The strength and quality of climate perceptions

The strength and quality of climate perceptions Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how climate strength and quality are related to employee commitment above and beyond individual climate perceptions. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected from 48 work units in organizations from different branches of industry. A total of 419 employees completed a questionnaire. Findings – Climate quality was related to commitment above and beyond individual climate perceptions. However, this concerned the climate dimensions of cooperation and innovation, but not reward. Climate strength moderated the relationship between individual cooperation and innovation perceptions, and commitment. Research limitations/implications – This study emphasizes the importance of group‐level perceptions as related to employee commitment. Because of the cross‐sectional design, conclusions about the causal order of the variables cannot be drawn. Practical implications – If organizations want to increase employees' commitment they should put the more skeptical employees in positive work environments, thus, in units of higher cooperation and innovation quality. Social implications – People are sensitive to the evaluative tone of their social environment. Originality/value – The paper is the first to examine the combined relationships of individual climate perceptions, climate‐strength, and climate quality with employee commitment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Managerial Psychology Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0268-3946
DOI
10.1108/02683941111099637
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how climate strength and quality are related to employee commitment above and beyond individual climate perceptions. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected from 48 work units in organizations from different branches of industry. A total of 419 employees completed a questionnaire. Findings – Climate quality was related to commitment above and beyond individual climate perceptions. However, this concerned the climate dimensions of cooperation and innovation, but not reward. Climate strength moderated the relationship between individual cooperation and innovation perceptions, and commitment. Research limitations/implications – This study emphasizes the importance of group‐level perceptions as related to employee commitment. Because of the cross‐sectional design, conclusions about the causal order of the variables cannot be drawn. Practical implications – If organizations want to increase employees' commitment they should put the more skeptical employees in positive work environments, thus, in units of higher cooperation and innovation quality. Social implications – People are sensitive to the evaluative tone of their social environment. Originality/value – The paper is the first to examine the combined relationships of individual climate perceptions, climate‐strength, and climate quality with employee commitment.

Journal

Journal of Managerial PsychologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 25, 2011

Keywords: Individual perception; Quality; Organizations; Organizational culture; Employee attitudes

References

  • Group consensus and psychological well‐being: a large field study
    Bliese, P.D.; Halverson, R.R.
  • New directions in social comparison research
    Buunk, B.P.; Mussweiler, T.
  • Location, location, location: contextualizing organizational research
    Rousseau, D.; Fried, Y.
  • Organizational climate systems and psychological climate perceptions: a cross‐level study of climate‐satisfaction relationships
    Schulte, M.; Ostroff, C.; Kinicky, A.J.
  • Organizational socialization: the missing link between employee needs and organizational culture
    Taormina, R.J.
  • Person‐organization fit: the match between newcomers' and recruiters' preferences for organizational cultures
    Van Vianen, A.E.M.

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