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Theory of planned behavior and women in senior-level athletic administration

Theory of planned behavior and women in senior-level athletic administration PurposeWomen continue to be underrepresented in the athletic director (AD) position across all divisions of the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the USA (Acosta and Carpenter, 2014). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of personal aspirations in pursing the AD position.Design/methodology/approachThis qualitative examination focuses on the experiences of nine women who occupy senior associate AD positions and applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to examine how attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control influence their aspirations to pursue the AD role.FindingsThe authors suggest a combination of negative attitudes, subjective norms, and lack of perceived behavioral control negatively influencing a woman’s aspirations to pursue the AD position. These conclusions indicate women’s experiences of career advancement are constraining with regard to advancing to the AD position.Research limitations/implicationsAlthough this study lacks generalizability, TPB is helpful in understanding underrepresentation of women in the AD position.Practical implicationsFurthermore, the authors suggest organizational strategies that cultivate and value women’s experiences. These can equalize the hegemonic male environment of intercollegiate athletics and decrease underrepresentation of women in the most senior-level position in athletic administration.Originality/valueThis study is one of the first to apply TPB to explain career advancement of women in senior management positions in athletic administration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

Theory of planned behavior and women in senior-level athletic administration

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2042-678X
DOI
10.1108/SBM-07-2015-0022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeWomen continue to be underrepresented in the athletic director (AD) position across all divisions of the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the USA (Acosta and Carpenter, 2014). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of personal aspirations in pursing the AD position.Design/methodology/approachThis qualitative examination focuses on the experiences of nine women who occupy senior associate AD positions and applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to examine how attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control influence their aspirations to pursue the AD role.FindingsThe authors suggest a combination of negative attitudes, subjective norms, and lack of perceived behavioral control negatively influencing a woman’s aspirations to pursue the AD position. These conclusions indicate women’s experiences of career advancement are constraining with regard to advancing to the AD position.Research limitations/implicationsAlthough this study lacks generalizability, TPB is helpful in understanding underrepresentation of women in the AD position.Practical implicationsFurthermore, the authors suggest organizational strategies that cultivate and value women’s experiences. These can equalize the hegemonic male environment of intercollegiate athletics and decrease underrepresentation of women in the most senior-level position in athletic administration.Originality/valueThis study is one of the first to apply TPB to explain career advancement of women in senior management positions in athletic administration.

Journal

Sport, Business and Management: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 13, 2017

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