Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The seven value stream mapping tools

The seven value stream mapping tools Develops a new value stream or supply‐chain mapping typology. This seven‐map typology is based on the different wastes inherent in value streams. The use of the various tools, either singularly or in combination, is therefore driven by the types of waste to be removed. The tools themselves are drawn from a range of existing functional ghettos such as logistics, operations management and engineering. Maintains that two of the seven tools can be regarded as completely new. This cross‐functional approach means that the choice of tools to be used can be made from outside of traditional departmental boundaries, affording researchers and companies the opportunity to use the most appropriate tools rather than merely those that are well‐known in their function. Describes each tool briefly and gives a simple mechanism for choosing which is most appropriate to contingent situations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Operations & Production Management Emerald Publishing

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/the-seven-value-stream-mapping-tools-cFJlzqbww6

References (33)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0144-3577
DOI
10.1108/01443579710157989
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Develops a new value stream or supply‐chain mapping typology. This seven‐map typology is based on the different wastes inherent in value streams. The use of the various tools, either singularly or in combination, is therefore driven by the types of waste to be removed. The tools themselves are drawn from a range of existing functional ghettos such as logistics, operations management and engineering. Maintains that two of the seven tools can be regarded as completely new. This cross‐functional approach means that the choice of tools to be used can be made from outside of traditional departmental boundaries, affording researchers and companies the opportunity to use the most appropriate tools rather than merely those that are well‐known in their function. Describes each tool briefly and gives a simple mechanism for choosing which is most appropriate to contingent situations.

Journal

International Journal of Operations & Production ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1997

Keywords: Contingency planning; Cross‐functional integration; Process layout; Supply‐chain management; Value analysis; Waste disposal

There are no references for this article.