Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Thinking transnationally: interconnections and connectivity within and across Australia and New Zealand

Thinking transnationally: interconnections and connectivity within and across Australia and New... In this article I examine the role of ANZHES and its contribution to the development of the field over the past 40 years. Drawing on a range of theories, I argue that the annual exchange (or pilgrimage) of academics between Australia and New Zealand has been a vital component in the nurturing of our intellectual geographies and the formation of ANZHES as an intellectual community of scholars. And while ANZHES might well be borderless, there has been a gradual emergence of a border zone as academic work, academic knowledge and the Academy has been increasingly fractured, partitioned and dispersed. What then is the disciplinary territory that historians of education now occupy? How has the landscape of our work shifted and changed? To what extent might these connections be represented in ANZHES’ academic journal? http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Thinking transnationally: interconnections and connectivity within and across Australia and New Zealand

History of Education Review , Volume 39 (2): 12 – Oct 14, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/thinking-transnationally-interconnections-and-connectivity-within-and-uojhDLRIx4
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/08198691201000011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article I examine the role of ANZHES and its contribution to the development of the field over the past 40 years. Drawing on a range of theories, I argue that the annual exchange (or pilgrimage) of academics between Australia and New Zealand has been a vital component in the nurturing of our intellectual geographies and the formation of ANZHES as an intellectual community of scholars. And while ANZHES might well be borderless, there has been a gradual emergence of a border zone as academic work, academic knowledge and the Academy has been increasingly fractured, partitioned and dispersed. What then is the disciplinary territory that historians of education now occupy? How has the landscape of our work shifted and changed? To what extent might these connections be represented in ANZHES’ academic journal?

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 14, 2010

Keywords: Australia; New Zealand; Community; Scholars; Academic knowledge; Historians

There are no references for this article.