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The Woman‐friendly Organization Initiatives Valued by Managerial Women

The Woman‐friendly Organization Initiatives Valued by Managerial Women Examines the importance of 19 different organizational initiatives or services in helping managerial and professional women develop a more satisfying and productive career. Data were collected from 245 women in early career stages using questionnaires. There was considerable variability in the importance of each initiative across the sample. Women with family responsibilities rated family‐friendly policies and time off work as more important, and career development and training initiatives as less important. Offers implications for organizations and managerial women and men. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Employee Counselling Today Emerald Publishing

The Woman‐friendly Organization Initiatives Valued by Managerial Women

Employee Counselling Today , Volume 6 (6): 8 – Dec 1, 1994

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0955-8217
DOI
10.1108/13665629410074501
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Examines the importance of 19 different organizational initiatives or services in helping managerial and professional women develop a more satisfying and productive career. Data were collected from 245 women in early career stages using questionnaires. There was considerable variability in the importance of each initiative across the sample. Women with family responsibilities rated family‐friendly policies and time off work as more important, and career development and training initiatives as less important. Offers implications for organizations and managerial women and men.

Journal

Employee Counselling TodayEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1994

Keywords: Career development; Discrimination; Top management; Women

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