked memory and subjectivity that were popularised in the 1970s and 1980s response to limitations of the positivist tradition. I am concerned also with the relationship between the present and the past as it gets expressed in memory work to interrogate more fully not only ‘what happened’, but also how events come to be remembered in the ways that they are, and how they come to be understood as history. These ideas will be developed by drawing on some of what I consider to be key studies that use oral history, some directly related to education, some not. I will finish with voices that are not my own. These will be the voices of participants in an oral history project with which I have been involved. They will demonstrate in a more meaningful way, the ideas presented here and how a coming together of the fields of oral history and memory studies can enrich the understandings we have of experience in the history of education.

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 14, 2008

Keywords: Scholarship; Education; Language; Cultural knowledge

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