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Third sector facilitation of lived experience in research: a case study of service user and carer involvement in the PRIMROSE project

Third sector facilitation of lived experience in research: a case study of service user and carer... Purpose– The physical health needs of people with mental health problems are currently under addressed and often ignored, both in training and in practice. The PRIMROSE trial intervention was designed to remedy that – focusing in particular on risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This paper describes how people with experience of using mental health services and carers contributed to the development of the PRIMROSE intervention. It draws out key messages for educators, researchers and practitioners. Design/methodology/approach– Using a case study approach the paper outlines how a Third sector organisation supported the study team in setting up a Lived Experience Advisory Panel (LEAP), drawing on a pre-existing model and recent thinking about service user and carer involvement in research. It is described how the approach sought to engage wider involvement of people with an interest in CVD while also offering more focused input into specifically the development of the trial intervention. Findings –An innovative approach was taken whereby a large LEAP, comprising 27 service users and carers, was supporting the development of the study mainly through e-mail and web updates and feedback, while a sub-group of the LEAP, with eight members, met three times and had a focus on inputting ideas into the development of the intervention. The creation of a LEAP proved helpful to the project, resulting in an enhanced and more relevant intervention – summed up in a series of eleven recommendations. Appointment of an independent chair of the sub-group proved invaluable and there is learning from this project for other similar initiatives. Originality/value– This study has value for others who are developing practice interventions. A range of suggestions were made which will have relevance for training, ensuring that physical health issues are not ignored. There is much to learn too from the process of this project, for the involvement of service users and carers in research, education and in practice development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Mental Health Training Education and Practice Emerald Publishing

Third sector facilitation of lived experience in research: a case study of service user and carer involvement in the PRIMROSE project

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References (31)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1755-6228
DOI
10.1108/JMHTEP-03-2013-0008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose– The physical health needs of people with mental health problems are currently under addressed and often ignored, both in training and in practice. The PRIMROSE trial intervention was designed to remedy that – focusing in particular on risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This paper describes how people with experience of using mental health services and carers contributed to the development of the PRIMROSE intervention. It draws out key messages for educators, researchers and practitioners. Design/methodology/approach– Using a case study approach the paper outlines how a Third sector organisation supported the study team in setting up a Lived Experience Advisory Panel (LEAP), drawing on a pre-existing model and recent thinking about service user and carer involvement in research. It is described how the approach sought to engage wider involvement of people with an interest in CVD while also offering more focused input into specifically the development of the trial intervention. Findings –An innovative approach was taken whereby a large LEAP, comprising 27 service users and carers, was supporting the development of the study mainly through e-mail and web updates and feedback, while a sub-group of the LEAP, with eight members, met three times and had a focus on inputting ideas into the development of the intervention. The creation of a LEAP proved helpful to the project, resulting in an enhanced and more relevant intervention – summed up in a series of eleven recommendations. Appointment of an independent chair of the sub-group proved invaluable and there is learning from this project for other similar initiatives. Originality/value– This study has value for others who are developing practice interventions. A range of suggestions were made which will have relevance for training, ensuring that physical health issues are not ignored. There is much to learn too from the process of this project, for the involvement of service users and carers in research, education and in practice development.

Journal

The Journal of Mental Health Training Education and PracticeEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 16, 2013

Keywords: Lived experience; Service users; Carers; Patient and public involvement (PPI) ; Mental health services; Patients

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