There's something in your eye: ethical implications of augmented visual field devices

There's something in your eye: ethical implications of augmented visual field devices PurposeThis paper explores the ethical and social impact of augmented visual field devices (AVFDs), identifying issues that AVFDs share with existing devices as well as suggesting new ethical and social issues that arise with the adoption of AVFDs.Design/methodology/approachThis essay incorporates both a philosophical and an ethical analysis approach. It is based on Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, philosophical notions of transparency and presence, and human values including psychological well-being, physical well-being, privacy, deception, informed consent, ownership and property, and trust.FindingsThe paper concludes that the interactions among developers, users, and non-users via AVFDs have implications for autonomy. It also identifies issues of ownership that arise due to the blending of physical and virtual space and important ways that these devices impact identity and trust.Practical implicationsDevelopers ought to take time to design and implement an easy to use informed consent system with these devices. There is a strong need for consent protocols among developers, users, and non-users of AVFDs.Originality/valueThere is new analysis of how AVFDs impact individual identity and the attendant ties to notions of ownership of the space between an object and someone’s eyes, and control over perception. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society Emerald Publishing

There's something in your eye: ethical implications of augmented visual field devices

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1477-996X
DOI
10.1108/JICES-10-2015-0035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThis paper explores the ethical and social impact of augmented visual field devices (AVFDs), identifying issues that AVFDs share with existing devices as well as suggesting new ethical and social issues that arise with the adoption of AVFDs.Design/methodology/approachThis essay incorporates both a philosophical and an ethical analysis approach. It is based on Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, philosophical notions of transparency and presence, and human values including psychological well-being, physical well-being, privacy, deception, informed consent, ownership and property, and trust.FindingsThe paper concludes that the interactions among developers, users, and non-users via AVFDs have implications for autonomy. It also identifies issues of ownership that arise due to the blending of physical and virtual space and important ways that these devices impact identity and trust.Practical implicationsDevelopers ought to take time to design and implement an easy to use informed consent system with these devices. There is a strong need for consent protocols among developers, users, and non-users of AVFDs.Originality/valueThere is new analysis of how AVFDs impact individual identity and the attendant ties to notions of ownership of the space between an object and someone’s eyes, and control over perception.

Journal

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in SocietyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 8, 2016

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