This Country's Highways are a Menace to Production

This Country's Highways are a Menace to Production Scientific VOLUME 7 JUN E No. 6 195 5 LUBRICATION This Country's Highways are a Menace to Production THIS country is enjoying one of the most pros- exports and general business prosperity which are perous business eras in history, and therefore both vital to our well being. this is the time to make what effort we can, a time Before this could be done, however, it is vitally when we can afford the money, to ensure its main­ necessary to provide the roads to carry the extra tenance. Throughout history, slumps have followed traffic that would result. Such a road system would peaks of prosperity and it behoves us now to foresee not merely benefit the extra motorists, it would the competition looming against our principal exports. provide faster travel of goods from factory to factory, Help has recently been given to our textile trade, but from manufacturer to shop and from warehouse to only just in time to prevent its collapse. The motor docks. No one will dispute that accelerated deliv­ industry, without whose exports we should be in a eries of raw materials are one of the foremost aids to sorry plight is proposing to build larger factories and production. some of these are designed to double production. Motor cars, today, are only infrequently run solely They may seem to need no help, but let us not be for pleasure. In most cases, probably over 90%, they too certain. are part of a business which could not exist without We understand that the cost of producing the them. The cost of their maintenance, their fuel and Volkswagen car in Germany is only 2,250 marks, the time taken to drive them goes on the expenses about £187 sterling. This car is sold there for about sheet and adds to production costs. Until our £329. Production is shortly to exceed 1,000 a day. transport system is relieved of taxes, until our high­ I t is not unreasonable to suppose that in the face of ways are such as to permit fast and safe travel between principal towns and ports, until our Govern­ strong competition, Volkswagen cars could be sold a t below £300. This is virtually the same car which ment appreciates the vital importance of low trans­ is on sale, and is selling, in this country, at a price of port costs, we shall continue to work against increas­ £422 10s. 0d. plus £177 3s. 4d. purchase tax, total ing difficulties and expenses which may, in time, £599 13s. 4d. In other words it competes with cars cause such serious bottle necks to production, that in the U.K. costing £600. This is real evidence of the we lose those overseas contracts without which this country cannot exist. overseas competition that this major industry has to face. The first step is to provide roads that our transport There seem to be two ways of maintaining our system needs, and to do this at a time when we can export motor car business, either we compete on afford them. The time is now. price or on quality. Before the war we certainly won hands down on quality—the name we made then has paid dividends since. Today, it is doubtful Fil m on Loan if we can continue for very long to compete in the popular class in either category. We have already "Highways of Tomorrow " noted instances where cars have been sold cheaper overseas than they can be bought at home, the policy The type of highways we need are to be seen in a of taking advantage of the home buyer and making film (available on loan from Esso Petroleum Company him subsidise the overseas customer is a bad one. Ltd.) entitled "Highways for Tomorrow" which well demonstrates the problems of congested main roads Motor car manufacturers state that if they can of Britain and their effect on commercial traffic and increase production they can reduce prices (we would like to see more evidence of this). If popular cars the nation's economy. It includes by way of con­ were cheaper and if purchase tax were abolished, it trast, scenes of modern motorways in various Euro­ should be possible to buy an 8 h.p. car or van for less pean countries. The film runs for 15 mins. and it than £250 and corresponding reductions would be should be seen by every M.P. as well as the general made on all models. The effect of this would be an audiences for which it is intended. Institutions and Societies of all kinds can do considerable good by immediate reduction in production costs of almost every type of article. The loss in revenue from borrowing this film and showing it to as many people purchase tax would soon be returned in increased as they can muster. Scientific LUBRICATION 11 June, 1955 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

This Country's Highways are a Menace to Production

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, Volume 7 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb052338
Publisher site
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Abstract

Scientific VOLUME 7 JUN E No. 6 195 5 LUBRICATION This Country's Highways are a Menace to Production THIS country is enjoying one of the most pros- exports and general business prosperity which are perous business eras in history, and therefore both vital to our well being. this is the time to make what effort we can, a time Before this could be done, however, it is vitally when we can afford the money, to ensure its main­ necessary to provide the roads to carry the extra tenance. Throughout history, slumps have followed traffic that would result. Such a road system would peaks of prosperity and it behoves us now to foresee not merely benefit the extra motorists, it would the competition looming against our principal exports. provide faster travel of goods from factory to factory, Help has recently been given to our textile trade, but from manufacturer to shop and from warehouse to only just in time to prevent its collapse. The motor docks. No one will dispute that accelerated deliv­ industry, without whose exports we should be in a eries of raw materials are one of the foremost aids to sorry plight is proposing to build larger factories and production. some of these are designed to double production. Motor cars, today, are only infrequently run solely They may seem to need no help, but let us not be for pleasure. In most cases, probably over 90%, they too certain. are part of a business which could not exist without We understand that the cost of producing the them. The cost of their maintenance, their fuel and Volkswagen car in Germany is only 2,250 marks, the time taken to drive them goes on the expenses about £187 sterling. This car is sold there for about sheet and adds to production costs. Until our £329. Production is shortly to exceed 1,000 a day. transport system is relieved of taxes, until our high­ I t is not unreasonable to suppose that in the face of ways are such as to permit fast and safe travel between principal towns and ports, until our Govern­ strong competition, Volkswagen cars could be sold a t below £300. This is virtually the same car which ment appreciates the vital importance of low trans­ is on sale, and is selling, in this country, at a price of port costs, we shall continue to work against increas­ £422 10s. 0d. plus £177 3s. 4d. purchase tax, total ing difficulties and expenses which may, in time, £599 13s. 4d. In other words it competes with cars cause such serious bottle necks to production, that in the U.K. costing £600. This is real evidence of the we lose those overseas contracts without which this country cannot exist. overseas competition that this major industry has to face. The first step is to provide roads that our transport There seem to be two ways of maintaining our system needs, and to do this at a time when we can export motor car business, either we compete on afford them. The time is now. price or on quality. Before the war we certainly won hands down on quality—the name we made then has paid dividends since. Today, it is doubtful Fil m on Loan if we can continue for very long to compete in the popular class in either category. We have already "Highways of Tomorrow " noted instances where cars have been sold cheaper overseas than they can be bought at home, the policy The type of highways we need are to be seen in a of taking advantage of the home buyer and making film (available on loan from Esso Petroleum Company him subsidise the overseas customer is a bad one. Ltd.) entitled "Highways for Tomorrow" which well demonstrates the problems of congested main roads Motor car manufacturers state that if they can of Britain and their effect on commercial traffic and increase production they can reduce prices (we would like to see more evidence of this). If popular cars the nation's economy. It includes by way of con­ were cheaper and if purchase tax were abolished, it trast, scenes of modern motorways in various Euro­ should be possible to buy an 8 h.p. car or van for less pean countries. The film runs for 15 mins. and it than £250 and corresponding reductions would be should be seen by every M.P. as well as the general made on all models. The effect of this would be an audiences for which it is intended. Institutions and Societies of all kinds can do considerable good by immediate reduction in production costs of almost every type of article. The loss in revenue from borrowing this film and showing it to as many people purchase tax would soon be returned in increased as they can muster. Scientific LUBRICATION 11 June, 1955

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1955

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