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The underground press of the Vietnam era An annotated bibliography

The underground press of the Vietnam era An annotated bibliography Despite the title of this bibliography, there was not a truly underground press in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s. The phrase is amisnomer, reputedly coined on the spur of the moment in 1966 by Thomas Forcade when asked to describe the newly established news service, Underground Press Syndicate, of which he was an active member. The papers mentioned in this bibliography, except for the publications of the Weather Underground, were not published by secretive, covert organizations. Freedom of the press and of expression is protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution, although often only symbolically as the experience of the undergrounds will show, and most of the publications that fall into the underground described herein maintained public offices, contracted with commercial printers, and often used the U.S. Postal Service to distribute their publications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reference Services Review Emerald Publishing

The underground press of the Vietnam era An annotated bibliography

Reference Services Review , Volume 18 (4): 21 – Apr 1, 1990

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0090-7324
DOI
10.1108/eb049109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite the title of this bibliography, there was not a truly underground press in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s. The phrase is amisnomer, reputedly coined on the spur of the moment in 1966 by Thomas Forcade when asked to describe the newly established news service, Underground Press Syndicate, of which he was an active member. The papers mentioned in this bibliography, except for the publications of the Weather Underground, were not published by secretive, covert organizations. Freedom of the press and of expression is protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution, although often only symbolically as the experience of the undergrounds will show, and most of the publications that fall into the underground described herein maintained public offices, contracted with commercial printers, and often used the U.S. Postal Service to distribute their publications.

Journal

Reference Services ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1990

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