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The roles of self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in the mentoring relationship A longitudinal multi‐source investigation

The roles of self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in the mentoring relationship A... Purpose – The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of protégé self‐presentation by self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in mentoring. Design/methodology/approach – This study used three data sources (i.e. employees, peers, and mentors) and a longitudinal design over a period of two years. Findings – Employee self‐disclosure and modesty at time 1 predicted an increase in mentoring received and mentoring given at time 2. Further, self‐monitoring moderated the modesty‐mentoring given relationship such that employees high in self‐monitoring had the strongest positive relationship between modesty at time 1 and mentoring given two years later. Also, modesty interacted with self‐monitoring at time 1 to influence the number of mentors involved with employees. That is, the modesty – number of mentors relationship was positive for those high in self‐monitoring, and negative for those low in self‐monitoring. Research limitations/implications – Employees can exercise influence over the amount and type of mentoring experiences they receive based on the style on interaction they utilize with potential mentors, with specific reference to self‐monitoring and the use of modesty. Practical implications – It is modesty, and early career employees' ability to present it well, that will lead to positive affect (i.e. liking) and behavior (e.g. benevolence and generosity) by senior managers. Originality/value – Investigates the role of protégé self‐presentation by self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in mentoring. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Career Development International Emerald Publishing

The roles of self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in the mentoring relationship A longitudinal multi‐source investigation

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1362-0436
DOI
10.1108/13620430810870485
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of protégé self‐presentation by self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in mentoring. Design/methodology/approach – This study used three data sources (i.e. employees, peers, and mentors) and a longitudinal design over a period of two years. Findings – Employee self‐disclosure and modesty at time 1 predicted an increase in mentoring received and mentoring given at time 2. Further, self‐monitoring moderated the modesty‐mentoring given relationship such that employees high in self‐monitoring had the strongest positive relationship between modesty at time 1 and mentoring given two years later. Also, modesty interacted with self‐monitoring at time 1 to influence the number of mentors involved with employees. That is, the modesty – number of mentors relationship was positive for those high in self‐monitoring, and negative for those low in self‐monitoring. Research limitations/implications – Employees can exercise influence over the amount and type of mentoring experiences they receive based on the style on interaction they utilize with potential mentors, with specific reference to self‐monitoring and the use of modesty. Practical implications – It is modesty, and early career employees' ability to present it well, that will lead to positive affect (i.e. liking) and behavior (e.g. benevolence and generosity) by senior managers. Originality/value – Investigates the role of protégé self‐presentation by self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in mentoring.

Journal

Career Development InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: May 9, 2008

Keywords: Self assessment; Mentoring; Employee behaviour

References