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The use of CALCIUM STEARATE in wire drawing

The use of CALCIUM STEARATE in wire drawing THE tremendous shearing forces incurred when centage s of over 10% b y weight ma y be dispersed by heating . In many cases it is preferable to dissolve wire is cold drawn through one or a series of th e calcium stearat e in mineral oil in order t o combine dies , have always presented a difficult problem in th e lubricating properties of both components. Up lubrication . In view of the increased rate of pro­ t o 30 % by weight ma y be dissolved in mineral oil if ductio n involving faster travel of the wire through temperature s of 200°C. are used. Such solutions th e die, the lubrication and cooling of the wire and naturall y gel on cooling. di e become more difficult of satisfactory solution. I t is usual to employ soaps of the alkaline earth In a Grease. metal s for this work and of these, calcium stearate I f it is desired to increase the volume of a n oil gel, is ver y widely used. I t is possibl e t o bu y two thi s may be done by grade s of suitabl e calcium cooling the oil solution stearat e powder, precipi­ below 100°C. an d making tate d and fused. The small additions of water, th e use of former contains G.5 to stirrin g at th e same time. 7.0 % calcium content as I n this way, up to 30% meta l and the latter, a b y weight of water may CALCIUM STEARATE somewha t coarser powder, b e incorporated in the contain s about 6.0%. final grease. The smooth­ i n wir e drawing Bot h grades are virtually ness of th e grease may be moistur e proof, do not improve d b y th e addition penetrat e and may be of suitable emulsifying agent s to th e oil after cooling. Fused or precipitated use d for longperiods of time a t pressures and speeds tha t do nothea t th e lubricated surfaces to a tempera­ calcium stearate may be used for this work. tur e greater than 65°C. There are four methods of application . As an Aqueous Solution. Th e precipitated grade should be used to form an As a Dry Powder. aqueou s solution. It should be added in small Th e precipitated grade is best for this work and portion s and stirred into a dilute solution of a dis­ applicatio n is by allowing the wire to dip into a persin g agent in water. A suitable dispersing agent troug h of th e powder before passing through the die. enable s the production of reasonably stable milks I t may also be dusted on to th e wire. The quantity containin g about 20 % calcium stearate. neede d depends upon th e surface of th e wire. Porous Paste s may be prepared with the use of sulphon- surfaces need very little and smooth surfaces in ate d castor oil in place of the dispersing agent, but continuou s motion need more in order t o replace tha t thi s is not effective in dilute solutions. The stability remove d from th e zone of contact . The largo surface of dilute suspensions may be increased by the in­ are a of calcium stearate powder per unit weight (10 corporatio n of 0.5-1.5 % b y weight of methy l cellulose gm . occupy 40-50 cc.) permits its use in smaller a s a thickening agent, calculated on th e weight of th e amount s than the denser lubricants. It can also be final product. blown into otherwise inaccessible places by gas W e are indebted to A. Boake, Roberts & Co. Ltd . currents . "Ellerslie" , Buckhurst Hill, Essex, for the above Dispersed in a Solvent. informatio n from whom further details concerning Calcium stearate can be dissolved in light hydro­ th e use of calcium stearate for wire drawing, extrud­ carbo n solvents such as naptlia, xylene etc. Per­ ing and stamping processes can be obtained. Scientific LUBRICATION 17 May, 1949 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

The use of CALCIUM STEARATE in wire drawing

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology , Volume 1 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1949

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb052003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE tremendous shearing forces incurred when centage s of over 10% b y weight ma y be dispersed by heating . In many cases it is preferable to dissolve wire is cold drawn through one or a series of th e calcium stearat e in mineral oil in order t o combine dies , have always presented a difficult problem in th e lubricating properties of both components. Up lubrication . In view of the increased rate of pro­ t o 30 % by weight ma y be dissolved in mineral oil if ductio n involving faster travel of the wire through temperature s of 200°C. are used. Such solutions th e die, the lubrication and cooling of the wire and naturall y gel on cooling. di e become more difficult of satisfactory solution. I t is usual to employ soaps of the alkaline earth In a Grease. metal s for this work and of these, calcium stearate I f it is desired to increase the volume of a n oil gel, is ver y widely used. I t is possibl e t o bu y two thi s may be done by grade s of suitabl e calcium cooling the oil solution stearat e powder, precipi­ below 100°C. an d making tate d and fused. The small additions of water, th e use of former contains G.5 to stirrin g at th e same time. 7.0 % calcium content as I n this way, up to 30% meta l and the latter, a b y weight of water may CALCIUM STEARATE somewha t coarser powder, b e incorporated in the contain s about 6.0%. final grease. The smooth­ i n wir e drawing Bot h grades are virtually ness of th e grease may be moistur e proof, do not improve d b y th e addition penetrat e and may be of suitable emulsifying agent s to th e oil after cooling. Fused or precipitated use d for longperiods of time a t pressures and speeds tha t do nothea t th e lubricated surfaces to a tempera­ calcium stearate may be used for this work. tur e greater than 65°C. There are four methods of application . As an Aqueous Solution. Th e precipitated grade should be used to form an As a Dry Powder. aqueou s solution. It should be added in small Th e precipitated grade is best for this work and portion s and stirred into a dilute solution of a dis­ applicatio n is by allowing the wire to dip into a persin g agent in water. A suitable dispersing agent troug h of th e powder before passing through the die. enable s the production of reasonably stable milks I t may also be dusted on to th e wire. The quantity containin g about 20 % calcium stearate. neede d depends upon th e surface of th e wire. Porous Paste s may be prepared with the use of sulphon- surfaces need very little and smooth surfaces in ate d castor oil in place of the dispersing agent, but continuou s motion need more in order t o replace tha t thi s is not effective in dilute solutions. The stability remove d from th e zone of contact . The largo surface of dilute suspensions may be increased by the in­ are a of calcium stearate powder per unit weight (10 corporatio n of 0.5-1.5 % b y weight of methy l cellulose gm . occupy 40-50 cc.) permits its use in smaller a s a thickening agent, calculated on th e weight of th e amount s than the denser lubricants. It can also be final product. blown into otherwise inaccessible places by gas W e are indebted to A. Boake, Roberts & Co. Ltd . currents . "Ellerslie" , Buckhurst Hill, Essex, for the above Dispersed in a Solvent. informatio n from whom further details concerning Calcium stearate can be dissolved in light hydro­ th e use of calcium stearate for wire drawing, extrud­ carbo n solvents such as naptlia, xylene etc. Per­ ing and stamping processes can be obtained. Scientific LUBRICATION 17 May, 1949

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1949

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