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Time Use and Psychological Wellbeing in Unemployed Youngsters

Time Use and Psychological Wellbeing in Unemployed Youngsters Looks at the possible association between spare time use andpsychological wellbeing in a longitudinal investigation of young peoplewho were studied from 1980 when they were still at school to 1988when they were in the workforce. In those who were unemployed ordissatisfied with their jobs, spare time spent in solitary, aimlessactivities was negatively associated with psychological wellbeing,whereas spare time spent in purposeful activities, particularly thoseinvolving other people, was positively associated with psychologicalwellbeing. No such associations were observed in those who were employedin jobs they saw as satisfactory, or in any of the groups while theywere still at school. Discusses the implications for counsellingdissatisfied young workers and the young unemployed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Employee Counselling Today Emerald Publishing

Time Use and Psychological Wellbeing in Unemployed Youngsters

Employee Counselling Today , Volume 5 (2): 5 – Feb 1, 1993

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0955-8217
DOI
10.1108/13665629310039196
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Looks at the possible association between spare time use andpsychological wellbeing in a longitudinal investigation of young peoplewho were studied from 1980 when they were still at school to 1988when they were in the workforce. In those who were unemployed ordissatisfied with their jobs, spare time spent in solitary, aimlessactivities was negatively associated with psychological wellbeing,whereas spare time spent in purposeful activities, particularly thoseinvolving other people, was positively associated with psychologicalwellbeing. No such associations were observed in those who were employedin jobs they saw as satisfactory, or in any of the groups while theywere still at school. Discusses the implications for counsellingdissatisfied young workers and the young unemployed.

Journal

Employee Counselling TodayEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1993

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